Classroom Management for beginning teachers
93 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ashlee Smith
Scoop.it!

Developing a relationship with your students

In recent years the authoritarian approach is becoming less common, while a more learner centred approach, more concerned with student’s needs, is slowly taking over. Constructive relationships between student and teacher stem from positive learning environments which are in turn essential for learning. A balanced classroom in regards to students feeling just as significant as their teacher proves to be a fair understanding of a well-functioning classroom. A child’s learning as a student would be best enhanced by teachers taking the pedagogy approach of being on the same level as the students, going on the ‘educational journey’ with them and being ‘co travellers.’ In non-generalizing terms, students’ desire to learn will diminish if teachers place and or regard themself with higher importance than their students. This ‘hand in hand’ approach consists of the teacher valuing each child in his/her classroom, providing students with opportunity/power such as allowing them to establish rules alongside their teacher, the teacher constantly walking around the room glancing at all their students work, asking questions and offering when needed, compared to the teacher sitting at a desk and waiting for children to come to them and ask a question.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashlee Smith
Scoop.it!

Making connections- getting to know your student's 'Funds of Knowledge'

A teacher forming a strong relationship with their student’s parents or guardians is a crucial part in improving classroom management. Open lines of communication must be established early as the distance between a student’s home life and school should be reduced as much as possible resulting in the student being able to comprehend a working relationship between their parents and teacher. It is part of a teacher’s job to obtain a basic understanding of their student’s funds of knowledge. Good classroom management skills require that understanding of the levels of their students (Yisrael, 2012). Additionally, teachers need to be aware of the factors that influence the lives of their students outside of school and should incorporate students’ personal interests into academics. The funds of knowledge of children can be made aware of in many ways such as surveys, informal conversations and taking notice of the activities that they take part in outside of school (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 59-63). Students are more likely to enjoy school work if they find it interesting and enjoy the content so this should be taken into account by the teacher when preparing work for their students. As we live in a diverse society, it is not surprising that every student will be different in regards to the way they learn best, so it is important for teachers to be able to slightly adjust their teaching style to cater for the needs of different students.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashlee Smith
Scoop.it!

Rules and Norms

Rules and Norms | Classroom Management for beginning teachers | Scoop.it

The first part of classroom management is rules. Rules and norms deal with the broad areas of respect and courtesy as well as more specific issues (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 5-13), and are essential for an effective classroom that operates smoothly and so that students can be aware of the expectations by their teacher. At the beginning of the school year students should be asked why rules and norms are important and this should be noted down: so everyone can learn, no one gets hurt, everyone is fairly treated etc. Formally making a set of rules for the classroom should involve student participation as well as that of the teachers so that students are aware of the rationale behind each rule and norm and are seen as fair to them. Students should be asked to construct their own rules and then they should be simplified, revised and or added to and in turn should be clear, specific and convey classroom expectations. Basic rules that need to be a part of every classroom are raise your hand to speak, keep your hands feet and objects to yourself and respect and care for others like you would like to be treated yourself. When everyone agrees upon the set of rules established, they should be placed somewhere in the classroom that is easy for students to see them at any time and in which they display a degree of validity. These norms need to be consistently reinforced which can be done in several ways: modelling the procedures, talking about why rules are important to follow several times throughout the year as well as providing feedback to students in regards to their approach to following the rules (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 5-13). Values are also a very important part of any classroom: participation, diligence and collaboration and it is vital that students understand the meanings of each. To effectively implement rules and norms into the classroom, teachers should mentally visualise the ways in which they would like their classroom to operate in regards to delivery of instructions, student behaviour and participation.

 

Feldman(2008) states that a classroom management plan will include a philosophical statement about your beliefs as a teacher, a room arrangement map, classroom rules, classroom procedures and a description of how to manage your students in diverse situations.

 

Image- screenshot- (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 p. 12)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashlee Smith
Scoop.it!

References

 

How New Teachers Can Manage a Classroom: Effective Classroom Management Plan Helps Control Student Behavior | Suite101.com. 2012. How New Teachers Can Manage a Classroom: Effective Classroom Management Plan Helps Control Student Behavior | Suite101.com. [ONLINE] Available at: http://suite101.com/article/how-new-teachers-can-manage-a-classroom-a180269. [Accessed 10 June 2012].

 

Feldman, A 2008, ‘The classroom management plan’, retrieved 8 June 2011,

<http://people.umass.edu/~afeldman/beingnewteacher/sampleplan.html>

 

Marzon, R, Gaddy, B, Foseid, M, Foseid, M, Marzano, J 2005 A handbook for
classroom and behaviour management that works, ACSD, Virginia, USA.
Introduction & Section 1 (pages 1-100)

 

 Yisrael, S, 2012. Classroom management : a guide for urban school teachers. 1st ed. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Education.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashlee Smith
Scoop.it!

Consequences- Teacher reaction to poor behaviour

Another part of proficient classroom management involves dealing with discipline. After a set of rules and procedures have been communicated to students, the teacher’s own personal beliefs and perspectives will aid them in deciphering a set of consequences (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 37-40). One of the biggest concerns that relates back to the classroom is the way in which children are disciplined in response to disrupting a functioning classroom resulting in detracting from other students learning experiences. Early in the teaching year, teachers need to clearly communicate to their students that it is not appropriate to defy instructions or expected behaviour and that there will be a set of specific consequences if this is to occur. Teacher reaction: verbal and non-verbal cues, to inappropriate behaviour are vital at the time of an offence and needs to foreworn students that the behaviour being currently displayed will be punished if continued (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 37-40 ). Disciplining a student for doing the wrong thing; blatantly ignoring classroom procedures, will lead the class to have the idea instilled that this type of behaviour will be punished if the message the teacher portrays is clear and consistent. This is crucial to do at the start of your teaching career as students will often play on the fact that the new teacher lacks confidence in their ability to successfully manage a classroom (How New Teachers Can Manage a Classroom, accessed June 9th 2012).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashlee Smith
Scoop.it!

Daily Routine

Classroom management is enhanced when routines are established that communicate order and learning. The beginning of a school day should start off with a balance of general classroom procedures such as “administrivia” and learning (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 15-17 ). Learning at the beginning of the day should involve activities that allow students to get in a working mood such as daily starters, for example fun worksheets, classroom monitors, silent reading or group activities. Throughout the day, students should participate in various activities that cover all areas of study, and the timing of the activities relating to each area of study should be started at the same time each day so students will eventually develop a predictable learning environment. For example, Literacy groups may be scheduled at 12:00pm each day and each day at this time students will know what they have and what materials and instructions they need to get started. If students finish a task before everyone else, it is the teacher’s responsibility to make them aware of what they are expected to do when they have completed that particular task. Once again, like the activities that are consistently implemented at the beginning of the day, the activities at the end of the day should also be regular. There are many ways to end the school day, the teacher could involve the class in group discussions in regards to what they had learnt during the day, cleaning up, reminding students of what is coming up in the next few days or handing in homework tasks (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 15-17).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashlee Smith
Scoop.it!

The Reward System- Reinforcing Positive Behaviour

Reinforcing positive behaviour is just as important as disciplining poor behaviour when it comes to classroom management. Once again verbal and non-verbal cues are used in a different way to applaud appropriate behaviour. Short verbal affirmations such as “good work” and “well done” are a great way of conveying to students that you are appreciative of their efforts and emphasize to them that what they are doing is the right thing to do in regards to their education. None the less non-verbal cues can have the have the same intended effect: smiles, winks and other positive symbols (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 40-44 ). Another way in which provides students with the understanding that they are portraying respectable behaviour is tangible rewards such as concrete symbols and or tokens (Marzon, Gaddy, Foseid & Marzano, 2005 pp. 40-44). To give you an additional understanding of this system, fine examples of this include point systems, certificates and free time.

more...
No comment yet.