chinglish
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Mike Sui at the bar (w/ English Subtitles)

Mike Sui an American in China, got bored and tried to emulate personality from 12 different countries, including as a chinese. As a result, a very funny vide...
Irene Chen Shen's insight:

This guy speaks really good Chinglish...

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Rescooped by Irene Chen Shen from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Chinese town wants Internet's help fixing 'Chinglish' signs

Chinese town wants Internet's help fixing 'Chinglish' signs | chinglish | Scoop.it
Is crowdsourcing the solution to embarrassing translations?

Via Thomas Faltin
Irene Chen Shen's insight:

A lot of the translations came from google translator according to some netizens... Maybe google doesn't know Chinese that well...

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Rescooped by Irene Chen Shen from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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Lost in translation: Chinese city seeks help to end ‘Chinglish’

Lost in translation: Chinese city seeks help to end ‘Chinglish’ | chinglish | Scoop.it

For years, English-speaking tourists in China have giggled over mistranslated signs. For example, “Beware of slipping” on a 'Chinglish' sign is “Carefully slipping”. And many translations just make no sense whatsoever. (See below...) But authorities in the city of Shenzhen are looking for help from the public to wipe out 'Chinglish'. Error-spotters can submit their findings through popular microblogging site Weibo, by email, or even by calling a hotline. These submissions will then be examined by a team of professional translators and participants can even win prizes. However, the prize for error-spotters is rather incongruous: English language classes.  


Via Charles Tiayon
Irene Chen Shen's insight:

The prize is badly designed really...

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, October 14, 2013 3:07 AM
For years, English-speaking tourists in China have giggled over mistranslated signs. For example, “Beware of slipping” on a 'Chinglish' sign is “Carefully slipping”. And many translations just make no sense whatsoever. (See below...) But authorities in the city of Shenzhen are looking for help from the public to wipe out 'Chinglish'. Error-spotters can submit their findings through popular microblogging site Weibo, by email, or even by calling a hotline. These submissions will then be examined by a team of professional translators and participants can even win prizes. However, the prize for error-spotters is rather incongruous: English language classes.