Classroom Rules and Routines
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How do rules and routines in the classroom support learning?

Welcome to my Scoop.it site. 

 

This page will provide Early Stage 1 teachers with learning and teaching resources for the HSIE syllabus outcome:

 

Social Systems and Structures

SSES1: Identifies ways in which their own needs and the needs of others are met, individually and cooperatively. 

- classroom rules and routines

 

Indicators for the activities presented include:

- identifies their own rights, roles and responsibilities and those of others at home and in the classroom

- demonstrates an awareness of the rights of others

- participates in the formation of classroom rules and routines

- follows class and school rules

 

Enjoy!

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8ways - Behaviour management

8ways - Behaviour management | Classroom Rules and Routines | Scoop.it
Cindy's insight:

8 Ways of Learning is an Aboriginal pedagogical framework, put together by the Indigenous community of Western New South Wales. 8ways provides a cultural supportive framework for the learning needs of Indigenous students in schools. Integrating the framework into school programs can be particularly helpful for teachers when including Indigenous perspectives into classroom content as the framework encourages teaching and learning through culture as opposed to merely teaching about culture. It encourages teachers to reach out and include the local Indigenous community in school programs to provide and benefit students with authentic and quality learning experiences (NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, 2003).

 

This Scoop can be used by teachers when formulating classroom rules with students. Similar to Lightning Ridge Central School, teachers can consult with Elders in their local community to develop meaningful symbols to represent the different rules of their classroom and to explain the significance of the symbols in Aboriginal culture. When engaging in this activity, teachers must ensure that it is embedded within SOSE programs in a way that is culturally appropriate to minimize the trivialization of Indigenous knowledge (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). This means that teachers need to prepare students with the relevant content knowledge before such activities so that students approach the learning experience with cultural awareness and respect; in this way, the learning process is optimized as students have the ability to highly engage with the learning experience. This activity can then be linked to other key learning areas such as English –where students write about their experiences- or Mathematics, -where students focus on how symbols can be used to represent different things. 

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed). South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning.

 

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Officer Buckle - YouTube

Cindy's insight:

Officer Buckle and Gloria by Peggy Rathmann lends itself beautifully to an introductory lesson on classroom rules and why it is so important. The humourous plot and colourful illustrations of the picture book allow students to engage with the text and effectively make meaning from it.  The book highlights to students that rules are needed to keep people safe and out of harms way and that rules need to be followed for it to be effective.  Allowing students to view the picture book through this YouTube video will make it more interesting and engaging as the narration is accompanied by creative sound effects and additional dialogue to support the story.

 

Although this is a great electronic resource, teachers should also have a hard copy of the text so that students can analyse how the illustrations and the text work together to tell the story and communicate the author's purpose of the text.

 

Prior to reading this book, teachers can ask students to identify rules that they are aware of either at home, in the community, at school or some other place.  Students can then analyse the cover of the book and predict what the story is about. Doing this is critical for student learning as it sets the scene of the story, providing students with greater understanding.(Winch, Johnston, March, Ljungdahl & Holliday, 2010)

 

Following a reading of this text, teachers can discuss who makes rules, the importance of having rules and the consequences of breaking rules. Students can complete an activity that requires them to create a poster about an important rule that they think should be enforced in the classroom and then present it to the class. 

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R. S., March, P., Ljungdahl, L, & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy: reading, writing and children's literature (4th Ed.). Victoria: Oxford University Press.

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Around The World | TIME For Kids

Around The World | TIME For Kids | Classroom Rules and Routines | Scoop.it
December 2013 Family Edition
Cindy's insight:

This site is a great classroom resource for incorporating global perspectives when learning about classroom routines. The site allows students to browse and observe the routines of school students from different countries around the world by selecting a country and clicking on “Day in the Life”, located in the navigation column on the left side of the page. There are an array of countries to choose from, including countries in Africa, Asia, Central America, Europe, North America, South America, Middle East and even Australia and New Zealand. Not only can students see a day in the life of other students, they can also gather general statistical information, pictures and information of famous sites and the history of major events of their chosen country.  

 

A lesson idea that incorporates this resource can ask students to compare their daily routine to that of other students. The teacher can introduce the lesson by probing questions that make students aware that everyone has a different daily routine, although some may be very similar. Then teachers can communicate how children from around the world also have daily routines that can be similar or different to the students in the classroom. The teacher can then navigate through the website and allow students to choose a country and look at a day in the life of a student from that country. Teachers may ask questions such as how is your daily routine different to that of this student? How is it similar? The teacher can help students represent this using a Venn diagram or a table to show how some of the routines are different and how some of them are similar. For an assessment idea, teachers can ask students to write simple sentences that state one similar routine the student shares with the observed student and one that is different. Teachers can scaffold this by writing an example of a sentence on the board to guide students with their writing.

 

A different activity might be to have students write up their daily routines, indicating significant times such as, breakfast, going to school, watching a favourite show, eating dinner, going to sleep etc., using the website as an example. This makes curricula links to Mathematics as students engage with the concept of time. 

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Back to School

Back to School | Classroom Rules and Routines | Scoop.it
Back to school activities, classroom rules, and getting to know you activities.
Cindy's insight:

This Scoop provides a link to a downloadable interactive whiteboard file/activity that can be incorporated into the daily routine of a Kindergarten classroom. Activities included in this particular file allow teachers to revise school times, classroom rules, classroom routines etc. Before you can download this file, you will need to sign up (for free) for a new account if you don’t already have an existing one. You can then download this file or several other files on the site, free of charge. This is a great and friendly site for teachers to share their interactive resources!

 

It has become evident that integrating ICT in the classroom can have significant benefits on student learning when used effectively (Marzano, 2009). This not only prepares students to become proficient users of technology –a necessary skill for future generations- but it has the potential to increase student engagement and academic achievement (Papert, 1996). Teachers can use or adapt this activity in their classrooms or easily create a similar activity, using SMART Notebook so that it is more specific to their school and their classroom.

 

One engaging and interactive activity teachers can take from this Scoop is the Vortex activity. This activity requires students to correctly identify the “Dos” and the “Don’ts” in their classroom by dragging each statement into the correct vortex. If students correctly place an item, an applause with be heard; if students incorrectly place an item, it will be spat out. This is great as it provides students with immediate feedback that can then turn into class discussion/revision points. For example, why doesn’t “run around the classroom” go into the “Dos” vortex? Teachers can reiterate the use of rules to create safe environments for themselves and for others. 

 

Other activities teachers may include:

-       Roll call: On the interactive whiteboard have the equation

Boys + Girls = _____

Choose a student to count and record the number of boys present in the class and another student to count and record the number of girls present in the class. Then together, students will add the numbers together to calculate the total number of students in the class.

-       Day, date and weather: On the interactive whiteboard, have a table with 3 statements: Today is ___________; the date is ___________;

the weather is __________.

Have days, numbers, months and pictures of the different weather conditions so that students can drag the corresponding day, date and weather at the beginning of each day. 

 

Marzano, R. J. (2009). The art and science of teaching: teaching with interactive whiteboards. Multiple measures, 67(3), 80-82.

 

Papert, S. (1996). The connected family: Bridging the digital generation gap. Georgia: Longstreet Press. 

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Creating Classroom Rules Together | Scholastic.com

Creating Classroom Rules Together | Scholastic.com | Classroom Rules and Routines | Scoop.it
Students are more likely to buy into the rules if they have a hand in creating them. Start with this list of adaptable ideas.
Cindy's insight:

The Scholastic site provides an abundance of resources for teachers ranging from lesson ideas/plans to student activity links. This particularly link is useful for teachers to read before making classroom rules. It encourages teachers to begin the school year by having students participate in the development of the classroom rules as well as the consequences for breaking those rules. It is noted that these rules need to be CLEAR and SPECIFIC.

 

Involving students in the making process of classroom rules is an effective strategy to hold them accountable for their own actions and are thus it encourages them to take responsibility for the whole classroom community, that is, their own behaviour and the behaviour of others. Establishing rules and routines with students helps to promote a positive classroom climate (Marsh, 2010).

 

Teachers should work towards maintaining a positive classroom environment by minimising the opportunities for students to break the rules. However, it is important to note that the consequences for breaking rules need to be followed each time a rule is broken. This will ensure consistency across disciplinary actions for all students.

 

An activity that teachers can use to follow the class creation of the classroom rules is to have students decorate the rules before it is laminated and displayed around the classroom. Teachers can also photocopy the classroom rules so that students can have a copy to take home and also to stick in their workbooks so that it is always accessible to them. 

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues (5th Ed.). Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia. 

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