CHS9 Geography
28 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Amy Knoles Moore
Scoop.it!

Here's Why There Are So Many German-Americans In The US

Here's Why There Are So Many German-Americans In The US | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
The largest ancestry group there is.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Super Bowl rooting interests

Super Bowl rooting interests | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
Facebook Data Science wrote a note titled NFL Fans on Facebook. Read the full text here.

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:30 AM

Who is rooting for which team in the Super Bowl?  How does regional geography play a role in this distribution of the data captured in this map? 

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:46 AM

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Hong Kong and China: Growing apart?

Hong Kong and China: Growing apart? | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
The BBC's John Simpson reports from Hong Kong, where the former colony's increasing independent-mindedness is worrying Beijing.

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Steven Sutantro's curator insight, December 20, 2012 9:06 PM

Interesting facts...that's the interdependence concept of Geography..

Bill Chen's comment, December 22, 2012 9:20 AM
http://www.myairmaxpascher.com/
Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 23, 2013 8:34 PM

Hong Kong has a mix of Chinese heritage and culture and British ideals. They lived under the British rule for so long that they grew accustomed to the British government system and freedoms. When the UK handed Hong Kong over to China, the people of Hong Kong were afraid that the Chinese government would step in and put them under the same system as the rest of China. China decided to allow Hong Kong to have its own system, but Hong Kong still fears China stepping in and forcing them to change and conform to the rules of the rest of China. Hong Kong is now seeing some protesting and some tension from its people about becoming truly Chinese. They do not want to be Chinese, and they do not want to be British either. They want to form their own country. However, it is highly unlikely that China will let Hong Kong go, but I do wonder if the ideals of Hong Kong, like elections, will slowly spread to the rest of China and create tensions that will cause a change in the Chinese government altogether.

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013

The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013 | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it

"The map [above] sorts the countries of the world into three groups based on their relative coup risk for 2013: highest (red), moderate (orange), and lowest (beige)."


Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 10:11 AM

While this is not predicting a coup in any of these places, this map is a visualization of data that was used to assess the factors that would make a coup likely (to see an alternate map, here is the Washington Post's review of the same data that mapped the 30 countries most likely to have a coup). 


Questions to Ponder: What factors do you think would be important in compilling data of this nature?  What makes a country susceptible to this type of governmental overthrow?  What creates governmental stability? 


Tags: political, conflict, unit 4 political, governance, Africa.

wereldvak's curator insight, January 26, 2013 5:28 AM

Factoren die meespelen zijn hieronder genoemd.

 

The algorithm for successful coups uses just four risk factors, one of which is really just an adjustment to the intercept.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Degree of democracy (Polity score, quadratic): higher risk for countries in the mid-range of the 21-point scale.Recent coup activity (yes or no): higher risk if any activity in the past five years.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.

The algorithm for any coup attempts, successful or failed, uses the following ten risk factors, including all four of the ones used to forecast successful coups.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Recent coup activity (count of past five years with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more activity.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.Popular uprisings in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Insurgencies in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Economic growth (year-to-year change in GDP per capita): higher risk with slower growth.Regime durability (time since last abrupt change in Polity score, plus one and logged): lower risk with longer time.Ongoing insurgency (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Ongoing civil resistance campaign (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Signatory to 1st Optional Protocol of the UN’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (yes or no): lower risk if yes.

from:http://dartthrowingchimp.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/assessing-coup-risk-in-2012/ ;
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

A tortuous triangle

A tortuous triangle | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
SNAKING their way from Kirkuk, a city 240 kilometres (150 miles) north of Baghdad, through Kurdistan and across Turkey’s eastern region of Anatolia to the...

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 20, 2012 1:01 PM

Why does the Kurdish population, despite being a territorially contiguous population, unable to control their own destiny?  They are often caught in other geopolitical struggles of the Middle East because:

  1. they are divided between 4 countries (Syria, Iraq Iran and Turkey).  
  2. The mountanous terrain also divides the Kurds
  3. Oil resources ensure that outside forces will fight to control this area 


Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps

Manifest Destiny in 141 Maps | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it

This data visualization project is a great way to demonstrate the geographic expansion of the United States.  This is much more interactive than the typical time lapse video since you can scroll through the maps and explore each map through the interactive features. 

 

Tags: historical, USA, visualization, mapping.


Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 11:24 AM
I really like the display of these changes in our country throughout the years. It's a great way of showing centuries of change into something easy to understand. This would help young students in a social studies class for sure.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:35 PM
i LOVE THIS! I can see this being such a valuable tool to use in a classroom. Students get the visual and written representation. Having the visual changes that took place in the United States is a better way to present to the students instead of them just reading a book. Will definitely save this article for future reference.
benjamin costello's curator insight, April 29, 2015 6:36 PM

This is great idea. I wonder if I can use something like this for my project.

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Gerrymandering

Gerrymandering | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
Discover how gerrymandering makes the reapportionment and redistricting of congressional districts unfair.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Can Europe Survive the Rise of the Rest?

Can Europe Survive the Rise of the Rest? | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
The European Union will never manage to compete with China and other rising powers unless it unites politically, scales up and becomes a genuine giant.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

Via Joel Barker, Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 2013 8:23 AM

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Internet History Sourcebooks

more...
Amy Knoles Moore's curator insight, February 14, 2013 11:01 AM

Whoop, Whoop Wallerstein

Scooped by Amy Knoles Moore
Scoop.it!

Transfer-related metaphors are harsh, even in context - St. Louis Beacon

Transfer-related metaphors are harsh, even in context
St.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amy Knoles Moore
Scoop.it!

Teens turn lens on 'shocking' poverty

Teens turn lens on 'shocking' poverty | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
By Lou Dubois, NBC News What a difference 20 miles makes. In Detroit, the median household income is $27,862, and 57 percent of the children live below the poverty line.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

A Layman's Geography Guide to the Most Confusing Region Of the World: Iran

A Layman's Geography Guide to the Most Confusing Region Of the World: Iran | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
Iran's geography plays heavily in the foreign affairs issues it is a part of, and the policies it makes.

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:44 PM

"Iran sits smack in the middle of one of the most important geopolitical regions on Earth. Much of its western flank is bordered by either Iraq or the Persian Gulf, and it has considerable control over one of the world’s most important waterways for oil shipping and trade, the Strait of Hormuz." 


Given it's context, Iran is a country that students should know beyond the three main facts that that most Americans are aware of (Iran has an Islamic-based government, an emerging nuclear program and a ton of oil).  This article is a good starting point. 


Tags: Iran, political, Middle East.

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

NFL fans by U.S. county, according to Facebook

NFL fans by U.S. county, according to Facebook | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
On the surface Facebook is a social network, but those in the know recognize that it's actually one of the largest datasets of human trends, preferences and activity ever catalogued.

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 7:27 AM

This is a crowd-sourced map of NFL fans is very different from this more stylized version

Heather Ramsey's curator insight, January 31, 2013 2:27 PM

This map shows fans of NFL teams by county. The data was collected from Facebook posts and people's pages. What patterns do you see for the fans in states that do not have a professional football team? In states that DO have a pro team, does everyone root for the home team? Why would a state have fans who root for another team? (Think geographically.)

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey

As Kurds Fight for Freedom in Syria, Fears Rise in Turkey of Following Suit

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Joshua Choiniere's comment, December 18, 2012 11:23 AM
This is really interesting professor
Eliana Oliveira Burian's curator insight, December 28, 2012 6:34 AM

How to handle it?

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:10 PM

what i find interesting about this is that both syria and turkey are trying to remove the kurds from their countries. neither country will allow more kurds to immigrate into their land, but both are encouraging them to leave and go fight in the other country. the kurds seem to not care which country they live in as long as they are all together but no country wants them.

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin

Op-Ed: Redistricting in Wisconsin | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
Shaped like a giant pistol sitting on its butt end, Wisconsin's new 22nd state Senate District is Exhibit A in the case against partisan redistricting.

 

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be far we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?


Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 1:02 PM

The redistricting process is far from neutral; to be fair we should remember that gerrymandering is has happened on all ends of the political spectum.  Which map to you think is the best way to divide these districts?  What is the fairest way to divide them?

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

The Elephant in the Map Room

The Elephant in the Map Room | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is the knottiest border problem of all.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’ | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world’s newest country: South Sudan.

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:51 PM

This is a really interesting dynamic to look into, as it's not everyday the process of founding a country can be seen at work. That's a true once in a lifetime experience for those involved, and is likely one of the harder jobs in the entirety of history.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:46 AM

This video and article highlight the steps a new country takes when it is carved out of an old one.  The problems and tribulations the new country faces and how it responds to the rest of the international community will decide if it will be a long lasting country or just a blip on the road of the original countries history.

Kendra King's curator insight, March 15, 2015 6:33 PM

I think building a country from scratch mostly needs a plan for strong governance. Some of the items mentioned in the video would eventually be necessary (i.e. an anthem or a flag), but not exactly a top priority as the country could function without these. Rather the items like taxes and training the police are hugely important. A society needs the revenue to grow and the police to keep order. However, what disturbed me about this video is there were no other real mention of government institutions. Now I am not saying that the Constitution needs to be exactly like the United States, but the following is needed: a plan for how to treat the citizens, implement social programs, create/review the law, get officials into office, etc. Without looking at these basic questions of government, there is no way the country can function because there aren’t actually the procedures in place when problems do arise.

 

After strong governance, I also think that recognition in our globalized world is needed as well. In order for a country to prosper, the country will need to rely on other nations at one point in time for things like trading. If enough countries just refused to recognize the area and as such refused to trade then the country would more than likely fail. Luckily, Sudan is recognized by the United States and the UN did come to speak with the nation. SO that doesn’t seem to be an issue.

 

To me these are the top two things needed and since one is greatly missing, I am not surprised by the problems Sudan has.  

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Is Mali the next Afghanistan?

Is Mali the next Afghanistan? | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the title


Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 21, 2013 11:28 AM

Some cultural background on the group that is at the center of the latest political turmoil in the Sahel region in Africa.

Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Peacocks at Sunset

Peacocks at Sunset | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
The weird, violent history of the Indo-Pakistani border.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amy Knoles Moore from Political Organization
Scoop.it!

Enclaves

Enclaves | CHS9 Geography | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

Via Seth Dixon, Amy Knoles Moore
more...
Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!