Clinical research
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Rescooped by Faiza Khawaja from eClinical Technology for Clinical Trials
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Imaging in Oncology Clinical Trials: Visualizing Cancers for Better Treatment

Imaging in Oncology Clinical Trials: Visualizing Cancers for Better Treatment | Clinical research | Scoop.it
Medical Imaging technology has opened the door the visualize cancers during clinical trials. Check out the different types of medical imaging used.

Via Michelle Berdeal
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GRU could get marijuana oil trials

Children in Georgia with difficult to treat seizures could get access to a marijuana-derived oil through clinical trials at Georgia Regents University, Gov. Nathan Deal announced Thursday.
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Rescooped by Faiza Khawaja from Digital Disruption in Pharma
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Increase Low Income Participants in Clinical Trials by Giving Away Apple iPhones & ResearchKit

Increase Low Income Participants in Clinical Trials by Giving Away Apple iPhones & ResearchKit | Clinical research | Scoop.it

Last week, with the announcement of Apple's ResearchKit, Sage Bionetworks in Seattle enrolled more than 7,000 Parkinson's patients in a single day for their Parkinson's study. As a point of reference, the largest clinical trial ever conducted for Parkinson's had just 1,700 patients.


This incredible surge in enrollment is a dramatic indication that the scale, speed, and accuracy of basic medical research is about to increase exponentially. For clinical trials conducted by pharmaceutical companies, the impact of ResearchKit also holds great promise – but, for a variety of reasons, that promise may not appear as quickly or dramatically as will be seen for basic medical research.

 

To gauge the potential impact of ResearchKit on pharma, it's important to recognize the specific challenges facing clinical trials and to imagine how, and if, ResearchKit will address these specific issues.


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Pharma Guy's curator insight, March 17, 2015 7:15 AM


One specific issue mentioned was that "using the iPhone will not make sense for every trial, especially since iPhone user demographics may not be representative of the target population."


The author argues that lower income people may not have an iPhone. First, I'm wondering how many people of low income are recruited into drug trials right now? Most recruiting is done by physicians with private patients. We know that many low income people cannot afford to visit physicians on a regular basis. Hence, they are not likely to ever be recruited.


Instead of seeing this as a problem, I see it as an opportunity, Why not give away iPhones to poorer patients? Apple & cell phone companies can offer lower prices to help subsidize this. It could be an incentive for staying in the trial.And it could be a GREAT marketing gimmick.