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Tracking Military, Geopolitical & Strategic trends to determine China's impact Regionally Globally and Domestically
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State Department Peddles China's BS On Tibet

State Department Peddles China's BS On Tibet | China Commentary | Scoop.it
https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pYghfAOH1Pg Here's an educational video on why exactly Tibetans should not consider the State Department any true friend, and certainly n...

Via Chris Grech
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The Art of (China’s) Colonialism: Constructing Invisibilities in (Tibetan) History and Geography

The Art of (China’s) Colonialism: Constructing Invisibilities in (Tibetan) History and Geography | China Commentary | Scoop.it
© 2012

(FOR READERS: I’ve defined the following terminologies to smooth out the read:

Assumption: Representation.

Invisibility: Erasure: Silences.

Formation: as how things are formed

Discourse: narrative: discursive: polemics: writings: texts: as the mediums in which the conqueror, narrates the story of their conquest and the people they conquered, in the way they like to imagine themselves, to themselves.

Colonizer: Oppressor: Conqueror: Aggressor:  as the governance or group that is exerting power on another group.

The Orient: Colonized: Oppressed: Conquered:  as the group that the governance or more powerful group is exerting power on.)

 

What does an ethnographic discourse on the invisibility of a colonial empire in the 21st century look like? What does that invisibility contribute to, or rather take away from, the experiences of Tibetans inside and outside Tibet? In this post, I examine the historical and contemporary discourses on Tibet that frame Tibet as either not colonized or about human rights, which, I argue, silences Tibetan aspirations for Nationhood. Aside from contextualizing Tibetan subjectivities, I contribute to the ongoing discourse on how ethnographic narratives can re-construct the invisibility of existing colonial empires and justify their presence as a givenright rather then foreign.

 

Qing and Nationalist Empire:

When talking about the historical and political relationship between Tibet and China, most scholars on both pro and anti China sides of the spectrum point to the Qing dynasty (from 1905 to 1911) to historically frame the beginning of the political conflict between Lhasa and Qing administrations (Shakya 1999:xxii). According to historian Tsomu, Qing administration’s desire to control Lhasa’s administration, and, therefore, Tibet, was prompted by the impending threat of Western imperialism (2012:3). The Qing administration became increasingly insecure as its neighboring countries and kingdoms became colonies under various European empires. The threat of Western powers penetrating its own territories, according to Ho, prompted the Qing administration’s interest in incorporating Tibet and securing its frontiers (Ho 2008:210-46). This insecurity was furthered by the British invasion in 1904 (Tsomu 2012:3) and the rise of Nyarong Gonpo Namgyal’s power in Kham (19) (see Woeser for more on Nyarong Gonpo). According to Tsomu, in order to take “effective control over Lhasa” the Qing needed to first secure its dominance over the border province, Kham (4). Here we find the motive for why the Qing wanted to take control of Kham, and, therefore, Lhasa: insecurities about Western imperialism.

 

Although the Khampas opposed the Lhasa administration’s authority, they united under the 13th Dalai Lama’s call to “defend Buddhism” against the Qing in 1912 (5). However, the Nationalist (also called Kuomintang) revolution that broke out across the Qing Empire ended their threat in Kham and, therefore, Lhasa, resulting in the 13th Dalai Lama’s declaration of Tibet as an Independent nation (5). The threat of Han-domination, however, did not end with the Qing. After the Nationalist party came to power (from 1912 to 1949) following the fall of the Qing, they took up where the Qing had left off with Kham. Along with military attempts to take control of Kham, the Nationalists implemented a textual strategy to incorporate Kham “into China’s national imagination and understood as a core territory of the new China” (5). According to Tsomu, “[d]uring this period, there was a new effort to translate works [on Tibet] by Western authors” and produce their own works to 1) write Kham and, therefore, Tibet into China’s national history and 2) support claims of western imperial interest in Tibet, while simultaneously justifying their presence in Tibet (6). Here we find how the Nationalists planned to make Tibet part of China’s national and historical imagination: (re)production of ethnographic discourse on Tibet.

DOSID's insight:

The "Great Game" ..Tibet in the cross hairs. Excellent post by Lhakar Diaries. 


What is Lhakar ...Quote " 

WHAT IS LHAKAR?

We have created Lhakar Diaries to honor the Lhakar Movement and stand in solidarity with Tibetans inside who are fighting for the survival of the Tibetan nation and identity. This is a space for us Tibetans to come together to talk about what we think it means to be Tibetan in the diaspora context, for young Tibetans to explore our own thoughts, ideas and questions about our identities as Tibetans. We encourage young Tibetans to join us to post stories, thoughts, art, music, and videos of any sort that you think feel contributes to exploration and empowerment of the Tibetan identity."

 

Source:http://lhakardiaries.com/about/

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龙信明 A Brief Commentary on Tibet

龙信明  A Brief Commentary on Tibet | China Commentary | Scoop.it
Tibet,Tibet history,CIA in Tibet,US interference,CIA-financed separatism,torture in Tibet

 

A Brief Commentary on Tibet

The Westerners who are the Most Vocal About Tibet
Also Appear to be the Most Unforgivably Uninformed


Strong opinions about Tibet are often held in the West, mostly by those who haven't been there and whose knowledge appears gleaned from misguided propaganda in the popular press.

The first adjective that would come to mind about Tibet is 'desolate'. Those who have been in the the far North (beyond the Arctic Circle), or above the tree line in the North American Rocky Mountains or the European Alps, will have some idea of the Tibetan landscape - which is 10,000 feet above the tree line.

There is nothing hospitable about the isolated conditions or climate in Tibet. Surely there are people who can see beauty in even the most desolate surroundings, but these brave detached souls would be most unlikely to choose that location for a summer home and certainly wouldn't live there by choice.

DOSID's insight:

A very dispassionate and realistic account of an othervise emotive issue. There a lot of harsh facts about Tibet and Tibets ruling monks that have been brushed under the carpet. This is a must read for the layperson seeking more information on Tibet and for the "Tibetian" expert to geta whollistic understanding of this issue. 

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"Tibet is Burning, U.N. Sleeping! Wake Up, Wake Up, United Nations!"

"Tibet is Burning, U.N. Sleeping!" "China lies, people die!" "Wake Up, Wake Up, United Nations!" "United Nations, where are you?" The U.N. is silent as China...
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Situation inside Occupied Tibet: Video

Occupied Tibet undercovered : Want the truth about Tibet?
DOSID's insight:

Video; An undercover expose

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