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Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from Sustain Our Earth
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Warming climate pushes plants up the mountain

Warming climate pushes plants up the mountain | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it

In a rare opportunity to directly compare today's plant communities with a survey taken in the same area 50 years ago, a University of Arizona-led research team has provided the first on-the-ground evidence that Southwestern plants are being pushed to higher elevations by an increasingly warmer and drier climate.

 

The findings confirm that previous hypotheses are correct in their prediction that mountain communities in the Southwest will be strongly impacted by an increasingly warmer and drier climate, and that the area is already experiencing rapid vegetation change.


Via SustainOurEarth
Molly Langstraat's insight:

The warming climate is pushing vegetation up into higher elevations. If the climate contiues to warm researchers say that trees will be pushed up into higher elevations as well

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Corin McKinstrey's comment, October 2, 2013 12:19 PM
I think that this topic is very important. It is effecting the civilizations of people who live in these areas. These plants are what some civilizations revolve around so this is a very big change for them.
Marlee Morton's comment, October 3, 2013 2:55 PM
I thought this was a great article. It really shows just how much are climate is changing. It doesn't really matter if it was 50 years ago of 20 days ago. Earth is always rapidly changing. I believe over more and more time this will have a huge effect on the people on that region they might keep farming upland or find new places to grow their crops.
Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from Climate and Vegetation
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Vulnerability to climate change

Vulnerability to climate change | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it

Regions with both high climate and vegetation stability are shown in dark grey. Those regions with high climate stability but low levels of vegetation intactness are shown in dark orange. And those ecoregions with low climate stability but high vegetation intactness are dark cream. Regions that have both low climate stability and low levels of vegetation intactness are pale cream. Credit: Wildlife Conservation Society.


Via Mathijs Booden, Hilary Brummel
Molly Langstraat's insight:

I think that this is a good picture to learn about both climate and vegetation. It shows the levels of vegetation and climate very clearly and is easy to understand. It shows us that that most of the world does not have a stable climate or vegetation intactness. Which could be because of global warming.

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Hilary Brummel's curator insight, September 20, 2013 12:29 PM

I think this article is a good one. It says a lot about climate changes and it includes vegetation as well. I like how to picture shows low and high levels of vegetation. 

Brad Bortscheller's comment, September 27, 2013 12:10 PM
This article is great about climate change. It talks about why it happens and really gives me a better understanding on the issue at hand.
Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from World Environment Nature News
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Cleaner air from tackling climate change 'would save millions of lives'

Cleaner air from tackling climate change 'would save millions of lives' | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it
The benefits of a reduction in air pollution alone justify action on climate change, say the authors of a new report

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
Molly Langstraat's insight:

To summarize this article if we tackle climate change then we could make our air much cleaner. By making our climate stable we could change millions of lives. If we cut down our CO2 emission we get greater health value. Cutting down on our pollution will benefit China and east Asia.

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Morgan Kroes's comment, September 30, 2013 10:32 AM
I think this is a good idea, because pollution is becoming a big problem, especially in certain areas.
Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from Last Call
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How Global Warming will Change Wine Regions

How Global Warming will Change Wine Regions | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it

Our planet is undergoing one of the largest changes in climate since the dinosaurs went extinct. But what might be even more troubling for humans, plants and animals is the speed of the change.

 

If this trend continues at its current rapid pace, it will place significant stress on terrestrial ecosystems around the world, and many species will need to make behavioral, evolutionary or geographic adaptations to survive. Although some of the changes the planet will experience in the next few decades are already "baked into the system," how different the climate looks at the end of the 21st century will depend largely on how humans respond.

 

The findings come from a review of climate research by Noah Diffenbaugh, an associate professor of environmental Earth system science, and Chris Field, a professor of biology and of environmental Earth system science and the director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution. The work is part of a special report on climate change in the current issue of Science.

 

Diffenbaugh and Field, both senior fellows at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, conducted the targeted but broad review of scientific literature on aspects of climate change that can affect ecosystems, and investigated how recent observations and projections for the next century compare to past events in Earth's history.

 

For instance, the planet experienced a 5 degree Celsius hike in temperature 20,000 years ago, as Earth emerged from the last ice age. This is a change comparable to the high-end of the projections for warming over the 20th and 21st centuries.

 

The geologic record shows that, 20,000 years ago, as the ice sheet that covered much of North America receded northward, plants and animals recolonized areas that had been under ice. As the climate continued to warm, those plants and animals moved northward, to cooler climes.


Via Vino in Love , The New Media Moguls
Molly Langstraat's insight:

I think that winegrowers should watch the climate changes carefully. If the soil is to dry then it could directly affect the quality of the wine being made. I think that winegrowers should be more conscious about the level of water the soil and the grapes are getting. I think that winegrowers should also be more conscious about when hurricanes and other storms happen because it will effect the amount of water that the plants need.

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Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from Climate&Vegetation
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Canada's Poor Climate Record Makes Keystone Mitigation Impossible

Canada's Poor Climate Record Makes Keystone Mitigation Impossible | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it
Canada’s failure to reduce emissions from its tar sands sector and lackluster climate record has recently been brought into focus. But there are also now questions about whether Canada could mitigate for the climate effects of Keystone XL.

Via SustainOurEarth, Carter Roose
Molly Langstraat's insight:

Canada has put out more emissions than they have cleaned up. As a result it has changed their climate.Their air is very polluted and if they continue to fail to reduce their emissions the level of emissions will continue to rise. I think that Canada could help by putting in filters and trying to make things cleaner and less wastefull in general.

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Carter Roose's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:12 PM

I think it is bad how they have those problems with the Keystone XL. To me if it is affecting your climate you should be trying to fix it. But it is hard to figure out how to fix it.

 

Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from ScubaObsessed
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Scuba divers hop in Giant Springs: Excess native vegetation is removed to ... - Great Falls Tribune

Scuba divers hop in Giant Springs: Excess native vegetation is removed to ... - Great Falls Tribune | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it
Scuba divers hop in Giant Springs: Excess native vegetation is removed to ...

Via Darrin Jillson
Molly Langstraat's insight:

I think it is good that the new manager is taking care of the excessive native vegetation. It is good to train new divers because it a safe place to start with diving training. I think that some of the excess vegetation should be left where it is. Extra vegetation isn't necessarily a bad thing, hence why it should be left alone. I do see where it could cause potential problems so it may also be a good thing to remove it.

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Marlee Morton's comment, October 3, 2013 2:51 PM
I thought this article was pretty cool I never knew that you needed to clear some vegetation out. I don't know if clearing all of it out is a good idea, because it is native to the area. I can see going in and taking some of it out, but I'm sure lots of animals, fish, and organisms rely on the vegetation.
Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from Amazing Science
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Current climate change is occurring 10 times faster than at any time in past 65 million years

Current climate change is occurring 10 times faster than at any time in past 65 million years | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it

Our planet is undergoing one of the largest changes in climate since the dinosaurs went extinct. But what might be even more troubling for humans, plants and animals is the speed of the change.

 

If this trend continues at its current rapid pace, it will place significant stress on terrestrial ecosystems around the world, and many species will need to make behavioral, evolutionary or geographic adaptations to survive. Although some of the changes the planet will experience in the next few decades are already "baked into the system," how different the climate looks at the end of the 21st century will depend largely on how humans respond.

 

The findings come from a review of climate research by Noah Diffenbaugh, an associate professor of environmental Earth system science, and Chris Field, a professor of biology and of environmental Earth system science and the director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution. The work is part of a special report on climate change in the current issue of Science.

 

Diffenbaugh and Field, both senior fellows at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, conducted the targeted but broad review of scientific literature on aspects of climate change that can affect ecosystems, and investigated how recent observations and projections for the next century compare to past events in Earth's history.

 

For instance, the planet experienced a 5 degree Celsius hike in temperature 20,000 years ago, as Earth emerged from the last ice age. This is a change comparable to the high-end of the projections for warming over the 20th and 21st centuries.

 

The geologic record shows that, 20,000 years ago, as the ice sheet that covered much of North America receded northward, plants and animals recolonized areas that had been under ice. As the climate continued to warm, those plants and animals moved northward, to cooler climes.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Molly Langstraat's insight:

I think that the change is inevidible. Humans and animals are going to have to learn to adjust as the climate continues to change. If we cut down on our pollution then the rate of climate change will slow. Humans need to learn how to help our Earth, not hurt it. 

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Jalpa Vyas's curator insight, August 4, 2013 12:20 PM

Nobody likes change but this one is inevitable and it is already quite evident that changes to our climate are occurring but this article suggests it is at a faster rate that has yet been recorded in the past.  We may need to be prepared for adapting sooner than we anticipated.

Rescooped by Molly Langstraat from World Environment Nature News
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The future is purple thanks to climate change | John Ingham | Columnists | Comment | Daily Express

The future is purple thanks to climate change | John Ingham | Columnists | Comment | Daily Express | Climate & Vegetation | Scoop.it
FORGET orange – the future is purple, according to a UN report on climate change.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
Molly Langstraat's insight:

I think it is interesting just how much climate can affect our maps. The purple should be shrinking, not growing. I believe that if we took care of our Earth better the purple color would be shrinking. If we work hard our planet will be healthy and able to sustain life for a long time. 

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