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NASA: Pause Exists And Is Due To Ocean Heat Storage ("a temporary relief that has long-term impacts")

NASA: Pause Exists And Is Due To Ocean Heat Storage ("a temporary relief that has long-term impacts") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it

A new NASA study of ocean temperature measurements shows in recent years extra heat from greenhouse gases has been trapped in the waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans. Researchers say this shifting pattern of ocean heat accounts for the slowdown in the global surface temperature trend observed during the past decade.

Researchers Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis and Bill Patzert of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California, found a specific layer of the Indian and Pacific oceans between 300 and 1,000 feet (100 and 300 meters) below the surface has been accumulating more heat than previously recognized. They also found the movement of warm water has affected surface temperatures. The result was published Thursday in the journal Science.

During the 20th century, as greenhouse gas concentrations increased and trapped more heat energy on Earth, global surface temperatures also increased. However, in the 21st century, this pattern seemed to change temporarily.

The Pacific Ocean is the primary source of the subsurface warm water found in the study, though some of that water now has been pushed to the Indian Ocean. Since 2003, unusually strong trade winds and other climatic features have been piling up warm water in the upper 1,000 feet of the western Pacific, pinning it against Asia and Australia.

"The western Pacific got so warm that some of the warm water is leaking into the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago," said Nieves, the lead author of the study.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:15 AM

What will the effect on the surface be if the ocean gets warmer through the years? Read this very new report and find out.


"Now a new analysis by three ocean scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory not only confirms that the extra heat has been going into the ocean, but it shows where. According to research by Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis, and Bill Patzert, the waters of the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean warmed significantly from 2003 to 2012. But the warming did not occur at the surface; it showed up below 10 meters (32 feet) in depth, and mostly between 100 to 300 meters (300 to 1,000 feet) below the sea surface. They published their results on July 9, 2015, in the journal Science."

“Overall, the ocean is still absorbing extra heat,” said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. “But the top couple of layers of the ocean exchange heat easily and can keep it away from the surface for ten years or so because of natural cycles. In the long run, the planet is still warming.”

Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:17 AM

What will the effect on the surface be if the ocean gets warmer through the years? Read this very new report and find out.

 

"Now a new analysis by three ocean scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory not only confirms that the extra heat has been going into the ocean, but it shows where. According to research by Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis, and Bill Patzert, the waters of the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean warmed significantly from 2003 to 2012. But the warming did not occur at the surface; it showed up below 10 meters (32 feet) in depth, and mostly between 100 to 300 meters (300 to 1,000 feet) below the sea surface. They published their results on July 9, 2015, in the journal Science."

“Overall, the ocean is still absorbing extra heat,” said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. “But the top couple of layers of the ocean exchange heat easily and can keep it away from the surface for ten years or so because of natural cycles. In the long run, the planet is still warming.”

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NASA: Pause Exists And Is Due To Ocean Heat Storage ("a temporary relief that has long-term impacts")

NASA: Pause Exists And Is Due To Ocean Heat Storage ("a temporary relief that has long-term impacts") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it

A new NASA study of ocean temperature measurements shows in recent years extra heat from greenhouse gases has been trapped in the waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans. Researchers say this shifting pattern of ocean heat accounts for the slowdown in the global surface temperature trend observed during the past decade.

Researchers Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis and Bill Patzert of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California, found a specific layer of the Indian and Pacific oceans between 300 and 1,000 feet (100 and 300 meters) below the surface has been accumulating more heat than previously recognized. They also found the movement of warm water has affected surface temperatures. The result was published Thursday in the journal Science.

During the 20th century, as greenhouse gas concentrations increased and trapped more heat energy on Earth, global surface temperatures also increased. However, in the 21st century, this pattern seemed to change temporarily.

The Pacific Ocean is the primary source of the subsurface warm water found in the study, though some of that water now has been pushed to the Indian Ocean. Since 2003, unusually strong trade winds and other climatic features have been piling up warm water in the upper 1,000 feet of the western Pacific, pinning it against Asia and Australia.

"The western Pacific got so warm that some of the warm water is leaking into the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago," said Nieves, the lead author of the study.


Via Bert Guevara
more...
Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:15 AM

What will the effect on the surface be if the ocean gets warmer through the years? Read this very new report and find out.


"Now a new analysis by three ocean scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory not only confirms that the extra heat has been going into the ocean, but it shows where. According to research by Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis, and Bill Patzert, the waters of the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean warmed significantly from 2003 to 2012. But the warming did not occur at the surface; it showed up below 10 meters (32 feet) in depth, and mostly between 100 to 300 meters (300 to 1,000 feet) below the sea surface. They published their results on July 9, 2015, in the journal Science."

“Overall, the ocean is still absorbing extra heat,” said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. “But the top couple of layers of the ocean exchange heat easily and can keep it away from the surface for ten years or so because of natural cycles. In the long run, the planet is still warming.”

Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:17 AM

What will the effect on the surface be if the ocean gets warmer through the years? Read this very new report and find out.

 

"Now a new analysis by three ocean scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory not only confirms that the extra heat has been going into the ocean, but it shows where. According to research by Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis, and Bill Patzert, the waters of the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean warmed significantly from 2003 to 2012. But the warming did not occur at the surface; it showed up below 10 meters (32 feet) in depth, and mostly between 100 to 300 meters (300 to 1,000 feet) below the sea surface. They published their results on July 9, 2015, in the journal Science."

“Overall, the ocean is still absorbing extra heat,” said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. “But the top couple of layers of the ocean exchange heat easily and can keep it away from the surface for ten years or so because of natural cycles. In the long run, the planet is still warming.”

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4 Takeaways from the Annual Climate Review ("for students of climate change; a brief review")

4 Takeaways from the Annual Climate Review ("for students of climate change; a brief review") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
The annual State of the Climate report shows how 2014 broke all kinds of warming records.

Numerous records were broken last year, according to the State of the Climate report, an annual checkup of the global climate published in a special issue of the journal Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

Here are four key points to draw from the report:

Carbon dioxide levels are rising: This is the trend that underlies global warming, as it is the rise of carbon dioxideand other greenhouse gases from human activities — first recognized in the famous Keeling Curve — that is driving the rise of Earth’s temperature. 

Earth’s temperature is rising: A direct consequence of the build-up of greenhouse gases is a steady rise in Earth’s average temperature from all the excess heat those gases trap and prevent from escaping out into space. Arndt called this temperature rise “one of the most obvious connections to a changing climate.”

The oceans are heating up: Not only was Earth’s temperature record warm in 2014, but so were the global oceans, as sea surface temperatures and the heat of the upper oceans also hit record highs. “The heat content is just continuing to pile up,”

Overall, ice is melting: All the excess heat in the Earth system, both at the surface and in the oceans, has contributed to the steady disappearance of the planet’s ice, including Arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and permafrost.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 29, 2015 10:13 PM

Are you familiar with the major climate issues of the day? Here they are in a nutshell.

 

"While each of these components of the Earth’s system tells a part of the story of the warming planet, together they combine into a powerful narrative of the planet’s plight.

“It’s the whole global climate system,” NCEI director Thomas Karl said. “These things are all intricately linked to each other.”

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Obama's big climate plan is now final -- and it's even stronger than expected ("a time for action ")

Obama's big climate plan is now final -- and it's even stronger than expected ("a time for action ") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
The EPA will require utilities to make deeper cuts in emissions from power plants, and will incentivize use of renewable energy.

The Clean Power Plan, assuming it survives legal challenges, is set to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 32 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. It’s the biggest component of Obama’s Climate Action Plan, and the centerpiece of any realistic program to meet our emission-reduction pledges from the 2009 Copenhagen Accord and the intended targets we have outlined ahead of the Paris climate talks that will take place later this year.

One big change from the proposed rule a year ago is that states will have two more years — until 2022 instead of 2020 — to start meeting emission-reduction requirements. While this sounds like a step backward, it is part of a correction to an odd feature of the original proposal, which is that it required sizeable cuts at the front end and little further improvement in the later years. The path now starts with lesser demands but grows steeper.

With its draft plan, the EPA estimated that emissions would be cut 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030; now it’s bumped that estimate up to 32 percent. Administration officials argue it therefore will actually reduce emissions more in the long run, especially if you look beyond 2030. “That will help drive deeper decarbonization not just in 2030, but in subsequent years as well,” said Brian Deese, a top Obama policy advisor, on the press call Sunday afternoon. “This rule gives us a strong foundation to keep pushing forward against our international commitments and is stronger when you look out at 2030 and beyond.”


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 4, 2015 9:04 PM

Actually, the US has to do more, from all sectors, since the power industry is only 1 sector but the biggest. Anyway, it's one step at a time -- if we still have time.

 

"And as Plumer also points out, only 30 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions come from power plants. While they are the biggest single source, this plan would by itself would only cut total U.S. emissions 6 percent between 2013 and 2030.

"What that reveals, though, is not a lack of ambition in the Clean Power Plan but the need for carbon regulation in other sectors of the economy. Obama has also raised fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks. What the next president must do, and Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley has proposed to do, is regulate carbon emissions from industrial and agricultural sources."

Laura Rathe's curator insight, August 9, 2015 11:35 AM

Actually, the US has to do more, from all sectors, since the power industry is only 1 sector but the biggest. Anyway, it's one step at a time -- if we still have time.

 

"And as Plumer also points out, only 30 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions come from power plants. While they are the biggest single source, this plan would by itself would only cut total U.S. emissions 6 percent between 2013 and 2030.

"What that reveals, though, is not a lack of ambition in the Clean Power Plan but the need for carbon regulation in other sectors of the economy. Obama has also raised fuel efficiency standards for cars and trucks. What the next president must do, and Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley has proposed to do, is regulate carbon emissions from industrial and agricultural sources."

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El Niño 2015 could be strongest ever - Tempo - News in a Flash ("don't be the last to know; prepare!")

El Niño 2015 could be strongest ever - Tempo - News in a Flash ("don't be the last to know; prepare!") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
The El Niño weather phenomenon that began this year could be among the strongest in 65 years, US government scientists said Thursday.

El Niño comes with a warming in sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific, and can cause unusually heavy rains in some parts of the world and drought elsewhere.

This year’s El Niño began in March and is forecast to last about a year. Authorities in Australia have already predicted it would be “strong” and “substantial.”

That trend is still expected to continue, said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center, on a conference call with reporters to discuss the US agency’s latest forecast, released Thursday.

“What is new this month is we are predicting that this El Niño could be among the strongest El Niño in the historical record dating back to 1950,” said Halpert.

The reason for the forecast is the finding that three months of average sea surface temperatures in a key part of the equatorial Pacific “could potentially reach or even exceed two degrees Celsius above normal, which is 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit above normal, a value that we have only recorded three times in the last 65 years,” he said.
Such temperatures were previously seen in the 1972-73 season, 1982-83 and 1997-98.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 15, 2015 11:50 PM

Don't be the last to know. The Philippines is on El Niño's hit list.


"The last El Niño , five years ago, had a major impact: it triggered monsoons in Southeast Asia, droughts in southern Australia, the Philippines and Ecuador, blizzards in the United States, heatwaves in Brazil and killer floods in Mexico."

Laura Rathe's curator insight, August 16, 2015 8:36 AM

El Niño en 2015 puede ser el mas fuerte desde el 1950

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Military’s Shift Toward Renewable Energy ("this thinking should be adopted by country leaders too")

Military’s Shift Toward Renewable Energy ("this thinking should be adopted by country leaders too") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
As the largest consumer of energy in the U.S., the DoD has requisitioned the deployment of renewable energy to power military facilities by 2025.
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o achieve military operational success, the Department of Defense (DoD) relies on one mission-essential resource: energy. The DoD is the largest government consumer of energy in the United States, with petroleum-based liquid fuels composing approximately two-thirds of the DoD’s consumption.

The DoD has requisitioned the deployment of 3 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy to power military facilities by 2025.  This meets a larger DoD mandate, Title 10 USC § 2911, which directs at least 25 percent of any DoD facility energy consumption come from renewable energy sources. Implementing alternatives has evolved from increasing energy distribution costs, foreign oil dependency, the threat of energy supply disruptions and the need for more secure and clean energy generation and distribution.

The Army, the most populous branch of the military, consumes less energy than the Navy or Air Force because of the Army’s reliance on the Air Force and the Military Sealift Command for transportation.  The Army’s energy consumption is   concentrated in its installations, which consume an average of 21 million barrels of petroleum per year. The DoD’s shift toward energy security has encouraged Army energy initiatives, including the Army Energy Security Implementation Strategy, which requires at  least  five installations  meet “net-zero” energy goals by 2020 and deploy 1 GW of renewable  energy on their installations by 2025.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 23, 2015 10:19 PM

The military’s shift toward renewable energy is not just a political directive but also an operational imperative. Improvements toward energy alternatives can increase warfighter efficiency, enhance energy security and cut installation and operational energy costs. Between 2010 and 2012, DoD renewable energy projects increased 43 percent and are anticipated to exponentially increase over the next 20 years. DoD’s implementation of alternative energy and supporting infrastructure is one area where DoD is utilizing industry to promote research thus fortifying energy security across the nation.

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Hawaii’s Governor Dumps Oil and Gas in Favor of 100 Percent Renewables ("rolling out a 20-year target")

Hawaii’s Governor Dumps Oil and Gas in Favor of 100 Percent Renewables ("rolling out a 20-year target") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
At the Asia Pacific Resilience Innovation Summit held in Honolulu, Hawaii, this week, Governor David Ige dropped a bombshell. His administration will not use natural gas to replace the state’s petroleum-fueled electricity plants, but will make a full-court press toward 100 percent renewables by 20...

Ige’s decisive and ambitious energy vision is making Hawaii into the world’s most important laboratory for humankind’s fight against climate change. He has, in addition, attracted an unlikely and enthusiastic partner in his embrace of green energy—the US military.

Ige said Monday that LNG (liquefied natural gas) will not save the state money over time, given the plummeting prices of renewables. Moreover, “it is a fossil fuel,” i.e., it emits dangerous greenhouse gases. He explained that local jurisdictions in Hawaii are putting up a fight against natural gas, making permitting difficult. Finally, any money put into retooling electric plants so as to run on gas, he said, is money that would better be invested in the transition to green energy.

Ige, trained as an electrical engineer, is leading his state in the most ambitious clean-energy program in the United States. On June 8, he signed into law a bill calling for Hawaii’s electricity to be entirely generated from renewables in only 30 years. He also directed that the University of Hawaii be net carbon zero in just 20 years.

The state’s major utility, the Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO), is on board with the rapid turn to renewables and is partnering with the state and US military bases to meet the 2045 goal. Alan Oshima, the utility’s CEO, pointed out that 15 percent of homes in Hawaii already have rooftop photovoltaic panels, and he expected that number to triple.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 31, 2015 12:36 PM

Meet the climate warriors of Hawaii. They are setting a zero carbon target in 20 years. Way to go! Read and find out how they plan to attain their target.


"The steely vision of Governor Ige, the vigorous commitment of Hawaiian Electric Company, the inventiveness of the engineers and businessmen, and the can-do attitude of the generals and admirals on the state’s bases are creating an extraordinary public-private set of synergies that hold out hope that the worst climate-change scenarios can yet be avoided."

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Serving Dirty Interests

Serving Dirty Interests | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
ALEC's model policies fight climate change solutions at every turn.

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El Niño 2015 could be strongest ever - Tempo - News in a Flash ("don't be the last to know; prepare!")

El Niño 2015 could be strongest ever - Tempo - News in a Flash ("don't be the last to know; prepare!") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
The El Niño weather phenomenon that began this year could be among the strongest in 65 years, US government scientists said Thursday.

El Niño comes with a warming in sea surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific, and can cause unusually heavy rains in some parts of the world and drought elsewhere.

This year’s El Niño began in March and is forecast to last about a year. Authorities in Australia have already predicted it would be “strong” and “substantial.”

That trend is still expected to continue, said Mike Halpert, deputy director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center, on a conference call with reporters to discuss the US agency’s latest forecast, released Thursday.

“What is new this month is we are predicting that this El Niño could be among the strongest El Niño in the historical record dating back to 1950,” said Halpert.

The reason for the forecast is the finding that three months of average sea surface temperatures in a key part of the equatorial Pacific “could potentially reach or even exceed two degrees Celsius above normal, which is 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit above normal, a value that we have only recorded three times in the last 65 years,” he said.
Such temperatures were previously seen in the 1972-73 season, 1982-83 and 1997-98.


Via Bert Guevara
more...
Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 15, 2015 11:50 PM

Don't be the last to know. The Philippines is on El Niño's hit list.


"The last El Niño , five years ago, had a major impact: it triggered monsoons in Southeast Asia, droughts in southern Australia, the Philippines and Ecuador, blizzards in the United States, heatwaves in Brazil and killer floods in Mexico."

Laura Rathe's curator insight, August 16, 2015 8:36 AM

El Niño en 2015 puede ser el mas fuerte desde el 1950

Rescooped by George Thomas Farmer from Climate change challenges
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California's largest lake on the brink of environmental disaster

California's largest lake on the brink of environmental disaster | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Once a bustling tourist destination attracting more visitors than Yosemite, the Salton Sea is now fighting for survival.

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, July 19, 2015 11:22 AM

The Salton Sea is becoming "a post-apocalyptic landscape".

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Fox News Host Attacks Pope Francis For Addressing Climate Change

Fox News Host Attacks Pope Francis For Addressing Climate Change | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
RT @mmfa: Fox host calls Pope the "most dangerous person on the planet" for addressing climate change: http://t.co/yt3G9r2fjZ http://t.co/…;

Via Cathryn Wellner
George Thomas Farmer's insight:

What a bunch of right wingnuts at Fox. Watching Fox "news" makes one dumb and dumber.

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, June 21, 2015 11:20 AM

Fox News, in proud celebration of ignorance and greed

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G7 leaders bid 'Auf Wiedersehen' to carbon fuels

G7 leaders bid 'Auf Wiedersehen' to carbon fuels | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Leaders of the world's major industrial democracies resolved on Monday to wean their energy-hungry economies off carbon fuels, marking a major step in the battle against global warming that raises the

Via Cathryn Wellner
George Thomas Farmer's insight:

We need to elect those intelligent enough and with enough intestinal fortitude to do what is necessary about the warming world. Stop adding to the carbon cycle!

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, June 28, 2015 2:30 PM

The proof is in the pudding. Promises are a good beginning, but action is needed.

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Polar Bears to Start Dying Off in 10 Years, Thanks to Climate Change

Polar Bears to Start Dying Off in 10 Years, Thanks to Climate Change | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
As the world warms, the ice-free season in polar bears’ Arctic habitats grows longer and longer.

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Pope and mayors sign declaration on climate and trafficking ("alliance with cities is good action")

Pope and mayors sign declaration on climate and trafficking ("alliance with cities is good action") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it

Please find below the full text of the common declaration:

 

We the undersigned have assembled at the Pontifical Academies of Sciences and Social Sciences to address two inter-connected dramatic emergencies: human-induced climate change, and social exdusion in the extreme forms of radical poverty, modern slavery and human trafficking, We join together from many cultures and walks of life, reflecting humanity's shared yearning for prosperity, justice and environmental sustainability peace, happiness.
On the basis of the encyclical Laudato si', we have considered the over-whelming scientific evidence regarding human-induced climate change, the loss of biodiversity, and the vulnerability of the poor to economic, social and environmental disasters.
In the face of the emergencies attributable to human-induced climate change, social exclusion, and extreme poverty, we join together to declare the following:

Human-induced climate change is a scientific reality, and its effective control is a moral imperative for humanity.

In this core moral space, cities play a very vital role. All of our cultural traditions uphold the inherent dignity and social responsibility of every individual and the related common good of all humanity. They affirm the beauty, wonder and inherent goodness of the natural world, and appreciate that it is a precious gift entrusted to our common care, making it our moral duty to steward rather than ravage the garden that is our "common home". ...

The financing of sustainable development, including the effective control of human-induced climate change, should be bolstered through new incentives for the transition towards low-carbon and renewable energy, and through the relentless pursuit of peace, which also will enable a shift of public financing from military spending to urgent investments for sustainable development. ...

As mayors we commit ourselves to building, in our cities and urban settlements, the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reducing their exposure to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters, which foster human trafficking and dangerous forced migration. ...

 


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 22, 2015 9:30 PM

The alliances are set and the battle lines versus climate change have been drawn. The Pope is showing what it means to be a true "shepherd"!


"As mayors we commit ourselves to building, in our cities and urban settlements, the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reducing their exposure to climate-related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters, which foster human trafficking and dangerous forced migration."

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NASA: Pause Exists And Is Due To Ocean Heat Storage ("a temporary relief that has long-term impacts")

NASA: Pause Exists And Is Due To Ocean Heat Storage ("a temporary relief that has long-term impacts") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it

A new NASA study of ocean temperature measurements shows in recent years extra heat from greenhouse gases has been trapped in the waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans. Researchers say this shifting pattern of ocean heat accounts for the slowdown in the global surface temperature trend observed during the past decade.

Researchers Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis and Bill Patzert of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, California, found a specific layer of the Indian and Pacific oceans between 300 and 1,000 feet (100 and 300 meters) below the surface has been accumulating more heat than previously recognized. They also found the movement of warm water has affected surface temperatures. The result was published Thursday in the journal Science.

During the 20th century, as greenhouse gas concentrations increased and trapped more heat energy on Earth, global surface temperatures also increased. However, in the 21st century, this pattern seemed to change temporarily.

The Pacific Ocean is the primary source of the subsurface warm water found in the study, though some of that water now has been pushed to the Indian Ocean. Since 2003, unusually strong trade winds and other climatic features have been piling up warm water in the upper 1,000 feet of the western Pacific, pinning it against Asia and Australia.

"The western Pacific got so warm that some of the warm water is leaking into the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago," said Nieves, the lead author of the study.


Via Bert Guevara
more...
Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:15 AM

What will the effect on the surface be if the ocean gets warmer through the years? Read this very new report and find out.


"Now a new analysis by three ocean scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory not only confirms that the extra heat has been going into the ocean, but it shows where. According to research by Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis, and Bill Patzert, the waters of the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean warmed significantly from 2003 to 2012. But the warming did not occur at the surface; it showed up below 10 meters (32 feet) in depth, and mostly between 100 to 300 meters (300 to 1,000 feet) below the sea surface. They published their results on July 9, 2015, in the journal Science."

“Overall, the ocean is still absorbing extra heat,” said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. “But the top couple of layers of the ocean exchange heat easily and can keep it away from the surface for ten years or so because of natural cycles. In the long run, the planet is still warming.”

Bert Guevara's curator insight, July 28, 2015 12:17 AM

What will the effect on the surface be if the ocean gets warmer through the years? Read this very new report and find out.

 

"Now a new analysis by three ocean scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory not only confirms that the extra heat has been going into the ocean, but it shows where. According to research by Veronica Nieves, Josh Willis, and Bill Patzert, the waters of the Western Pacific and the Indian Ocean warmed significantly from 2003 to 2012. But the warming did not occur at the surface; it showed up below 10 meters (32 feet) in depth, and mostly between 100 to 300 meters (300 to 1,000 feet) below the sea surface. They published their results on July 9, 2015, in the journal Science."

“Overall, the ocean is still absorbing extra heat,” said Willis, an oceanographer at JPL. “But the top couple of layers of the ocean exchange heat easily and can keep it away from the surface for ten years or so because of natural cycles. In the long run, the planet is still warming.”

Rescooped by George Thomas Farmer from Climate & Clean Air Watch
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Obama to Unveil 'Most Important Step' Ever to Combat Climate Change ("Obama's last hurrah on climate")

Obama to Unveil 'Most Important Step' Ever to Combat Climate Change ("Obama's last hurrah on climate") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
President hails new regulations as "the biggest, most important step" ever taken to combat climate change

The White House plans to unveil regulations on Monday to dramatically curtail greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and eventually revamp the country’s energy industry. The regulations, billed by the President Obama as “the biggest, most important step” ever taken to address climate change, play a key role in the President’s aim to make combatting climate change a priority of his final months in office.

The Environmental Protection Agency rules, finalized versions of 2012 and 2014 proposals, call for a 32% reduction in carbon emissions from power plants by 2030 from 2005 levels. The White House projects that the rules will drive increased investment in renewable energy, leading to 30% more clean energy generation by 2030 and a dramatic reduction in coal power.

“No matter who you are, where you live or what you care about, climate change is personal and it’s affecting you and your family today,” EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy told reporters Sunday on a conference call.

The White House and environmental advocates have argued that the rule would stimulate the economy and create tens of thousands of jobs. Asked whether the EPA has the legal authority to implement the rule, McCarthy said that the agency had considered the legal issues and the measure is “legally a very strong rule.”

Monday’s news is one of many expected announcements from the White House designed to elevate the issue of climate change in the U.S. The President will highlight the issue in his meeting with Pope Francis this fall and his travel to Alaskan Arctic, and has announced a number of new policies and partnerships. All told, the attention is meant to position the U.S. as a leader in fighting climate change in the lead up to a United Nations conference on climate change in December.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:57 AM

The Philippines should take a cue from Pres. Obama on dealing with coal-powered energy plants. The bitter pill may actually be just what the doctor ordered.


"Monday’s news is one of many expected announcements from the White House designed to elevate the issue of climate change in the U.S. The President will highlight the issue in his meeting with Pope Francis this fall and his travel to Alaskan Arctic, and has announced a number of new policies and partnerships. All told, the attention is meant to position the U.S. as a leader in fighting climate change in the lead up to a United Nations conference on climate change in December."

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The World’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions in One Graphic ("shows the lop-sided distribution of emitters")

The World’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions in One Graphic ("shows the lop-sided distribution of emitters") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
An interactive graphic and database chronicles the greenhouse gas emissions for every country in the world.

Based on data from the WRI’s CAIT Climate Data Explorer, the graphic shows emissions data from 2012 by country. As a whole, the world emitted 42,386 megatonnes of greenhouse gases. Here’s how that number breaks down.

The top 10 list of emitters is no surprise. It includes China, the U.S., European Union 28, India, Russia, Japan, Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico and Iran. Together, they emit twice as much as the other 175 countries in the data, accounting for 72 percent of the globe’s emissions. The top two alone, China and the U.S., account for more than one-third of the world’s emissions.

 

Six of the top 10 emitters are developing countries. China, India, Indonesia, Brazil, Mexico and Iran account for 38 percent of the world’s emissions. While the lowest 100 countries emit less than 3 percent of the globe’s greenhouse gases.

The energy sector makes up about 76 percent of the world’s emissions. Of the countries with energy data available, three-quarters of them attribute a majority of their emissions to energy. The projected rise of wind and solar energy in the next 25 years is likely to reduce the impact of the energy sector. Agriculture and industry are the other largest sectors that add to global emissions.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 12, 2015 12:55 PM

For climate change students, here is an important source of data on carbon emitting countries. Check it out.

T@T lab's curator insight, March 25, 2016 4:42 AM

For climate change students, here is an important source of data on carbon emitting countries. Check it out.

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Air Pollution Causes 4,400 Deaths In China Every Single Day ("1/3 regularly breathes "unhealthy" air")

Air Pollution Causes 4,400 Deaths In China Every Single Day ("1/3 regularly breathes "unhealthy" air") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Air pollution is killing about 4,400 people in China every single day, according to a new study. Researchers from Berkeley Earth, a California-based climate research organization, calculated that about

Researchers from Berkeley Earth, a California-based climate research organization, calculated that about 1.6 million people in China die every year from health issues caused by the country’s notoriously polluted air. 

According to the study, more than one-third of the Chinese population regularly breathe air that would be considered “unhealthy” by U.S. standards.

“It’s a very big number,” the study’s lead author, Robert Rohde, told The Associated Press. “It’s a little hard to wrap your mind around the numbers.”

The study looked at four months of data from 1,500 ground stations across China, Taiwan and South Korea. The research is set to be published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS One. 

As The New York Times notes, air pollution -- particularly exposure to fine airborne particles -- can cause a variety of health problems, including asthma, lung cancer, heart disease and stroke. The World Health Organization said last year that 7 million people die annually because of exposure to polluted air.

China has struggled for years to control its air pollution problems, which are primarily caused by the burning of coal in factories and power plants, as well as vehicle use.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 17, 2015 10:19 AM

Prolonged air pollution damage to health will definitely kill you, either sooner or later.

 

"In April, Greenpeace reported that, of 360 cities in China, less than 10 percent had successfully met national air quality standards in the first quarter of 2015. 

"Previous studies have estimated that between 1.2 and 2 million people die due to air pollution in China every year."

T@T lab's curator insight, March 25, 2016 4:42 AM

Prolonged air pollution damage to health will definitely kill you, either sooner or later.

 

"In April, Greenpeace reported that, of 360 cities in China, less than 10 percent had successfully met national air quality standards in the first quarter of 2015. 

"Previous studies have estimated that between 1.2 and 2 million people die due to air pollution in China every year."

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World leaders must ‘accelerate’ climate talks: UN chief ("the feeling of urgency pervades over COP21")

World leaders must ‘accelerate’ climate talks: UN chief ("the feeling of urgency pervades over COP21") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Manila Bulletin, the nation's leading newspaper, brings you the latest news and current events in the Philippines and abroad daily, since 1900.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said Wednesday that countries must “accelerate the rhythm of negotiations” on capping global warming ahead of an international climate conference in Paris in December.

“We don’t have much time. There remain less than 100 days before the final negotiations,” he said, following a meeting with Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius in the French capital.

Both men expressed their “prudent optimism” that the climate conference in Paris would achieve its goal of an agreement capping warming at 2 degrees over the pre-industrial average.

“The countries have been negotiating for more than 20 years. The Paris conference is the final step during which they have promised to agree on an ambitious climate accord. There is no time to lose,” said Ban.

Fabius said the talks were “different to the others”.

“It’s a race against the clock. Last year was the hottest on record. It seems that this year will be even hotter. There is no plan B, there is no planet B.”

The UN’s COP21 conference runs from November 30 to December 11 in Paris, bringing together leaders from around the world as they try to improve on failed negotiations at the last UN climate conference in Copenhagen in 2009.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, August 31, 2015 4:44 AM

There is no room for failure or a watered-down agreement, otherwise, it is everyone for himself.


“The countries have been negotiating for more than 20 years. The Paris conference is the final step during which they have promised to agree on an ambitious climate accord. There is no time to lose,” said Ban.

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In Week of Cyclone Records, Kilo Could Break More ("more el niño typhoons as the pacific warms")

In Week of Cyclone Records, Kilo Could Break More ("more el niño typhoons as the pacific warms") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Typhoon Kilo has already broken tropical cyclone records in an El Nino-fueled season, and rivals the longest-lived storms on record.

It’s been a banner week for tropical cyclones (the umbrella term for hurricanes and typhoons), with records set left and right thanks in part to a strong El Niño. And more potential records could be in store if Typhoon Kilo keeps on keeping on.

Prior to Sept. 1, Kilo was one of a trio of Category 4 hurricanes in the northeastern Pacific — a record clustering for any ocean basin. Kilo and one of the other storms, Ignacio, were both in a subregion known as the central north Pacific, sitting at opposite ends of the Hawaiian Islands. That pairing marked another first; never before had two Category 3 storms been in that area at the same time, according to hurricane researcher and forecaster Phil Klotzbach of Colorado State University.

Then Kilo crossed over the International Date Line, a rare, but not unprecedented, event that meant it was considered a typhoon and not a hurricane (the phenomena are the same, but are called different names in different ocean basins). What made the event particularly notable was that Kilo was the third such storm to make the crossing this season, the most storms of any season on record.

Now, as Kilo is expected to continue its westward journey, it could become one of the longest-lived storms on record. It has already been around for 14 days and is expected to carry on for another 7 to 10. It will have to last a few days longer than that to top the current title holder, Hurricane John, which spun across the Pacific for 30 days in 1994, beginning in the east Pacific off the coast of Mexico continuing on past the International Date Line before cutting back into the northeast Pacific.

 


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, September 6, 2015 9:40 PM

The Philippines isn't clear yet of these typhoons which is ravaging the Pacific due to El Niño. It's fortunate that the current typhoons are doing their damage outside the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR).


"The area around Hawaii, and the broader central Pacific, tends to see more storms in El Niño years. The previous record for named storms forming in there was in 1982, with four; 2015 has already seen five tropical cyclones."

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How to make people care about climate change? Tell it one story at a time

How to make people care about climate change? Tell it one story at a time | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Organizer Christine Cordero explains how storytelling can supercharge your activism.

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Laura Rathe's curator insight, September 5, 2015 1:07 PM

Contar las historias que mueven a la acción

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The pope, climate change and the cultural dimensions of the Anthropocene

The pope, climate change and the cultural dimensions of the Anthropocene | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
The ink is still drying on the Pope’s Encyclical Letter “Laudato Si’” or “On Care for Our Common Home,” and scholars, critics and pundits will analyze and assess it for years to come. But one aspect of…

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Act on climate change now, top British institutions tell governments

Act on climate change now, top British institutions tell governments | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Joint letter by 24 scientific, medical and engineering bodies say mitigation will also bring economic and health benefits

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G7 Carbon Goal May Come Too Late, Scientists Say ("severe effects will already take place very soon")

G7 Carbon Goal May Come Too Late, Scientists Say ("severe effects will already take place very soon") | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
Leading scientists say the G7's decarbonization goal may be too little too late considering the pace at which greenhouse gas emissions are warming the planet.

“Decarbonization by the end of the century may well be too late because the magnitude of climate change long before then will exceed the bounds of many ecosystems and farms, and likely will be very disruptive,” Kevin Trenberth, senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., said.

The goal is a step in the right direction, but not very meaningful considering greenhouse gas emissions need to be reduced dramatically within the next decade, well ahead of the G7’s timeline, Michael Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University, said.

“In my view, the science makes clear that 2050 or 2100 is way too far down the road,” he said. “We will need near-term limits if we are going to avoid dangerous warming of the planet.”

The leaders of the G7 nations met at an economic summit over the weekend and declared on Monday that in order to keep global warming to the world’s main climate goal of 2°C (3.6°F), the global economy must end its reliance on fossil fuels by the end of the century, with emissions from most of them disappearing within 35 years.

Without mapping out exactly how emissions can be cut so dramatically, the nations said they support the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) recommendation that global greenhouse gas emissions be slashed to 40 to 70 percent below 2010 levels by mid-century, and the Paris climate talks, known as COP21, should set binding rules to track countries’ progress toward that goal.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, June 25, 2015 9:45 PM

The present targets and plans may be too slow, too late. A zero-emissions policy is needed now to have any significant impact, according to scientists, but that of course will almost be impossible.


“COP21 and all of its predecessors have set the agenda and raised awareness. That is valuable, but will not solve the problem or slow climate change,” he said. “I think the transition to a renewable resource-based economy will need to take place sooner than 2100, but it is useful to articulate a vision of a fossil fuel-free economy.”

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Climate Change Will Soon Turn Deadly for Americans, Experts Say - IVN.us

Climate Change Will Soon Turn Deadly for Americans, Experts Say - IVN.us | Climate Change Science | Scoop.it
We see the warning signs -- severe weather patterns, extreme droughts -- but if Americans don't act on climate change, it could cost Americans more than money.

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Cathryn Wellner's curator insight, July 2, 2015 11:33 PM

Unless you're a right-leaning Republican, corporate polluter, or ostrich, of course, in which case everything is just fine.

George Thomas Farmer's curator insight, July 3, 2015 9:03 PM

If the AMOC slows further or stops completely the East Coast of the US is in grave danger.