Chinese Cinderella
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Tianjin

Tianjin | Chinese Cinderella | Scoop.it
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This is the city where Adeline spent many years of her childhood. If you were to visit it today it would be a beautiful Chinese city. There would be much to see and do, such as visit the port. You could experience a lot of Chinese culture in the city. 

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X-Rays of bound feet

X-Rays of bound feet | Chinese Cinderella | Scoop.it
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This picture relates to the book because Adeline's grandmother had bound feet. My reaction to this is shock and disgust, because it obviously looks incredibly painful, and it's hard to imagine anyone wanting to do this to themselves. 

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"Footbinding." World History in Context. N.p., 2005. Web. 22 May 2014.

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This article is all about the ancient tradition form China of Foot binding. Foot binding is the extreme and painful process of wrapping woman's feet with tight cloths to bend back their toes to their heels. It is a tradition that has gone on for centuries before it was banned. Foot binding was excruciatingly painful. It even would cause death on occasion. TO go with their tiny feet, the women would then have to show off their embroidery skills as they made themselves tiny silk shoes to make the small feet even smaller.

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Eng, Robert. "Foot Binding." Encyclopedia of Modern Asia. N.p.: n.p., 2002. N pag. World History in Context. Web. 22 May 2014.

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Hailey Hawkins's insight:

This article is about the process of foot binding, and why it was done. The practice started in the late 10th century as the emperor was obsessed with tiny feet. Because of this women all over China when through brutal and painful measures to obtain perfect tiny feet. They would bind their toes and heels together with tight bandages until all the bones in their feet broke, and their feet were about 8 centimeters long. This process would cripple them for the rest of their lives as they had to hobble around painfully on tiny feet. The smaller and more "perfect" their tiny feet were, the higher their status was.

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China's Lost Girls - YouTube

Lisa Ling recalls the overpowering emotion when American couples in China meet their adopted daughters for the first time. Explorer: 25 Years airs Monday, Ap...
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This is a documentary that explores China's One-Child Policy and the effect it has had on China, especially the effect it has had on the girls in the country. Often now in China when girls are born, they are either killed, or left in parks or on the sides of roads for orphanages to take care of. This documentary follows the process as American families travel to China, to adopt little Chinese girls. It was extremely emotional for all the families, especially since these baby girls were all unwanted simply because of the countries preference of boys over girls. Lisa Ling explored many of the consequences over this favoritism. Because of the large imbalance, in the schools they visited, they were almost completely full with just boys. Another consequence is now as all these boys grow up, the men cannot all find a wife because there simply is not enough for them all, so many women are being stolen from their husbands, taken and forced to be another mans wife.

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Propaganda for the One-Child Policy in China

Propaganda for the One-Child Policy in China | Chinese Cinderella | Scoop.it
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This propaganda is shown in China to show the citizens this happy prosperous family with just one child. The problem is that this poster is favoring the tradition of sons over daughters because the child in this poster is a boy.  

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Chinese Cinderella

By Adeline Yen Mah

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Chinese Cinderella, is a autobiography written by Adeline Yen Mah, about her depressing childhood in China, growing up unwanted and unloved by her family.Adeline's mother had died giving birth to her, and she was the youngest of five. But then her father remarried a horrible  woman and Adeline and her siblings gained a stepmother and then two younger half-siblings. Her two half-siblings were spoiled beyond belief as the other five were barely cared for. As the youngest and most stubborn to be loyal, Adeline never tried to kiss up to her stepmother and was treated even worse than her other siblings. She was beaten and yelled at, by both her stepmother and her father. Her siblings teased, tortured, beat and abused her. When they needed someone to blame or pick on she was always their target. Adeline only had two solaces in her life to find comfort in: her Aunt Baba, and school. Adeline and her Aunt Baba shared a close bond since Adeline was a baby as they shared a room until Adeline was around eight. Her aunt was the only one who cared for and cared about Adeline, no one else in their full house would even notice if she went missing. Adeline growing up also found refuge in her studies and school. She worked very hard on her studies. Each week she would win awards for being top of the class, ever since her first week of Kindergarten. She only wished to please her father with her studies and wanted to be loved. Her siblings, jealous of her progress in school, only sought to hurt her more because of it. At school though Adeline found friends and was well liked by her peers. But her stepmother forbid her to go over to friends house or to ever have friends come over. Eventually they became so sick of her they sent her away to boarding school in Hong Kong. Then seeming as they had forgotten her for years at age 14 she won a writing competition and was published in the newspaper which finally got her fathers attention and approval. He allowed her to go to college in England to study and become a doctor. As this is how they story then ends, later in an Author's Note we learn that once her father had died her stepmother hid his will from her and then later disowned her. Chinese Cinderella is a true story of an unwanted daughter.

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Girls Orphanage in China

Girls Orphanage in China | Chinese Cinderella | Scoop.it
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There are many orphanages for girls throughout China. Many families only want their only child to be male, so if they have a daughter, they often leave them for orphanages. 

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Bound Feet

Bound Feet | Chinese Cinderella | Scoop.it
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These feet look horrid and painful. It is hard to believe that feet like this were treasured and thought of as beautiful in their culture. Walking on feet like this must be near impossible. 

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Chinese New Year History

The History of the Chinese New Year was said to start from the year end religious ceremony in Shang Dynasty. A few said that it started from as early as Emperor Yao and Shun.
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      This website goes into detail all about Chinese new year. It describes the history, traditions, culture, food, crafts, calendars, greeting and activities involved in Chinese New Year. In China each year is symbolized with one of twelve animals, the twelve animals rotate every twelve years. The animal of the year you are borne in is your Chinese symbol in China. The twelve animals are horse, sheep, rooster, monkey, dog, pig, rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon and snake. Chinese New Year symbolized new beginnings. Around the new year, Chinese tradition include cleaning the house, making new foods, getting new clothes, and new haircuts to symbolize new change

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Baculinao, Eric. "China's Children." World History in Context. N.p., 2007. Web 15 May 2014.

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Hailey Hawkins's insight:

"China's Children" is about the imbalance of boys and girls in China, and the One-Child Policy that was enacted by the Chinese Government in attempts to contain the population size. The article tells about how the population is so imbalanced between girls and boys and what this implies. In 2004, the ratio of boys to girls was 20:1. This preference of boys over girls goes back centuries. There are many reasons Chinese families have preferred boys over girls. Male offspring can carry out the family name, and work for their families and carry on their fathers business. In the past, males were more privileged than women, as only men were allowed to participate in religious and family rituals. Daughters were considered nothing more than just property of their fathers, until they were then married off to husbands for money in their late teens. Then they were their husbands property and had to take care of their in-laws and bear sons. In the 1980's in their attempt to contain their growing population China enacted the One-Child Policy were families can only have one child. This then lead to many daughters killed during pregnancy, after birth, or then left on the streets to die or to be taken by an orphanage.

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