Clara Barton
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Clara Barton
Founder of the American Red Cross
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Clara Barton: determined and inspiring

Clara Barton: determined and inspiring | Clara Barton | Scoop.it

In 1837, Clara Barton became a teacher in Oxford, Massachusetts and enjoyed her profession for many years. In 1850 following her decision to further pursue studies in writing and languages at the Clinton Liberal Institute in New York, she opened a free school in New Jersey (one of the first free schools in the nation). Frustrated after the board hired a man as head of the school instead of her, she moved to Washington DC. In 1854 Barton was employed at US patent office (which was very unusual for a woman; the position paid well and needed to be held by someone who was responsible). On April 21, 1861, nine days after the start of the American Civil War, a trainload of Union soldiers was mobbed by Confederates in Baltimore, MD and arrived in Washington DC full of dead and wounded with no baggage or supplies. Knowing that several soldiers would be friends that she had grown up with in MA, Barton, her sister, Sally, and several others, rushed to tend to the wounded soldiers who were being quartered in the US Senate chamber in Washington. Barton began rallying door-to-door at shops in Washington for donations of food, clothes, medical supplies (like bandages) and more. Soon after she began printing ads in newspapers spreading the word and asking for contributions that she could distribute to the soldiers in Washington. In July 3, 1861 received first official permission to distribute her materials directly to troops in the field. This was Barton's first active work in supporting the military, even 20 years before the Red Cross was founded. Throughout the war, the extent of her work continually increased as her desire to help increased as well. She assembled a team of emergency medical workers and transportation that was ordered to work relentlessly. Near the war's end, she proposed that a national cemetery be created around the graves of the Union men who died in the notorious Andersonville Prison in Georgia and that the graves be marked where names were known.

After a 1869 visit to Europe and an immediate call to action in 1870 with the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian war, Barton assisted the already established Red Cross ally itself with war for the first time, providing relief to injured soldiers in Strasbourg. Upon returning to America after the war, Barton, with the help of Swiss officials who recognized her leadership abilities and innovation, established the Red Cross in America.

Historians recall Barton (and her early work) as being selfless and determined to help others without ever wishing to receive personal gratification or recognition. This was most likely her most admirable quality that helped her achieve a great amount of success without having personal ego and need for acknowledgement slowing down her work. She also started her work in order to help the people who she had grown up with and were close to her, showing her true compassion for her fellow man. She also continued her work passionately and risked her life on the fronts of the battlefields (in order to give immediate treatment to injured men and increase the likelihood of a successful recovery.) Her continued dedication to a cause that she cared deeply about is proof of her innovation and ability to create positive change in the world.

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A Story Of The Red Cross: Glimpses Of Field Work

A Story Of The Red Cross: Glimpses Of Field Work

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Amazon.com: A Story Of The Red Cross: Glimpses Of Field Work

 

Clara Barton wrote a book about her war experiences and helping the soldiers.  It is available on Amazon.

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Works Cited

“Clara Barton: Founder of the American Red Cross.” American Red Cross. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2012. <http://www.redcross.org/‌museum/‌history/‌claraBarton.asp>.
“Clara Barton: The Beginnings of the American Red Cross.” Youtube. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2012. <http://www.youtube.com/‌watch?v=7k0D01ODDFAhttp://>.
“Compassion Under Fire.” New York Times. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2012. <http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/‌2011/‌12/‌09/‌compassion-under-fire/‌?ref=clarabarton>.

<http://amazon.com>.

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American Red Cross

American Red Cross | Clara Barton | Scoop.it
The American Red Cross helps prepare communities for emergencies and keep people safe every day thanks to caring people who support our work. Please support your local Red Cross.

 

This article talks about how Clara Barton first heard of the Red Cross while she was in Europe and brought the idea back to the US to help the soldiers during the Civil War.

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Clara Barton: The Beginnings of the American Red Cross

 

This video has legitimacy and relevancy because it was posted directly to youtube by the American Red Cross foundation. It contributes to Clara Barton's story by painting a very descriptive and informative explanation of the historical context and reasoning for Barton's initial involvement in the American Civil War and nursing.

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War Experiences

War Experiences | Clara Barton | Scoop.it
The amazing Civil War career of Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross.

 

This article from The New York Times is relevent because it talks about how Barton worked as a freelance nurse during the Civil War, along with cooking food, changing sheets, cleaning, creating lanterns that were used for surgeries, and being a motherly figure to the soldiers.  As the article states, "In other words, Barton did a lot of everything desperately needed to be done."

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