Clinical Psychology
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Rescooped by Elizabeth Neatherway from Abnormal Psychology
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Mental health for all by involving all

Nearly 450 million people are affected by mental illness worldwide. In wealthy nations, just half receive appropriate care, but in developing countries, close to 90 percent go untreated because psychiatrists are in such short supply.

Via Sandeep Gautam
Elizabeth Neatherway's insight:

This TED talk really opens up people’s eyes to the statistics of mental illness. It is a very personal topic to me and the fact that not even half the people get the specialist care they need in order to get better is very saddening. Suicide is the most common cause of death for young people in every country, why is this fact not a reason to do something about it? Maybe more psychiatrists is the answer instead of making more and more cut backs on the NHS, it is clear that these people need help as mental illness is just as serious as any other illness. Dare To Care.

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, January 27, 2014 7:55 PM

We dont necessarily need more psychitarists; if specialists are rare, educate and empower the common man/ generalists to deliver specialised services.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Neatherway from Eating disorders
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She nearly died of anorexia, now she shares her story of recovery with others - fox4kc.com

She nearly died of anorexia, now she shares her story of recovery with others - fox4kc.com | Clinical Psychology | Scoop.it
She nearly died of anorexia, now she shares her story of recovery with others
fox4kc.com
LAWRENCE, Kan. — It's been a long battle with anorexia and bulimia and after a near death experience, Danielle Buettner is slowly recovering.

Via Keeley McManus
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Keeley McManus's curator insight, March 21, 2014 8:03 AM

Its important for stories like this to be shared. The 'it can never happen to me' state of mind can be common, but real life stories show how it can happen to anyone developing or battling eating disorders

Scooped by Elizabeth Neatherway
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Anxiety is a greater risk factor for suicide than depression, studies report

Elizabeth Neatherway's insight:

is this saying people who suffer from anxiety are more likely to have suicidal thoughts than people with depression? how about people with depression often suffer from anxiety...

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Rescooped by Elizabeth Neatherway from Eating Disorders: Anorexia
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Real-Life Barbie Doll: Model Transforms into Doll-Like Image - YouTube


Via Elissa Berardi
Elizabeth Neatherway's insight:

Is this not positive reinforcement? The fact it’s being broadcasted via Television and the World Wide Web puts across a dangerous message to many people, mainly young girls. What message is this sending? It shouldn’t be encouraging… to the model herself we are giving her exactly what she wants – attention. And this attention is what she’ll use to continue striving to look like her role model doll: Barbie. Why do you think eating disorders have increased dramatically in numbers over the past years… people strive to be like their role models so that we form a parasocial relationship with them, we don’t know them personally but if we are similar to them and know a lot about them we can talk, gossip, follow etc them and they can’t tell us any different for example if we are wrong, and they can’t be disloyal either due to the fact they don’t know you. Broadcasting things like this rises attention to the extremities that some people go to to get noticed.

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Elissa Berardi's comment, March 4, 2013 1:20 PM
People will do what ever it takes to look like a role model.
Rescooped by Elizabeth Neatherway from Eating disorders
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How Facebook Contributes To Eating Disorders - TIME (blog)

How Facebook Contributes To Eating Disorders - TIME (blog) | Clinical Psychology | Scoop.it
Daily Mail
How Facebook Contributes To Eating Disorders
TIME (blog)
In order to figure out how Facebook affects young girls' sense of body image, researchers from American University in Washington D.C.

Via Keeley McManus
Elizabeth Neatherway's insight:

so what exactly is "Eating Disorder Safe"? if evidence shows that even browsing through pictures of others is enough to bring body image worries... on a daily basis we are surrounded by media images whether that be on television, magazines, adverts etc, the pressure on body image these days is huge and people fear judgments - this needs to change.  

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Keeley McManus's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:02 PM

just by browsing others photos on a social networking site can influence personal thoughts on body image. The desire to be thin is heightened after photo related activity.

Rescooped by Elizabeth Neatherway from Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
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Expanded Clinical Definition of Anorexia May Help More Teens


Via Loula Koteas
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Scooped by Elizabeth Neatherway
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Multiple Personality Disorder a faux?

Multiple Personality Disorder a faux? | Clinical Psychology | Scoop.it

Thoughts on an article by Rosie Waterhouse, from New Scientist magazine. 28th September 2013.

Elizabeth Neatherway's insight:

How is it that one becomes diagnosed with MPD? As the article I read states; the vast majority of people with MPD has come about from risky techniques used by psychologists that can plant ideas in patient’s heads. Elizabeth Loftus even has evidence to show certain techniques can create false childhood memories e.g of abuse. The idea is that memories from our past become susceptible to change as they are encoded in our neural synapses, therefore its suggested that supposed “personalities” formed in therapy sessions are purely fictional. Misleading statements from the Psychiatrist such as “3/4 of patients displaying your symptoms have been abused” start to then play on the mind, as patients then blame mood swings and feelings on other personalities, when realistically it’s just other personality traits of that person. “Sybil” is a book known by many in which a fictional character is said to have taken on 16 different personalities. Shortly after this book was published cases of MPD had risen to 40,000 which is unusually high compared to the 200 cases reported worldwide before the book was published. Scary no? The book wasn’t even based on real life so how is it more patients were seen to be classed as MPD? Psychologists keeping on patients for more money perhaps... it’s a hard diagnoses to disprove as I believe there is little science to back up the theory, but then there is no concrete evidence to support it. In time there will be a massive corruption in MPD as more and more people are suing their doctors for false diagnoses, this is when they come to realise that these “personalities” are just different feelings/moods.  

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