Chinese American history
16.1K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by John Jung
onto Chinese American history
Scoop.it!

New book unearths Canada's role in recruiting labourers from China for a secret role in World War I in Europe

New book unearths Canada's role in recruiting labourers from China for a secret role in World War I in Europe | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Forget Apple or Foxconn: the most secretive mass western outsourcing of jobs to China took place almost a century ago.
John Jung's insight:

In a just-published book titled Quarantined: Life and Death at William Head Station 1872-1959 (Heritage House), Peter Johnson describes Canada's key role in recruiting over 82,000 Chinese from Shandong province starting in 1917 to perform a range of battlefield services in Europe during WW I, including digging trenches, driving trucks, delivering and preparing food, medicines, and ammunition, and recovering bodies and unexploded shells. Although not trained to engage in combat, their manpower was badly needed to support the Allied troops against the Germans.

 

Their amazing story of the Chinese Labour Corps and their passage through Canada have been so well buried that they remain little known beyond academic circles. The Chinese Canadian Military Museum Society, which has pictures of some CLC members in its exhibit in the Chinese Cultural Centre complex in Vancouver’s Chinatown, is expanding its research on the labourers.

more...
No comment yet.
Chinese American history
Websites related to the history of Chinese in North America
Curated by John Jung
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chow Chop Suey - Food and the Chinese American Journey | Columbia University Press

Chow Chop Suey - Food and the Chinese American Journey | Columbia University Press | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Anne Mendelson. Chinese food first became popular in America under the shadow of violence against Chinese aliens, a despised racial minority ineligible for United States citizenship. The founding of late-nineteenth-c
John Jung's insight:
A unique and thorough examination of the origins and development of Chinese restaurant food in the U. S. (and Canada, for that matter)by food historian Anne Mendelsohn.. She starts with a detailed history of Chinese immigrants in the U. S. starting from the mid 19th century to provide a context for understanding the significance of Chinese restaurant food and how it is prepared, using "chop suey" as the foundation and emphasizing the cooking method (chow, which came to be awkwardly translated as stir-fry) rather than the dish, chop suey, which in reality is not a specific dish with a set of fixed ingredients as providers of recipes imply.
Contrary to the rise of popularity of Chinese-Americanized food over the past century, it is important to note that it was derided and rejected initially because of its unfamiliar ingredients, cooking method, and unpleasant smell, at least to westerners. With the rapidly growing Chinese, and other Asian populations in many cities, newer Chinese restaurateurs are no longer finding it necessary to tailor their cooking to suit nonAsian tastes as in the past. Cuisines from many regions of China have arrived to compete with the original Cantonese dishes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese American Eyes

Chinese American Eyes | Chinese American history | Scoop.it

Famous, forgotten, well-known, and obscure visual artists of Chinese descent in the United States     (above graphic about the Boxer rebellion was done in 1900 for the Chinese Weekly Herald newspaper by Sun Yow Pang)

John Jung's insight:
An informative and unique encyclopedic database of "famous, forgotten, well-known, and obscure visual artists of Chinese descent in the US compiled diligently by Alex Jay.  He includes many original biographical documents such as immigration and census records as well as graphics of the artist.

Right hand column lists chronologically from 1861, followed by artist names in alphabetical order.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Why Chinese People Came To The United States | AJ+

There are now more than 4 million Chinese people living in the United States. Surprisingly, most of these immigrants came in the last few decades, startin
John Jung's insight:
A brief overview of the history of Chinese immigration in the U. S. that explains the different patterns and motivations for Chinese to leave China at different times. 
Part of a series produced and narrated by Dolli Li. for AJ+, the online documentary series for Al Jazeera Media Network.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Of Race and Reconciliation: Tacoma and the Chinese

KBTC presents and hour long program called, Of Race and Reconciliation. It chronicles the Chinese experience in America around the year 1885. That was th
John Jung's insight:
In the last quarter of the 19th century, Chinese immigrant laborers were subjected to extreme racism and violence in many parts of the American west, and one of the most egregious places was in Tacoma, Washington.  In 1885, a few years after the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Law in 1882, the citizens of Tacoma gave the Chinese a month to leave the town. One night a mob forced all remaining Chinese to leave Tacoma by  train to Portland. The areas where the Chinese had lived were burned to the ground.  This approach served as a model for other cities to follow, and it was referred to as the  "Tacoma Method."

Several cities that had expelled Chinese during this period have created events and monuments to promote 'reconciliation' between these communities and the Chinese.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

New York Chinatown's Historic Public School 23

In 1984 the New York Chinatown History Project took up residence in four rooms of 70 Mulberry Street. The museum was on the second floor; its gallery space designed by the NYC architects Billie Tsien and Tod Williams. 70 Mulberry Street was formerly Public School 23. The Norman Romanesque Revival building was constructed in 1892, and was one of the first school buildings designed by C.B.J. Snyder, a noted architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the New York City Board of Education from 1891 to 1923. Schools designed by Snyder in other parts of the city have been landmarked (see the Census listing for P.S. 64/ El Bohio). Until it closed in 1976, many of Chinatown's children attended school at P.S. 23. The New York Chinatown History Project, which was subsequently named the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA), hosted an exhibit called What Did You Learn In School Today? P.S. 23, 1893-1976.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Untold Story Of America's Southern Chinese [Chinese Food: An All-American Cuisine, Pt. 2] | AJ+

There's a rather unknown community of Chinese-Americans who've lived in the Mississippi Delta for more than a hundred years. They played an important rol
John Jung's insight:
A look back at the legacy of a unique Chinese American community that once flourished despite long odds in the Jim Crow Mississippi Delta operating family-run grocery stores.  Several Chinese who grew up in these conditions and still live there provide rich details by sharing their memories.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Home

Home | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Chinese students at M.I.T., 1877-1931
John Jung's insight:
A comprehensive compilation of biographical and academic backgrounds and achievements of pioneering students at MIT from China in the late 19th century by MIT Professor Emma Teng. 

Each photograph on the home screen is actually a menu item, which when clicked will provide much information about the lives and experiences of these remarkable young men.

Some of the students were  government sponsored with specific educational goals in mind. Under the "Self-strengthening" movement of the late 19th century, Chinese reformers promoted the acquisition of Western scientific, military and technical knowledge as the key to saving China from imperialist aggression.

Other students were mostly sons of merchants, bankers and compradores who recognized the practical value of Western scientific and engineering education. Families from this social stratum, many of them Christians, could be considered the "early adopters" of Western Learning (西學).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

How The White Establishment Waged A ‘War’ On Chinese Restaurants In The U.S. in Early 20th century

How The White Establishment Waged A ‘War’ On Chinese Restaurants In The U.S. in Early 20th century | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Though Chinese restaurants are now an American staple, during the late 1800s and early 1900s, some Americans staged a multipronged effort to shut them down.
John Jung's insight:
As Chinese restaurants expanded rapidly in the early 20th century, they were seen as threats to white America restaurants and their workers.  Laws directed against Chinese immigration and tighter regulation of Chinese restaurants were challenges for the Chinese. Fears of Chinese and white sexual contact led tin some places o laws prohibiting white women working in Chinese restaurants.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Angel Island: America’s Other Immigrant Isle

Angel Island: America’s  Other Immigrant Isle | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
On Angel Island, exclusion, not admission, was the name of the immigration game
John Jung's insight:
Most Chinese who immigrated to the U. S. from 1910-1940 were processed at the Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco bay. Historian Judy Yung describes its history and the experiences of the Chinese, many who were detained for long periods and subjected to intense scrutiny of their identities and documents, in marked contrast to the easier entry procedures for most Anglo immigrants at Ellis Island in New York harbor.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chop Suey on San Francisco Street : How George Park beat anti-Chinese laws and started a prominent Santa Fe family

Chop Suey on San Francisco Street : How George Park beat anti-Chinese laws and started a prominent Santa Fe family | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The woman watched as soldiers confiscated her family’s land and beat her husband to death—another horror in the bloody land reforms of Chairman Mao Zedong’s Communist Party.
John Jung's insight:
There were few Chinese in Sante Fe, New Mexico, during the Chinese Exclusion era, but George Park and his family had a restaurant there from the mid 1920s until 1975, originally named the Majestic but renamed in 1937 as the New Canton. This fascinating article describes in detail the immigration story of the family and how they became accepted in the Sante Fe community.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese Exclusion Act, 1882-1943 

Chinese Exclusion Act, 1882-1943  | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Winston Ho's compilation of  Youtube videos related to the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act.
John Jung's insight:
A compilation by historian Winston Ho of over 20 videos from various sources dealing with aspects of the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882-1943) that had profound and long lasting negative consequences for Chinese in America.  (A similar law existed in Canada)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

America's first Chinatown captured in 19th century photos

America's first Chinatown captured in 19th century photos | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Chinatown in San Francisco was established in 1848, but was destroyed by an earthquake and a series of fires in 1906. It was later re-built and continues to thrive today.
John Jung's insight:
Some photographs of everyday life in early Chinatown in San Francisco before and after the 1906 earthquake and fire.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

World War 2 Flying Ace Arthur Chin's Amazing True Story

World War 2 Flying Ace Arthur Chin's Amazing True Story | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
This is the amazing true story of World War 2 veteran Arthur Tien Chin and his amazing exploits as a flying ace and fighter pilot.
John Jung's insight:
Americans of Chinese descent, in defense of China, served in the air war over China during the ’30s. Art Chin, born in Portland, was one of these American born Chinese who volunteered to join as a fighter pilot, and was truly a hero.

At first, China did not welcome ABCs as pilots..Told that their pay would be  only about $25 and they would have to buy their own uniforms, he and a friend turned around and started walking out. They were then asked, ‘What do you want to do? Go back to America to be laundrymen?’ That was the clincher and  they decided to join the battle!

"Some became aces before the U.S. even entered the war. Many stayed on and continued to contribute to the Allied effort, joined by more of their countrymen. One of these was Arthur “Art” Chin, whose courage and dogged tenacity in the face of adversity shines as an example to us all."

 His story is a shared piece of Chinese and United States aviation and military history, and his legacy should be shared as well."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Blue, the Gray and the Chinese

The Blue, the Gray and the Chinese | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
American Civil War Participants of Chinese Descent
John Jung's insight:
Fascinating stories of Chinese in the US who fought, on both sides, in the American Civil War. The National Park Service published a book, Asians and Pacific Islanders and the Civl War, in 2015, which is featured, but the blogger, Alex Jay, includes detailed accounts of the experiences of other Chinese men who fought in the war.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Rediscovered: An Eloquent Chinese Voice Against Exclusion | Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center NOW

Rediscovered: An Eloquent Chinese Voice Against Exclusion | Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center NOW | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Chinese-American voices were rarely heard during the national debate over Chinese exclusion that swept the United States in the 1870s and early 1880s. It w
John Jung's insight:
Wong Ar Chong, a 33 year old Boston merchant was an "unsung hero" who articulated an eloquent set of arguments agains the exclusion of Chinese immigrants sent to a sympathetic abolitionist, William Lloyd Garrison..  His pleas did not succeed, and in 1882, led to Senator James G. Blaine, (Maine, R) the Chinese ExclusionAct was passed.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

British Chinese Heritage Project

Empty description
John Jung's insight:
NOT about Chinese in the U. S. but this oral history project in Birmingham, England about the British Chinese community bears strong similarity to the issues that Chinese faced in the U.S. and other countries over the past 150+ years.oral history project in Birmingham, England about the British Chinese community bears strong similarity to the issues that Chinese faced in the U.S. and other countries over the past 150+ years.

There is an excellent video on this page,.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Flying Tigers: The Story Of The 14th Air Force – Video Made In 1945

This is a 1945 historical film called Flying Tigers: The Story Of The 14th Air Force. It is the amazing story of a group of americans in a strange land.
John Jung's insight:
 detailed 1945 footage of the background and significant contribution of the fabled "Flying Tigers" (a volunteer force of American pilots) toward defeating the Japanese in control of the Burma Road, which was critical for China's survival in WW II.  Gripping footage of aerial combat and suffering of refugees.
"The most interesting part of this video to us is the work that went in to getting the planes, bombs, fuel, and other stuff to China by land. It was multiple rail roads, ox carts, guys carrying stuff with sticks, amazing. The video is long but it is one that had us hanging on every word."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

How Chop Suey Saved San Francisco's Chinatown [Chinese Food: An All-American Cuisine, Pt. 1] | AJ+

Chinese-Americans have a long history of facing exclusion in the U.S. As a means of survival, many first-wave Chinese immigrants opened restaurants an
John Jung's insight:
First of a series on Chinese American history that connects Chinese food and Chinese communities.  This episode centers on San Francisco, and the role of chop suey in the development of Chinatown as a tourist mecca for food.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Gong Lum v. Rice: The Forgotten Case for Equal Education in the Jim Crow South

Gong Lum v. Rice: The Forgotten Case for Equal Education in the Jim Crow South | Chinese American history | Scoop.it

An impressive research compilation by Cameron Tichy (apparently a high school student) created in 2016 about the landmark 1927 U. S. Supreme Court case, Gong Lum v. Rice, that upheld the Mississippi decision that ruled Chinese children could not attend white schools.

John Jung's insight:
An impressive website created in 2016 that is an accurate and comprehensive presentation of the landmark 1927 U.S. Supreme Court case, Gong Lum v. Rice, that upheld school segregation of Chinese school children, denying Martha and Bertha Lum admission to the white school in Rosedale, MS. in 1923.( It appears to be the creation of a high school student who was a Chinese immigrant, Cameron Tichy.)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese Laborers Built Sonoma’s Wineries. Racist Neighbors Drove Them Out

Chinese Laborers Built Sonoma’s Wineries. Racist Neighbors Drove Them Out | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Enjoying a chardonnay or cabernet sauvignon? In the 1800s, Chinese immigrants helped introduce those iconic varietals to California's wine country. But as
John Jung's insight:
Ho Po, a Chinese labor contractor from San Francisco, sent 150 of his countrymen to build Buena Vista, Sonoma’s oldest commercial winery.  Workers literally dug the t 15-by-30-foot caves of the winery out of rock by hand,”  They did backbreaking, physical labor, as well as horticultural work that required significant knowledge and skill.  Between 1856 and 1869, Chinese planted the majority of Sonoma County’s 3.2 million grapevines replacing old grapes with with Riesling, Muscatel, Traminer, Black Hamburg, Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and other fine European varietals.

However, as the vineyards grew, backlash against the Chinese increased as anti-Chinese leagues were formed in many counties, with whites accusing Chinese of undercutting wages.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Immigrant Voices: Discover Immigrant Stories from Angel Island

Immigrant Voices: Discover Immigrant Stories from Angel Island | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Discover the stories of Pacific Coast Immigrants from around the world.
John Jung's insight:
All Chinese immigrants entering the U. S. through San Francisco between 1910 and 1940 had to be detained and interrogated intensely at the Angel Island Immigration Station. The stories of the experiences of some of these immigrants are now archived and give readers a vivid understanding of the gauntlet that they have to face.  Many did not succeed and were denied admission.
Details of the ordeal faced by Louie Quan Bang who was not allowed to reenter the U. S. after he left California to visit China illustrate the tortuous and intricate maze of immigration.  https://www.aiisf.org/immigrant-voices/stories-by-author/1042-student-louie-quan-bang-barred-from-returning-to-the-us/

Note: The story of Louie Quan' Bang's fate is a third person account, but most of the stories are first-person accounts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

History of Chinese in Prescott, AZ

History of Chinese in Prescott, AZ | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Chinese began to settle in Prescott, AZ. in the 1860s even though they were hardly welcome and faced racism..
John Jung's insight:
Chinese began to settle  in Prescott, AZ. in the 1860s even though they were hardly welcome and faced racism..   Some of them may have been laid-off laborers from the Transcontinental Railroad  in 1869.  They worked as produce farmers, miners, cooks in saloons and restaurants, domestic servants, laundry owners, and even a faro dealer.
Various factors contributed to the departure of the Chinese from Prescott. In 1886 Stephen B. Marcou started a campaign against the Chinese and established an Anti-Chinese League. In 1891 Granite Creek overran its banks and flooded Chinatown. The great fire on July 14, 1900, destroyed Whiskey Row and the red light district with their restaurants, hotels, saloons, stores, sporting parlors and other businesses which were owned by or which employed Chinese. Further erosion of employment opportunities occurred in 1907 when gambling was declared illegal in Arizona Territory. In 1900 the Chinese population peaked at 229.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

New York Chinatown's Historic Public School 23

In 1984 the New York Chinatown History Project took up residence in four rooms of 70 Mulberry Street. The museum was on the second floor; its gallery space designed by the NYC architects Billie Tsien and Tod Williams. 70 Mulberry Street was formerly Public School 23. The Norman Romanesque Revival building was constructed in 1892, and was one of the first school buildings designed by C.B.J. Snyder, a noted architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the New York City Board of Education from 1891 to 1923. Schools designed by Snyder in other parts of the city have been landmarked (see the Census listing for P.S. 64/ El Bohio). Until it closed in 1976, many of Chinatown's children attended school at P.S. 23. The New York Chinatown History Project, which was subsequently named the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA), hosted an exhibit called What Did You Learn In School Today? P.S. 23, 1893-1976.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chin Gee Hee, Labor Contractor and Engineer

Chin Gee Hee, Labor Contractor and Engineer | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Chin Gee Hee  was a Chinese merchant, labor contractor, and railway entrepreneur, who made his fortune in Seattle, Washington before returning to his native village in Guangdong province, where he continued his successes including the building of the first railway in Guangdong..
John Jung's insight:
Labor contractors, such as Chin Gee Hee in the Pacific Northwest,  played a key role in bringing Chinese laborers from China that is not fully recognized in accounts of the Chinese diaspora.
.
"Chin Gee Hee (June 22, 1844 – 1929), courtesy name Chàngtíng (暢庭), Cheun Gee Yee, was a Chinese merchant, labor contractor, and railway entrepreneur, who made his fortune in Seattle, Washington before returning to his native village in Guangdong province, where he continued his successes." He built the Sun Ning Railway, the first in Guangdong, with funds raised mostly from overseas Chinese.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Struggles of a Local Chinese Artist in the Era of Exclusion - Free Press Online

The Struggles of a Local Chinese Artist in the Era of Exclusion - Free Press Online | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
When I. Nee Lee emigrated from Hong Kong to the U.S. in 1902, it was not an easy time to be Chinese in America. It was the year that Congress made permanent the
John Jung's insight:
I. Nee Lee  immigrated to the U.S.in 1902 at the age of 14 and eventually found his way to Camden, Maine in 1917 where he was one of the few Chinese during an era of anti-Chinese prejudice.. He operated a laundry, but found time to paint beautiful landscapes of the region with a Chinese perspective.

"There are no known written accounts by Lee in existence, but his paintings, which he gave to his landlady in lieu of rent, allow a glimpse into the man. Lee's artwork primarily focuses on the the scenic landscapes, mountains and lakes of Camden. He liked to paint colorful pictures of farmers and fishermen on the lake or in Camden Harbor with seemingly little concern for accurate proportions."
more...
No comment yet.