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Dormant Prostate Cancer Cells May be Reawakened by Factors Commonly Produced in Inflammatory Cells

Researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute discovered in pre-clinical models that dormant prostate cancer cells found in bone tissue can be reawakened, causing metastasis to other parts of the body. Understanding this mechanism of action may allow researchers to intervene prior to disease progression.

 

"Understanding how and why dormant cells in bone tissue metastasize will aid us in preventing the spread of disease, prolonging survival and improving overall quality of life," said Chia-Yi "Gina" Chu, PhD, a researcher and postdoctoral fellow in the Uro-Oncology Research Program and lead author of the study published in the journal Endocrine-Related Cancer.

 

In the study, investigators found that cancerous cells in the bone were reawakened after exposure to RANKL, a signaling molecule commonly produced by inflammatory cells. Researchers then genetically engineered cells to overproduce RANKL and found that these cells could significantly alter the gene expression of surrounding dormant cells in lab studies and in laboratory mice, causing them to transform into aggressive cancer cells.

 

Researchers then injected these engineered RANKL cells directly into the blood circulation of laboratory mice, which caused dormant cells within the skeleton to reawaken, creating tumors within the bone. When the RANKL receptor or its downstream targets were blocked, tumors did not form.


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Dormant Prostate Cancer Cells May be Reawakened by Factors Commonly Produced in Inflammatory Cells

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 3, 2014 12:39 PM

Dormant Prostate Cancer Cells May be Reawakened by Factors Commonly Produced in Inflammatory Cells

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The future of medicine means part human, part computer

The future of medicine means part human, part computer | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
It may sound a little bit futuristic and far-fetched, but the reality is that ingestible sensors and implantable chips are already in use.

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ehealthgr's curator insight, December 27, 2013 2:09 PM

Do check this article also: http://www.cnbc.com/id/101042045/page/11

Chandler George's curator insight, December 30, 2013 11:29 AM

We can't escape so we must use as Chiropractors and Dentists to help patient get healthy!

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Dormant Prostate Cancer Cells May be Reawakened by Factors Commonly Produced in Inflammatory Cells

Researchers in the Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute discovered in pre-clinical models that dormant prostate cancer cells found in bone tissue can be reawakened, causing metastasis to other parts of the body. Understanding this mechanism of action may allow researchers to intervene prior to disease progression.

 

"Understanding how and why dormant cells in bone tissue metastasize will aid us in preventing the spread of disease, prolonging survival and improving overall quality of life," said Chia-Yi "Gina" Chu, PhD, a researcher and postdoctoral fellow in the Uro-Oncology Research Program and lead author of the study published in the journal Endocrine-Related Cancer.

 

In the study, investigators found that cancerous cells in the bone were reawakened after exposure to RANKL, a signaling molecule commonly produced by inflammatory cells. Researchers then genetically engineered cells to overproduce RANKL and found that these cells could significantly alter the gene expression of surrounding dormant cells in lab studies and in laboratory mice, causing them to transform into aggressive cancer cells.

 

Researchers then injected these engineered RANKL cells directly into the blood circulation of laboratory mice, which caused dormant cells within the skeleton to reawaken, creating tumors within the bone. When the RANKL receptor or its downstream targets were blocked, tumors did not form.


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Dormant Prostate Cancer Cells May be Reawakened by Factors Commonly Produced in Inflammatory Cells

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:59 PM

Dormant Prostate Cancer Cells May be Reawakened by Factors Commonly Produced in Inflammatory Cells

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Sleep's Best-Kept Secret: A Treatment for Insomnia That's Not a Pill

Sleep's Best-Kept Secret: A Treatment for Insomnia That's Not a Pill | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Why behavior therapy isn't used more, and what your smartphone can do about that

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Sleep's Best-Kept Secret: A Treatment for Insomnia That's Not a Pill

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MyHealthShare's curator insight, February 1, 2014 10:03 AM

Sleep's Best-Kept Secret: A Treatment for Insomnia That's Not a Pill | http://sco.lt/...http://myhealthshare.org @myhealthshare @appinsomnia

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Geranium extracts inhibit HIV-1

Geranium extracts inhibit HIV-1 | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

 

Scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München demonstrate that root extracts of the medicinal plant Pelargonium sidoides (PS) contain compounds that attack HIV-1 particles and prevent virus replication. A team spearheaded by Dr. Markus Helfer and Prof. Dr. Ruth Brack-Werner from the Institute of Virology and Prof. Dr. Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin from the Analytical BioGeoChemistry research unit (BGC) performed a detailed investigation of the effects of PS extracts on HIV-1 infection of cultured cells. They demonstrated that PS extracts protect blood and immune cells from infection by HIV-1, the most widespread type of HIV. PS extracts block attachment of virus particles to host cells and thus effectively prevent the virus from invading cells. Chemical analyses revealed that the antiviral effect of the PS extracts is mediated by polyphenols. Polyphenol mixtures isolated from PS extracts retain high anti-HIV-1 activity but are even less toxic for cells than the crude extract.

 


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Geranium extracts inhibit HIV-1

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New Concern About Testosterone and Heart Risks

New Concern About Testosterone and Heart Risks | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
A large new study found that prescription testosterone raised the risk of heart attacks in older men and in middle aged men with a history of heart disease, prompting some experts on Wednesday to call for more extensive warning labels on the drugs.

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New Concern About Testosterone and Heart Risks

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Vegetable and fruit intake after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer progression

Vegetable and fruit intake after diagnosis and risk of prostate cancer progression | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Cruciferous vegetables, tomato sauce, and legumes have been associated with reduced risk of incident advanced prostate cancer. In vitro and animal studies suggest these foods may inhibit progression of prostate cancer, but there are limited data in men. Therefore, we prospectively examined whether intake of total vegetables, and specifically cruciferous vegetables, tomato sauce, and legumes, after diagnosis reduce risk of prostate cancer progression among 1,560 men diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer and participating in the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor, a United States prostate cancer registry. As a secondary analysis, we also examined other vegetable sub-groups, total fruit, and subgroups of fruits. The participants were diagnosed primarily at community-based clinics and followed from 2004–2009. We assessed vegetable and fruit intake via a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire, and ascertained prostate cancer outcomes via urologist report and medical records. We observed 134 events of progression (53 biochemical recurrences, 71 secondary treatments likely due to recurrence, six bone metastases, four prostate cancer deaths) during 3,171 person-yrs. Men in the fourth quartile of post-diagnostic cruciferous vegetable intake had a statistically significant 59% decreased risk of prostate cancer progression compared to men in the lowest quartile (hazard ratio (HR): 0.41; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22, 0.76; p-trend: 0.003). No other vegetable or fruit group was statistically significantly associated with risk of prostate cancer progression. In conclusion, cruciferous vegetable intake after diagnosis may reduce risk of prostate cancer progression.


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Clinical trials are underway for what could be a first-of-its-kind blood test that would help doctors determine what caused a patient to have a stroke.

Clinical trials are underway for what could be a first-of-its-kind blood test that would help doctors determine what caused a patient to have a stroke.


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MyHealthShare's curator insight, January 29, 2014 8:03 AM

Clinical trials are underway for what could be a first-of-its-kind blood test that would help doctor...http://sco.lt/...@robincarey

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Three Cancer Drugs Don't Work Properly Without Gut Bacteria

Three Cancer Drugs Don't Work Properly Without Gut Bacteria | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Your gut is home to tens of trillions of bacteria. Collectively, they act as another organ, one with many different roles. They influence your body weight, your ability to digest your food, your risk of catching infectious diseases, your chances of resisting infections or autoimmune diseases, the development of your brain, and more.

 

Now, we can add an entry to this growing list. At least in mice, gut bacteria can influence whether cancer treatments work.

 

Working independently, two teams of scientists showed that three cancer treatments rely on gut bacteria to mobilise the immune system and kill tumour cells—not just in the gut, but also in the blood (lymphomas) and skin (melanomas). Remove the bacteria with antibiotics, and you also neuter the drugs.

 

“It was a surprise,” says Romina Goldszmid from the National Cancer Institute, who led one of the studies. “Nobody would ever have thought we should worry about gut bacteria when thinking about treating cancer.”


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Three Cancer Drugs Don't Work Properly Without Gut Bacteria

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Researchers discover a tumor suppressor gene in a very aggressive lung cancer

Researchers discover a tumor suppressor gene in a very aggressive lung cancer | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

The Genes and Cancer Group at the Cancer Epigenetics and Biology Program of the IDIBELL has found that the MAX gene, which encodes a partner of the MYC oncogene, is genetically inactivated in small cell lung cancer. Reconstitution of MAX significantly reduced cell growth in the MAX-deficient cancer cell lines. These findings show that MAX acts as a tumor suppressor gene in one of the more aggressive types of lung canc

 

 

In addition to identifying the tumor suppressor role of MAX in lung cancer, the group led by Montse Sanchez-Cespedes has unveiled a functional relationship between MAX and another tumor suppressor, BRG1, in virtue of which BRG1 regulates the expression of MAX through direct recruitment to the MAX promoter. However, the functional connection is even more complex. On one hand, the presence of BRG1 is required to activate neuroendocrine transcriptional programs and to up-regulate MYC-targets, such as glycolytic-related genes. Moreover, the depletion of BRG1 strongly hinders cell growth, specifically in MAX-deficient cells, heralding a synthetic lethal interaction. The preferential toxicity of the inactivation of BRG1 in MAX-deficient lung cancer cells opens novel therapeutic possibilities for the treatment of SCLC patients with MAX-deficient tumors.

 

 


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Symptoms of mineral deficiency

This is only an illustrative list. Please note that minerals supplements work best with co-factors and nearly all minerals can occur in a human body unless one is eating deficient foods/processed foods.


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Symptoms of mineral deficiency

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Arun Shrivastava's curator insight, January 8, 2014 8:23 AM

Dr. Joel Wallach

On his tape entitled: "Dead Doctors don't lie", Dr. Wallach, BS, DVM, ND., a veterinarian doctor, says, "Every animal or human that died of natural causes died of a mineral deficiency".

Symptoms of mineral deficiency according to Dr. Wallach:

Calcium deficiency: Facial muscles are sagging, osteoporosis sets in. The following also develop, according to natural pre-dispositions: heel spurs, kidney stones, calcium deposits, cramps and twitches, PMS, lower back pain. Arthritis is osteoporosis of the joint ends of the bones (in 80% of all cases).

Chromium deficiency: Man develops 'Pica' an unnatural craving for chocolate, sweets and other substances such as pickles, dirt etc.

Bismuth deficiency: Heals ulcers (Helicobacter pilori) together with some tetracycline (antibiotic). You can also use Manuka honey.

Selenium deficiency: Together with Vitamin E, Beta-carotene and Selenium, more than 13% of all cancers can be cured according to a Chinese study. This also cures cardio-myopathy (heart attack) and 'liver' spots.

Boron deficiency: Kidney stones are symptoms of a raging calcium deficiency. This condition is quickly cured with addition of calcium (please, not calcium carbonate), magnesium and boron. Addition of this mineral also helps regulate testosterone and estrogen hormone production.

Copper deficiency: Ruptured aneurysms, a ballooning of blood vessels, a weakening of the fibers of arteries, strokes - can always be cured by the addition of copper. Gray hair also disappears then. So do vericose veins and sagging body parts.

Chromium and vanadium deficiency: Low blood sugar, diabetes.

Tin deficiency: Male baldness

Zinc deficiency: Loss of smell and taste. Loss of male libido.

Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, January 20, 2014 12:22 AM

Symptoms of mineral deficiency

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Santé : le Sativex, médicament dérivé du cannabis, autorisé en France

Santé : le Sativex, médicament dérivé du cannabis, autorisé en France | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Une autorisation de mise sur le marché a été accordée au Sativex, un médicament dérivé du cannabis, destiné à soulager certains patients atteints...

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Santé : le Sativex, médicament dérivé du cannabis, autorisé en France

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Comment le patient 2.0 devient acteur de sa santé

Comment le patient 2.0 devient acteur de sa santé | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Les technologies dans la santé sont en passe de bouleverser le rapport entre médecins et patients.

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MyPharmaCompany's curator insight, January 17, 2014 3:20 AM

Un problème : qui monitore ces données et pour quel prix !

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Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes

Pancreatic adenocarcinomas are among the most malignant forms of cancer and, therefore, it is of especial interest to set new strategies aimed at improving the prognostic of this deadly disease. The present study was undertaken to investigate the action of cannabinoids, a new family of potential antitumoral agents, in pancreatic cancer. We show that cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human pancreatic tumor cell lines and tumor biopsies at much higher levels than in normal pancreatic tissue. Studies conducted with MiaPaCa2 and Panc1 cell lines showed that cannabinoid administration (a) induced apoptosis, (b) increased ceramide levels, and (c) up-regulated mRNA levels of the stress protein p8. These effects were prevented by blockade of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor or by pharmacologic inhibition of ceramide synthesis de novo. Knockdown experiments using selective small interfering RNAs showed the involvement of p8 via its downstream endoplasmic reticulum stress–related targets activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4) and TRB3 in Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol–induced apoptosis. Cannabinoids also reduced the growth of tumor cells in two animal models of pancreatic cancer. In addition, cannabinoid treatment inhibited the spreading of pancreatic tumor cells. Moreover, cannabinoid administration selectively increased apoptosis and TRB3 expression in pancreatic tumor cells but not in normal tissue. In conclusion, results presented here show that cannabinoids lead to apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells via a CB2 receptor and de novo synthesized ceramide-dependent up-regulation of p8 and the endoplasmic reticulum stress–related genes ATF-4 and TRB3. These findings may contribute to set the basis for a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.


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Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes

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The State of the World’s Children 2014 in Numbers

The State of the World’s Children 2014 in Numbers | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Revealing disparities and advancing children’s rights with consistent and credible data. Because every child counts.

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MyHealthShare's curator insight, February 4, 2014 7:39 AM

The State of the World’s Children 2014 in Numbers | @scoopit http://sco.lt/...http://myhealthshare.org @myhealthshare @unicef #children #myhealthshare

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Silibinin reverses drug resistance in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells

Silibinin reverses drug resistance in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) has a dismal prognosis in part because of multidrug resistance (MDR). Silibinin is a flavonolignan extracted from milk thistle (Silybum marianum), extracts of which are used in traditional medicine. We tested the effects of silibinin on drug-sensitive (H69) and multi-drug resistant (VPA17) SCLC cells. VPA17 cells did not show resistance to silibinin (IC50=60μM for H69 and VPA17). Flow cytometry analysis after incubation in 30μM silibinin showed no changes in cell cycle phases in VPA17 or H69 cells compared with untreated cells. Silibinin (30μM) incubation was pro-apoptotic in VPA17 cells after >3days, as measured by ELISA of BUdR labeled DNA fragments. Apoptosis was also indicated by an increase in caspase-3 specific activity and decrease in survivin in VPA17 MDR cells. VPA17 cells had increased Pgp-mediated efflux of calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein AM); however, this was inhibited in cells pre-incubated in silibinin for 5days. Pre-incubation of VPA17 cells in 30μM silibinin for 5days also reversed resistance to etoposide (IC50=5.50 to 0.65μM) and doxorubicin (IC50=0.625 to 0.035μM). The possible synergistic relationship between silibinin and chemotherapy drugs was determined by exposure of VPA17 cells to 1:1 ratios of their respective IC50 values, with serial dilutions at 0.25 to 2.0×IC50 and calculation of the combination index (CI). Silibinin and etoposide showed synergism (CI=0.46 at ED50), as did silibinin and doxorubicin (CI=0.24 at ED50). These data indicate that in SCLC, silibinin is pro-apoptotic, reverses MDR and acts synergistically with chemotherapy drugs. Silibinin, a non-toxic natural product may be useful in the treatment of drug-resistant SCLC.


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Silibinin reverses drug resistance in human small-cell lung carcinoma cells

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Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric

Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

What a firestorm! Ever since Dr. Paul Offit's book, "Do you Believe in Magic: The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine" was released last summer, there's been a burst of new negative dietary supplement study results and position papers. Editorials, featuring provocative headlines such as: Enough is Enough: Stop Wasting Money on Vitamin and Mineral Supplements and Don't Take Your Vitamins, have been published in prominent medical journals and major media outlets, many authored or co-authored by the omnipresent Offit, himself.

 

In response to the loud and growing chorus of conventional and academic physicians opposing dietary supplementation, The Council for Responsible Nutrition, Natural Products Association and Life Extension Foundation have released their own statements.

 

This article attempts to break through the din and unremitting confusion sown by the media whir around dietary supplements, the industry that champions their use and public health in general.

 

First, a few disclosures: FON Therapeutics currently consults and collaborates with several nutraceutical companies. I also admit to personally ingesting a significant amount of supplements ever since working at a mom and pop health food store in 1980, and in even greater quantities when diagnosed with 'incurable' leukemia in 1991.

Can I objectively write on this topic? You be the judge.

 

My success achieving complete remission of chronic lymphocytic leukemia without traditional intervention and using quality nutraceuticals as part of a comprehensive, personalized integrative cancer therapy regimen has been well-documented by my oncologist, Lee Nadler, MD, a Harvard Medical School dean and one of the World's largest NIH funded investigators for cancer and HIV/AIDS.


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Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:38 AM

Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric

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From common colds to deadly lung diseases, one protein plays key role.

From common colds to deadly lung diseases, one protein plays key role. | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

An international team of researchers has zeroed in on a protein that plays a key role in many lung-related ailments, from seasonal coughing and hacking to more serious diseases such as MRSA infections and cystic fibrosis.

 

The finding advances knowledge about this range of illnesses and may point the way to eventually being able to prevent infections such as MRSA.

 

The key protein is called MUC5B. It’s one of two sugar-rich proteins, with similar molecular structure, that are found in the mucus that normally and helpfully coats airway surfaces in the nose and lung. The other is MUC5AC.

 

“We knew these two proteins are associated with diseases in which the body produces too much mucus, such as cystic fibrosis, asthma, pulmonary fibrosis and COPD,” said researcher Chris Evans, PhD, an associate professor in the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “We also knew that many patients with asthma or COPD have as much as 95 percent less MUC5B in their lungs than healthy individuals, so we wanted to see if one of these is the bad player in chronic lung diseases.”


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Curcumin reduces urinary side effects of radiation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

Curcumin reduces urinary side effects of radiation therapy in prostate cancer patients. | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

The Journal of Cancer Science & Therapeutics recently reported the outcome of a pilot trial of curcumin in prostate cancer patients which found a protective effect for the compound against the development of urinary symptoms caused by radiation therapy. While radiation therapy is frequently and effectively employed in prostate cancer, it can result in adverse effects, which can limit the dose of radiation administered.

 

Curcumin, derived from the spice turmeric, has been shown to help protect against the harmful effects of radiation while enhancing radiotherapy's benefit in cancerous cells. The present study included forty men with prostate cancer who were randomized to three grams per day BCM-95® curcumin divided between three meals or a placebo beginning one week prior to external beam radiotherapy and continuing until its completion. Quality of life questionnaires administered before radiotherapy and three months after its cessation assessed urinary and other functions.

 

Urinary symptoms were significantly worse after three months among men who received a placebo. However, individuals who received curcumin experienced milder symptoms, including those related to urinary frequency and daily activity limitation.


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Curcumin reduces urinary side effects of radiation therapy in prostate cancer patients

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Going Feral: my one-year journey to acquire the healthiest gut microbiome in the world (you heard me!) - Human Food Project

Going Feral: my one-year journey to acquire the healthiest gut microbiome in the world (you heard me!) - Human Food Project | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Unless you’ve been holed up in a cabin in the Siberian outback, it’s been hard to miss the avalanche of research and associated press coverage ballyhooing the connection between microbes and human health and disease in 2013 – and 2014 will be no different, as fecal transplants become the new black!

 

Name just about any ailment plaguing humanity and you will find some researcher, somewhere, working the microbial angle for a causal or correlative connection. More federal funding please!

 

But reading between the lines of the near breathless and optimistic reporting on the human microbiome, sits a sobering fact: scientists know very little about the connection between disease and the potential microbial culprits (these are early days). Science is hard and the human gut is a vast and diverse ecosystem. As with any ecosystem, it’s the community as a whole that’s likely more important, not single members per se. Connecting the dots when there are lots of them – and they are shape shifting all the time – is proving to be tough (a similar reality has slowed our understanding of the role of human genes in disease). This will take some time – but the writing is on the wall.


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Going Feral: my one-year journey to acquire the healthiest gut microbiome in the world (you heard me!) - Human Food Project

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Curcumin was founTurmeric d 100% effective at preventing Type 2 Diabeteextract s

Curcumin was founTurmeric d 100% effective at preventing Type 2 Diabeteextract s | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

A remarkable human clinical study published in the journal Diabetes Care, the journal of the American Diabetes Association, revealed that turmeric extract was 100% successful at preventing prediabetic patients from becoming diabetic over the course of a 9-month intervention.

 

Performed by Thailand researchers, the study's primary object was to assess the efficacy of curcumin, the primary polyphenol in turmeric which gives the spice its golden hue, in delaying the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a prediabetic population...


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Curcumin was founTurmeric d 100% effective at preventing Type 2 Diabeteextract s

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Arun Shrivastava's curator insight, November 23, 2013 10:10 AM

Quod Erat Demonstarndum

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Vitamin D supplements reduce pain in fibromyalgia sufferers

Vitamin D supplements reduce pain in fibromyalgia sufferers | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

In a randomized controlled trial, 30 women with FMS with low serum calcifediol levels (below 32ng/ml) were randomized to a treatment or control group. The goal for the treatment group was to achieve serum calcifediol levels between 32 and 48ng/ml for 20 weeks via oral cholecalciferol supplements. Serum calcifediol levels were reevaluated after five and 13 weeks, and the dose was reviewed based on the results. The calcifediol levels were measured again 25 weeks after the start of the supplementation, at which time treatment was discontinued, and after a further 24 weeks without supplementation.

 

Twenty-four weeks after supplementation was stopped, a marked reduction in the level of perceived pain occurred in the treatment group. Between the first and the 25th week on supplementation, the treatment group improved significantly on a scale of physical role functioning, while the placebo group remained unchanged. The treatment group also scored significantly better on a Fibromalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) on the question of "morning fatigue." However, there were no significant alterations in depression or anxiety symptoms.

 

"We believe that the data presented in the present study are promising. FMS is a very extensive symptom complex that cannot be explained by a vitamin D deficiency alone. However, vitamin D supplementation may be regarded as a relatively safe and economical treatment for FMS patients and an extremely cost-effective alternative or adjunct to expensive pharmacological treatment as well as physical, behavioral, and multimodal therapies," says Wepner. "Vitamin D levels should be monitored regularly in FMS patients, especially in the winter season, and raised appropriately."

 

 

 


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Low vitamin D levels a risk factor for pneumonia

A University of Eastern Finland study showed that low serum vitamin D levels are a risk factor for pneumonia. The risk of contracting pneumonia was more than 2.5 times greater in subjects with the lowest vitamin D levels than in subjects with high vitamin D levels. The results were published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

 

The follow-up study carried out by the UEF Institute of Public Health investigated the link between serum vitamin D3 and the risk of contracting pneumonia. The study involved 1,421 subjects living in the Kuopio region in Eastern Finland. The serum vitamin D3 levels of the subjects were measured from blood samples drawn in 1998–2001, and these data were compared against reported cases of pneumonia in hospital records in the same set of subjects in 1998–2009. The results showed that during the follow-up, subjects with serum vitamin D3 levels representing the lowest third were more than 2.5 times more likely to contract pneumonia than subjects with high vitamin D3 levels. Furthermore, smoking constituted a significant risk factor for pneumonia. The risk of contracting pneumonia also grew by age, and was greater in men than women. At baseline, the mean serum D3 concentration of the study population was 43.5 nmol/l, and the mean age of the study population was 62.5 years.


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“Healthy aging diets other than the Mediterranean: A Focus on the Okinawan Diet”

“Healthy aging diets other than the Mediterranean: A Focus on the Okinawan Diet” | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

The traditional diet in Okinawa is anchored by root vegetables (principally sweet potatoes), green and yellow vegetables, soybean-based foods, and medicinal plants. Marine foods, lean meats, fruit, medicinal garnishes and spices, tea, alcohol are also moderately consumed. Many characteristics of the traditional Okinawan diet are shared with other healthy dietary patterns, including the traditional Mediterranean diet, DASH diet, and Portfolio diet. All these dietary patterns are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, among other age-associated diseases. Overall, the important shared features of these healthy dietary patterns include: high intake of unrefined carbohydrates, moderate protein intake with emphasis on vegetables/legumes, fish, and lean meats as sources, and a healthy fat profile (higher in mono/polyunsaturated fats, lower in saturated fat; rich in omega-3). The healthy fat intake is likely one mechanism for reducing inflammation, optimizing cholesterol, and other risk factors. Additionally, the lower caloric density of plant-rich diets results in lower caloric intake with concomitant high intake of phytonutrients and antioxidants. Other shared features include low glycemic load, less inflammation and oxidative stress, and potential modulation of aging-related biological pathways. This may reduce risk for chronic age-associated diseases and promote healthy aging and longevity.


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“Healthy aging diets other than the Mediterranean: A Focus on the Okinawan Diet”

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Obésité et diabète, le e-coaching nutritionnel à l’étude

Obésité et diabète, le e-coaching nutritionnel à l’étude | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Une grande étude va évaluer le coaching nutritionnel sur internet. Les personnes en surpoids et diabétiques peuvent participer.

Via Rémy TESTON
Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's insight:

Obésité et diabète, le e-coaching nutritionnel à l’étude

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Sophie Undreiner's curator insight, January 11, 2014 4:03 AM

utilisation de l'internet pour la vie quotidienne et la santé...