Children and Youth
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Children and Youth
Issues, Opportunities and Organziations related to children and youth
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American Academy of Pediatrics Issues New Recommendations On #ScreenTime and Exposure to Cell Phones // EduResearcher

American Academy of Pediatrics Issues New Recommendations On #ScreenTime and Exposure to Cell Phones // EduResearcher | Children and Youth | Scoop.it

"The American Academy of Pediatrics has recently issued two new sets of recommendations on media use for children.  At first glance, popular news headlines suggest elimination of the previous “no screens before age two” recommendations (see NPR’s American Academy of Pediatrics Lifts ‘No Screens Under 2’ Rule and KQED’s American Academy of Pediatrics Says Some Screen Time is Okay for Kids Under Two). However, close examination of the new guidelines reveal nuanced suggestions that maintain a primary focus on limiting tech usage. What appear to be obscured in public discussions are the same AAP organization’s recommendations issued just months earlier, specifically encouraging parents to reduce children’s exposures to cell phone radiation.

For ease of access, both sets of recommendations are provided in this post.
 
American Academy of Pediatrics Issues New Recommendations for Children’s Media Use

“Healthy Digital Media Use Habits for Babies, Toddlers & Preschoolers
Media in all forms, including TV, computers, and smartphones can affect how children feel, learn, think, and behave. However, parents (you) are still the most important influence.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) encourages you to help your children develop healthy media use habits early on. Read on to learn more.”…


“What About Apps and Digital Books?
Most apps advertised as “educational” aren’t proven to be effective and they don’t encourage co-viewing or co-play that help young children learn. Also, most educational apps target rote skills, such as ABCs and shapes. These skills are only one part of school readiness. The skills young children need to learn for success in school (and life) such as impulse control, managing emotions, and creative, flexible thinking, are best learned through unstructured and social play with family and friends in the real world.

Digital books (“eBooks”) that have lots of sound and visual effects can sometimes distract children, who then “miss the story” and don’t learn as well as they would from a print book.

If you plan to read e-books to your children:

Choose e-books that don’t have too many “bells and whistles.”Read e-books with your children (parent-child interaction around books is one of the most important factors to a child’s success at reading and literacy).

Why Limit Media Use?
Overuse of digital media may place your child at risk of:

Not enough sleep. Young children with more media exposure or who have a TV,computer, or mobile device in their bedrooms sleep less and fall asleep later at night. Even babies can be overstimulated by screens and miss the sleep they need to grow.Delays in learning and social skills. Children who watch too much TV in infancy and preschool years can show delays in attention, thinking, language, and social skills. One of the reasons for the delays could be because they interact less with parents and family. Parents who keep the TV on or focus on their own digital media miss precious opportunities to interact with their children and help them learn. See Parents of Young Children: Put Down Your Smartphones.Obesity. Heavy media use during preschool years is linked to weight gain and risk of childhood obesity. Food advertising and snacking while watching TV can promote obesity. Also, children who overuse media are less apt to be active with healthy, physical play.Behavior problems. Violent content on TV and screens can contribute to behavior problems in children, either because they are scared and confused by what they see, or they try to mimic on-screen characters.

Other Tips for Parents, Families, and Caregivers

Do not feel pressured to introduce technology early. Media interfaces are intuitive and children can learn quickly.Monitor children’s media. For example, know what apps are used or downloaded.Test apps before your child uses them, play together, and ask your child what he or she thinks about the app.Turn off TVs and other devices when not in use. Background media can distract from parent-child interaction and child play, which are both very important in child language and social-emotional development.Keep bedrooms, mealtimes, and parent-child playtimes screen free and unplugged for children and parents. Turn off phones or set to “do not disturb”during these times.Avoid exposure to devices or screens 1 hour before bedtime. Remove devices from bedrooms before bed.Avoid using media as the only way to calm your children. Although media maybe used to soothe children, such as during a medical procedure or airplane flight,using media as a strategy to calm could lead to problems with a child’s own ability with limit setting and managing emotions. Ask your child’s doctor for help if needed.Develop a Family Media Use plan for you and your family.Remember that your opinion counts. TV, video-game, and other media producers, and sponsors pay attention to the views of the public. Let a TV station know if you like a program, or contact video game companies if the content is too violent. For more information, visit the Federal Communications Commission(FCC) website.Encourage your school and community to advocate for better media programs and for healthier habits. For example, organize a “Screen-Free Week” in your town with other parents, teachers, and neighbors.

Additional Information from HealthyChildren.org (American Academy of Pediatrics)

How to Make a Family Media Use PlanHealthy Sleep Habits: How Many Hours Does Your Child Need?How Virtual Violence Impacts Children’s Behavior: Steps for Parents10 No-Cost, Screen-Free Activities to Play with Your PreschoolerObesity Prevention: AAP Policy Explained“

The related recommendations below on cell phone use were issued by the same American Academy of Pediatrics, yet appear to be receiving much less media attention.  American Academy of Pediatrics Issues New Recommendations to “Reduce Exposure to Cell Phones”: Nation’s largest group of children’s doctors responds to new government study linking cell phone radiation to cancer.

“In response to the U.S. National Toxicology Program study results finding exposure to wireless radiation significantly increased the prevalence of highly malignant heart and brain cancers in rodents, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued specific recommendations to reduce wireless cell phone exposure and updated their online resources for parents concerning cell phones and wireless devices.

“They’re not toys. They have radiation that is emitted from them and the more we can keep it off the body and use (the phone) in other ways, it will be safer,” said Jennifer A. Lowry, M.D., FAACT, FAAP, chair of the AAP Council on Environmental Health Executive Committee in the AAPs press release on the NTP Study Results.

“The findings of brain tumors (gliomas) and malignant schwann cell tumors of the heart in the NTP study, as well as DNA damage in brain cells, present a major public health concern because these occurred in the same types of cells that have been reported to develop into tumors in epidemiological studies of adult cell phone users,” stated Ronald L. Melnick, PhD, the National Institutes of Health toxicologist who lead the NTP study design and senior advisor to the Environmental Health Trust. “For children the cancer risks may be greater than that for adults because of greater penetration and absorption of cell phone radiation in the brains of children and because the developing nervous system of children is more susceptible to tissue-damaging agents. Based on this new information, regulatory agencies need to make strong recommendations for consumers to take precautionary measures and avoid close contact with their cell phones, and especially limit or avoid use of cell phones by children.”

The AAP has updated their Healthy Children Webpage on Cell Phones entitled Cell Phone Radiation & Children’s Health: What Parents Need to Know. The webpage reiterated children’s unique vulnerability to cell phone radiation stating, “Another problem is that the cell phone radiation test used by the FCC is based on the devices’ possible effect on large adults—not children. Children’s skulls are thinner and can absorb more radiation.”

The AAP issued the following cell phone safety tips specifically to reduce exposure to wireless radiation:

“Use text messaging when possible, and use cell phones in speaker mode or with the use of hands-free kits.When talking on the cell phone, try holding it an inch or more away from your head.Make only short or essential calls on cell phones.Avoid carrying your phone against the body like in a pocket, sock, or bra. Cell phone manufacturers can’t guarantee that the amount of radiation you’re absorbing will be at a safe level.Do not talk on the phone or text while driving. This increases the risk of automobile crashes.Exercise caution when using a phone or texting while walking or performing other activities. “Distracted walking” injuries are also on the rise.If you plan to watch a movie on your device, download it first, then switch to airplane mode while you watch in order to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure.Keep an eye on your signal strength (i.e. how many bars you have). The weaker your cell signal, the harder your phone has to work and the more radiation it gives off. It’s better to wait until you have a stronger signal before using your device.Avoid making calls in cars, elevators, trains, and buses. The cell phone works harder to get a signal through metal, so the power level increases.Remember that cell phones are not toys or teething items.

Even though the cell phone manual contains specific instructions that say do not carry the phone next to the body, the US government does not publicize this information nor mandate companies inform the public, leaving most people unaware of potential hazards, unwittingly allowing their young children to play with them like toys,” stated Devra Davis MPH, PhD, president of the Environmental Health Trust pointing to the Berkeley Cell Phone Right To Know Ordinance being challenged in court this month.

In 2012, the AAP published Pediatric Environmental Health, 3rd Edition recommending, “exposures can be reduced by encouraging children to use text messaging when possible, make only short and essential calls on cellular phones, use hands free kits and wired headsets and maintain the cellular phone an inch or more away from the head.”

Since 2012, the AAP has supported the Federal Cell Phone Right to Know Legislation and has written letters to the FCC calling on the federal government to review and strengthen radiation standards for wireless devices in an effort to protect children’s health.

Links
AAP Healthy Children.org Cell Phone Radiation & Children’s Health: What Parents Need to Know

AAP responds to study showing link between cell phone radiation, tumors in rats May 27, 2016

2012 AAP Letter in Support of the Cell Phone Right to Know Act

2013 AAP Letter to the FCC calling for a review of RF guidelines”

From: http://www.releasewire.com/press-releases/american-academy-of-pediatrics-issues-new-recommendations-to-reduce-exposure-to-cell-phones-726805.htm ;

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For main post on EduResearcher, see: https://eduresearcher.com/2016/10/25/media/ ;

For readers interested in additional updates and research on screen time, development, learning, and health, see here.

 

 


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The CDC is investigating a cluster of teen suicides in Palo Alto

The CDC is investigating a cluster of teen suicides in Palo Alto | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Palo Alto’s teen suicide rate — 10 deaths over seven years — is four or five times higher than the national average. In February, the Santa Clara County Health Department asked the Centers for Disease Control to visit and investigate the crisis. The CDC report is pending. But of note to many mental health professionals here: 40 percent of the victims have been Asian American. In Palo Alto Unified School District, over 40 percent of students identify as Asian.
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Developing Voices: Students Are Your Allies

Developing Voices: Students Are Your Allies | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Honoring student voice is really about empowering students -- and is really a question of how much power adults are willing to give up.
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100,000 Opportunities Initiative

100,000 Opportunities Initiative | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Our goal is to create the nation’s largest employer-led private sector coalition focused on helping young people build skills and attain credentials, while connecting them to employment.
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Uneven Recovery Leaving Working Poor Families Behind, Report Finds

Uneven Recovery Leaving Working Poor Families Behind, Report Finds | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
According to the 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book, 18.7 million, or one in four children in the United States, lived in a working poor family in 2013....
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Why Boston Students Created A ‘Know Your Rights’ App

Why Boston Students Created A ‘Know Your Rights’ App | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
A group of Boston students have released what's believed to be the first app in the nation for students to hold staff accountable to honoring their rights.

 

[Picture Caption from linked page: Boston Student Advisory Council president Glorya Wornum, left, and BSAC member Ayomide Olumuyiwa show off the Boston Student Rights app in the hallway of Madison Park Technical Vocational High School. (Peter Balonon-Rosen/WBUR)]

 

http://learninglab.wbur.org/2015/06/16/why-boston-students-created-a-know-your-rights-app/


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This Author Is Exposing the Sexist Double Standard in Children's Literature

This Author Is Exposing the Sexist Double Standard in Children's Literature | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
"The assumption that books about girls are only for girls is so deeply ingrained it's not even noticed."
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Sticker Shock: Calculating the Full Price Tag for Youth Incarceration

Sticker Shock: Calculating the Full Price Tag for Youth Incarceration | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Our new report, Sticker Shock: Calculating the Full Price Tag for Youth Incarceration, provides estimates of the overall costs resulting from the negative outcomes associated with youth incarceration, costing taxpayers $8 billion to $21 billion each
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WEBINAR: Using Student Homelessness Data to Advocate on Behalf of Children and Families « Data Points

WEBINAR: Using Student Homelessness Data to Advocate on Behalf of Children and Families « Data Points | Children and Youth | Scoop.it

If you work on behalf of children and families who are homeless or are at risk of becoming homeless, this one-hour webinar is for you.

 

The story of California’s homeless students is largely a hidden one—many are doubled up with family and friends, while others live in shelters.

 

New data, however, show the extent of homelessness of California’s pre-K-12 students enrolled in public schools. Nearly 270,000 public school students in the state were homeless at some point in the 2012-2013 school year. That equates to about 4% of all California’s public school students, double the national average. 

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WEBINAR DATE: NOVEMBER 18, 2014

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National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect (NIS-4), 2004-2009 | Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation | Administration for Children and Families

National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect (NIS-4), 2004-2009 | Office of Planning, Research & Evaluation | Administration for Children and Families | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
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The NIS–4 data, collected in 2005 and 2006 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families, provide updated estimates of the number of children who are abused or neglected. NIS-4 data combine information about children whose incidence rates of maltreatment was investigated by child protective services with data on maltreated children identified by professionals. NIS-4 also provides information on the nature and severity of the maltreatment , as well as the characteristics of children, perpetrators, and families involved.

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U.S. Department of Justice - Office of Juvenile Justice and Prevention (OJJDP) Releases Law Enforcement Guide on Recognizing Child Abuse

OJJDP has published the guide “Recognizing When a Child’s Injury or Illness Is Caused by Abuse.” The guide provides information to help law enforcement differentiate between physical abuse and accidental injury during a child abuse investigation. The guide also identifies questions that law enforcement should address during an investigation, describes how to conduct a caretaker assessment when a child is injured, and highlights ways to work with the medical community to distinguish types of injuries and bruises.

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The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book - The Annie E. Casey Foundation

The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book - The Annie E. Casey Foundation | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
The 2014 KIDS COUNT Data Book, the 25th edition of the annual report on child well-being, finds that children in the United States continue have made gains in the areas of health, safety and education since 1990. As a result of the recession, however, the economic well-being of children remains a concern. 
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Sensitivity training for educators on foster youth issues needed, advocates say | EdSource Today

Sensitivity training for educators on foster youth issues needed, advocates say | EdSource Today | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Under the new school finance system, the state will soon be sending districts lists of their foster students so schools can direct more resources to them. Although the students will benefit, they fear their personal lives may be widely exposed and they may be stigmatized if educators don’t handle the information sensitively.
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Why Do Schools Stifle Kids' Movement?

Why Do Schools Stifle Kids' Movement? | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Children acquire knowledge by acting and then reflecting on their experiences, but such opportunities are increasingly rare in school.
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The Power of Art to Build Strong Youth and Heal Trauma

The Power of Art to Build Strong Youth and Heal Trauma | Children and Youth | Scoop.it

The arts create an off-ramp from the pipeline by engaging young people and empowering them. Art is not a distraction - but a diversionary tool for them to heal and tell their stories through spoken word, dance, poetry, performance art or a visual piece. Art provides freedom from the everyday struggles that our children and youth must navigate. It channels creativity and gives young people the power to be kids again by allowing them to reclaim their childhood. Art increases self-esteem and an understanding of culture and one’s history.

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Interrupting the School to Prison Pipeline Through Restorative Justice | Fania E. Davis

Interrupting the School to Prison Pipeline Through Restorative Justice | Fania E. Davis | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Our schools are creating pipelines to violence and incarceration instead of pathways to opportunity and success. Once ensnared, it's hard to escape from the system; juvenile incarceration is the strongest predictor of adult incarceration.
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Industry Leaders Are Taking Action On Youth Unemployment - The Rockefeller Foundation

Industry leaders in the United States are taking action against the youth unemployment challenge. Today, a growing coalition of 29 corporate employers, including Starbucks, Walmart, and JPMorgan Chase will gather in Chicago for the official launch of the 100,000 Opportunities Initiative. Over the next three years, this coalition of employers has committed to provide jobs, internships, apprenticeships, and training to 100,000 young people between the ages of 16 and 24 who are currently out of work and out of school—our nation’s opportunity youth.
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Health care for undocumented immigrant children: The right thing to do

Health care for undocumented immigrant children: The right thing to do | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
California has been at the forefront of forward-thinking rules that integrate millions of undocumented immigrants into civic life instead of demonizing them. It’s the Golden State’s version of immigration reform.The latest proposa
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AB 47 - The Preschool for All Act of 2015

AB 47 - The Preschool for All Act of 2015 | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Early Edge California is proud to sponsor AB 47 (McCarty) - the Preschool for All Act of 2015, which will ensure progress in meeting the commitment last year by Governor Brown and the Legislature to provide quality preschool to all low-income 4 year olds.
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EdSource: State program to help foster students not available to some

EdSource: State program to help foster students not available to some | Children and Youth | Scoop.it

About a third of California’s foster youth don’t receive state-funded tutoring and counseling services because they are living with relatives. Proposed legislation would change that.

 

Foster youth living with relatives cannot take advantage of the Foster Youth Servicesprogram, typically run by county offices of education. The program provides counseling and tutoring. Staff members also act as advocates and mentors for foster youth, determining their needs and identifying gaps in services.

 

An October 2014 report on the program by the California Department of Education found that it helped foster students – who have the highest dropout rate of any group of students – improve academically, complete high school and avoid being expelled.

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UNITY (Urban Networks to Increase Thriving Youth through Violence Prevention)

UNITY (Urban Networks to Increase Thriving Youth through Violence Prevention) | Children and Youth | Scoop.it

UNITY builds support for effective, sustainable efforts to prevent violence before it occurs, so that urban youth can thrive in safe environments with ample opportunities and supportive relationships.


UNITY utilizes a public health, or prevention, approach to violence. Prevention is a viable and critical component of a balanced approach that also includes intervention and enforcement/suppression. Quality prevention incorporates data collection and analysis to pinpoint the populations and locations at greatest risk, identify risk and resilience factors, and develop and utilize effective strategies to prevent violence before it occurs, and to reduce the impact of risk factors and the reoccurrence of violence. This approach engages multiple sectors working in coordination with each other and with community members. Our efforts are two-fold-we support cities in developing, implementing and evaluating effective and sustainable prevention efforts, and we increase awareness of what is needed to prevent violence in the first place and build momentum for such approaches so that urban communities can have peaceful streets and thriving youth.

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Schools warned on legalities of anti-bullying

Schools warned on legalities of anti-bullying | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Citing an “ever-increasing” number of complaints about the bullying of students with disabilities, the federal government issued a letter this week reminding schools of their legal responsibility to stop such bullying or risk violating federal anti-discrimination laws.
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Aspen Institute Re-Invests in Innovative Community Collaboratives to Engage "Opportunity Youth"

Aspen Institute Re-Invests in Innovative Community Collaboratives to Engage "Opportunity Youth" | Children and Youth | Scoop.it

During the past year, OYIF grantees have demonstrated early success by bringing together the K-12 systems; community colleges and other postsecondary providers; municipal and state governments; national and local philanthropy and nonprofits; and private sector leaders in their communities, to design education and employment reconnection strategies for young people who have extraordinary barriers to success.

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UCLA summer program supports foster youth | EdSource

UCLA summer program supports foster youth | EdSource | Children and Youth | Scoop.it

Instability — multiple homes and multiple schools — is one of the biggest obstacles to academic success for foster children. But about two dozen high school students in foster care in Southern California are benefiting from one constant in their lives: a program each summer at UCLA aimed at keeping them on track academically and preparing them for college.

 

The First Star Academy is a pilot program for foster youth run by First Star, a national nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., that focuses on helping abused and neglected children. For the past four years, the First Star Academy has brought the foster students to the UCLA campus each summer and meets with the students one Saturday each month during the school year.

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Boys and Men of Color

Boys and Men of Color | Children and Youth | Scoop.it
Welcome to the website for the Executives’ Alliance to Expand Opportunity for Boys and Men of Color. The Executives’ Alliance, launched in April 2013, is a growing network of national, regional, and community foundations that are investing in supporting positive outcomes for boys and men of color. Members of the Executives’ Allliance have formed a public-private partnership with the White House called My Brother’s Keeper. Learn more about his unprecedented effort here. Also view the statement of support issued by the Executives’ Alliance.
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