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More green spaces can reduce environmental impact of urban growth - eco-business.com

More green spaces can reduce environmental impact of urban growth - eco-business.com | Rubbish Generated by Us | Scoop.it
More green spaces can reduce environmental impact of urban growth eco-business.com The recently released Draft Master Plan by the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) has promised more green spaces around planned new neighbourhoods, and experts say...
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Population Growth, Climate Change Putting More People at Risk - Huffington Post

Population Growth, Climate Change Putting More People at Risk - Huffington Post | Rubbish Generated by Us | Scoop.it
Population Growth, Climate Change Putting More People at Risk
Huffington Post
The suffering in the Philippines right now in the wake of Super Typhoon Haiyan is simply heartbreaking. The death toll is expected to reach at least 4,500.
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Fast population growth has littered our genomes with five times as many rare gene variants as would be expected

Fast population growth has littered our genomes with five times as many rare gene variants as would be expected | Rubbish Generated by Us | Scoop.it

Most Mutations in the Human Genome are Recent and Probably Harmful. Our genomes are strewn with millions of rare gene variations, the result of the very fast, very recent population growth of the human species. From an estimated 5 million individuals just 10,000 years ago, we ballooned to more than 7 billion. On average, every duplication of the human genome includes 100 new errors, so all that reproducing gave our DNA many opportunities to accumulate mutations. But evolution hasn’t had enough time to weed out the dangerous ones: gene variants that might make us prone to illness, or simply less likely to survive. 

 

Joshua Akey of the University of Washington recently explored the average age of our species’s gene variants, finding that most are very young. About three-quarters of single nucleotide variants — a mutation that substitutes just one nucleotide (an A, C, T or G) in the long string of DNA — occurred within the past 5,000 years, surprising considering that our species may be 200,000 years old. Using several techniques to gauge the effects of these mutations, which are the most common type of variant in the human genome, Akey estimated that more than 80 percent are probably harmful to us. 

 

All of these mutations — roughly 100 billion for each generation in the entire population — potentially accelerate the pace of evolution by giving it more raw materials with which to work. A small percentage may be beneficial; abilities such as digesting milk in adulthood and living at high altitude are recent acquisitions of the human genome. Given how many mutations are now circulating among living humans, we may be evolving new capabilities already.

 

Akey says determining the age of our mutations is made possible only by the stupendous increase in gene sequencing speed and power. Just a few years ago, this kind of experiment was inconceivable.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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WalkerKyleForrest's curator insight, August 28, 2013 9:58 AM

This article talks about how our population rising rapidly is related to gene mutations in our species. The higher the population rises, the higher the chance of mutations is. These mutations can have harmful effects such as causing life expectancies to as little as 25 years in some cases. Also these mutations can cause some people to become prone to illness, depending on thier region and whats around them. This article also predicts the worlds total population to be as high as 9 billion in the year of 2050.

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Environment impact assessment changed 100 times in less than 7 years - Hindustan Times

Environment impact assessment changed 100 times in less than 7 years - Hindustan Times | Rubbish Generated by Us | Scoop.it
Environment impact assessment changed 100 times in less than 7 years Hindustan Times The Environment Impact Assessment (EIA) notification, the bible for the environment approval process, has undergone changes more than 100 times in less than seven...
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Rubbish in Sutton 'uncollected for three weeks' - This is Local London

Rubbish in Sutton 'uncollected for three weeks' - This is Local London | Rubbish Generated by Us | Scoop.it
This is Local London
Rubbish in Sutton 'uncollected for three weeks'
This is Local London
Valerie Tate, of Peaslake Court, Egmont Road, Sutton, has reported the problem to the council over the last two weeks.
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