Classical Hollywood Style Film 2700
1.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Casablanca - Memories of Paris/ Flashback Device

Casablanca uses flashbacks to introduce a memory sequence of a character in the film, which is a reoccuring device in CHC.

 

This short clip relives Bogie's unforgettable memories of romance in Paris with Ilsa.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

"Stranger on the Third Floor" (1940) - Dream Sequence Device

In "Stranger on the Third Floor" a young reporter name Michael Ward is haunted by the the knowledge that he may have sent an innocent man to the electric chair for murder and that means the real maniac is still on the loose! Was the wrong man condemned? Then Michael's next door neighbor is also murdered, and in an ironic twist of fate, is Micheal the real maniac? And who is that bugged-eyed stranger on the third floor? (http://www.noiroftheweek.com/2007/11/strangers-on-third-floor-1940.html)

 

 

Even though at the time of release "The Stranger on the Third Floor" wasn't considered the "first" film noir but just a "minor" low-budget "B" feature(s) film. Today it is often credited by most film critics, film historians, and film "buffs" as being the "first" film noir.

(http://www.noiroftheweek.com/2007/11/strangers-on-third-floor-1940.html)

 

The dream sequence is a first of it's kind during this time period. This device is still commonly used today in films.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Citizen Kane: Camera Moving Through Objects/ Device

Orson Welles directed Citizen Kane. It was nominated for 9 Academy Awards and was voted the  greatest film of all time in five consecutive Sight & Sound's polls of critics.  (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_Kane)

 

In the movie, Welles allows his camera to move through objects it shouldn't. In this scene the camera is moving through a restaurant sign and a glass ceiling.

 

This "moving through scenes that it shouldn't" is very prevalent in films today, and can be credited to Orson Welles.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Classical Hollywood cinema - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Classical Hollywood cinema - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Classical Hollywood Style Film 2700 | Scoop.it

This Wikipedia page gives a great detail of the style of CHC and it's narrative. It also tells of the way that CHC films were produced, and gives a great listing of some CHC films.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

The Maltese Falcon - Invisible Style

Film noir claims to be many things, a genre, style, mood, or cycle, and is influenced from German Expressionism.

 

The Maltese Falcon is a story that follows a San Francisco private detective and his dealings with three unscrupulous adventurers, all of whom are competing to obtain a jewel-encrusted falcon statuette. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Maltese_Falcon_(1941_film))

 

The Maltese Falcon has been named as one of the greatest films of all time by Roger Ebert and Entertainment Weekly, and was cited by Panorama du Film Noir Américain as the first major film noir. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Maltese_Falcon_(1941_film)

 

Notice the invisible style in this clip. The camera follows the actor around the room, he never looks at the camera and the camera angle is at eye level.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

10 Greatest Film Noirs of All Time

10 Greatest Film Noirs of All Time | Classical Hollywood Style Film 2700 | Scoop.it

Film noir is not an easy genre to pin down, yet it is strangely recognisable. We think of long shadows and smoke dancing, tough guys in fedoras and dames.

This is an article that gives a listing of the writers 10 Greatest Film Noirs of All Time. There are so many to choose from, but a few of the ones listed in the article are on our Scoop.IT! 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Repo Man (1984) - Kiss Me Deadly & Pandora's Box

This clip is to show the correlation between "Kiss Me Deadly" and
Repo Man".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Bringing up Baby 1938 - Howard Hawks/ Screwball Comedy

"Bringing Up Baby" is an American screwball comedy film directed by Howard Hawks, starring Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant, and released by RKO Radio Pictures. (As taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bringing_Up_Baby)

 

The film is a story about a paleontologist named David (Cary Grant) who is trying to find one last bone to finish a certain dinosaur collection and land a $1 million dollar grant. He meets Susan (Katharine Hepburn) who has a pet leopard named "Baby". The film basically follows the two of them as they get into unimaginable situations and somehow manage to find their way out of them together. It is a comedic film, but it is also a love story. 

 

Screwball comedy is a principally American genre of comedy film that became popular during the Great Depression, originating in the early 1930s and thriving until the early 1940s.

 

Many secondary characteristics of this genre are similar to the film noir, but it distinguishes itself for being characterized by a female that dominates the relationship with the male central character, whose masculinity is challenged. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screwball_comedy_film)

 

This movie has other examples of Classical Hollywood Cinema style including: once again Howard Hawks as the director, Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn as actors (two very popular actors seen during this time period), impossibility and unlikely situations in everyday life (pet leopard) and screwball comedy (the situations they get into are somewhat random, yet hilarious), a frusturating love story (in that the two lovers don't realize they're in love until the end and the entire film they're driving each other crazy)

 

To show once again the versatility of Howards Hawks as a director, we can contrast "Bringing Up Baby" with "Scarface" and "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." (Screwball Comedy/ Love Story, Drama/Noir, Comedic Musical)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Double Indemnity (1944) - Sexual Innuendo after Hays Code

In this clip of "Double Indemnity", the director uses innuendo to portray how the actors are attracted to each other.

 

This film was released after the "Hays code" which was enforced strictly in 1934.

 

This code prohibited "sex perversion” (homosexuality), the demonstration of drug abuse, offensive language, excessive on-screen violence, explicit adultery, and anything overtly sexual in nature. 

more...
Briana Printup's curator insight, April 3, 2013 4:38 AM

Unable to show explicit adultery or anything overtly sexual, the movie "Double Indemnity" which was released after the Hays Code was in place and strongly enforced uses innuendo to portray the actors attraction to one another. This movie acts as a great example of what films would do in order to stay within the Hays code guidelines.

Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Citizen Kane - Low Angle Shot/ Flashback Device/Mise-en-Scene

This video is an example of a specific "mise-en-scene" since it is shot at a low angle. Mise-en-scene is basically how the scene is shot, (What type of lighting is used in the scene?, Where are the actors and how are their bodies and faces looking? , What are they looking at and how do they feel? How is the camera moving? Where is the camera looking at the actors from?).

 

The viewer is looking up at Kane and Jedediah (his best friend) as they are talking about going to Chicago and how Kane is self centered. A self centered character is prevalent in the Film Noir period.

 

Also, this shot is a flashback in the film, which is a usual device in Classical Hollywood Films during this time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Classical hollywood systems

As we know, the "Golden Age" in Hollywood films was from roughly 1920 to the late 1960s. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_Hollywood_cinema)

 

Films around the early 1940's - 1960's are considered Classical Hollywood Cinema.

 

The two major film studios during this time were Universal Studios and Warner Brothers, and of course they are still very important studios today.

 

This article describes the role that each company took in the film industry during this time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

The Breakfast Club [1985] - Opening Scene

In the 1985 film, The Breakfast Club, the opening shot is very much a signature Classical Hollywood Narrative Style signature. It starts with a wide shot of the high school. The next shot closed in on some closer shots of the interior of the school. Finally we are introduced to the main cast at the end of the opening sequence. This beginning of the movie is stemmed from Classical Hollywood Style, which begins the same way and then introduces the films' problem or conflict very early on in the film.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Out of the Past 1947 - Film Noir/ Femme Fatale

Out of the Past provides a classic example of film noir, especially in its portrayal of women. This film has flashbacks, voice-over, a very fatale femme, a private eye, brilliant black-and-white photography, and that overwhelming sense of doom that comes with the genre. (http://www.filmnoirstudies.com/essays/progressive.asp)

 

Kathie, the ultimate femme fatale, propels the action toward disaster, first by trying to escape from her relationship with Whit, then by manipulating the two men who would try to love or control her; Ann, on the other hand, acts as the idyllic but featureless traditional woman, standing by her man even when he tells her that he is mixed up with murder and another woman. (http://www.filmnoirstudies.com/essays/progressive.asp)

 

 

This film is an excellent example of the femme fatale. Kathie and Ann are contrasted to show that even thought Kathie has all of the negative characterisitcs of a femme fatale (greed, dishonesty, committing murder) she is a much more interesting character than Ann, who is the traditional woman. 

 

Kathie is the strong, independent femme fatale, yet this type of character was just coming about during this time in CHC.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

"KISS ME DEADLY" (1955) - Film Noir/Cold War Paranoia

Critical commentary generally views "Kiss Me Deadly" as a metaphor for the paranoia and nuclear fears of the Cold War era in which it was filmed. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiss_Me_Deadly)

 

The movie is described as "the definitive, apocalyptic, nihilistic, science-fiction film noir of all time – at the close of the classic noir period." (http://www.filmsite.org/kiss.html)

 

This film has many symbolic allusions, and shows much paranoia about atomic bombs and the Cold war.

 

It has all the elements of great film noir - a stark opening sequence, destructive femme fatales, low-life cheap gangsters, an anti-hero, expressionistically-lit night-time scenes, a vengeful quest, and a dark mood of hopelessness. (http://www.filmsite.org/kiss.html)

 

Future films such as Repo Man and Pulp Fiction reuse the "Pandora's Box" device, as taken from this movie.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Carolyn Cooper Comstock
Scoop.it!

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) - Howard Hawks/ Comedic Musical

 

In "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes", two singers, best friends Lorelei Lee and Dorothy Shaw travel to Paris pursued by a private detective hired by Lorelei's fiancé's disapproving father to keep an eye on her, a rich, enamoured old man and many other doting admirers.

 

(As taken from http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045810/)

 

This post gives a few examples of Classical Hollywood Cinema: comedic gags and musical numbers, women at the forefront of the film (in roles other than the everyday), Howard Hawks as the director, men being ridiculed and jokes made at their expense.

 

More about the Director:

Howard Hawks is now looked at as one of the most important directors during the CHC period. He directed 47 movies from a time period of 1926-1970. He also helped write 25 movies, and produced 22, many of those being films that he also directed. (Example: Scarface)

 

Hawks was the type of director who didn't stick to a certain genre. He directed Scarface in 1932, which launched his career as a director, and later on directed Gentlemen Prefer Blondes in 1953. The contrast of these two films is just one example of what a versatile director Hawks was.

 

Fun Fact:

During this time, Howard Hawks was not looked at as a visionary. It wasn't until later on that his works were appreciated. It took the French "Cahiers du Cinema" critics to teach America to appreciate one of its own masters, and it was to the Academy's credit that it recognized the great Hawks in his lifetime. (As taken from http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0045810/)

more...
No comment yet.