Child Labor Throughout Time
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The most important problem is the children dying. Children as young as 6 years old during the industrial revolution worked hard hours for little or no pay. Children sometimes worked up to 19 hours a day, with a one-hour total break. This was a little bit on the extreme, but it was not common for the children who worked in factories to work 12-14 hours with the same minimal breaks. Not only were these children subject to long hours, but also, they were in horrible conditions. Large, heavy, and dangerous equipment was very common for children to be using or working near. Many accidents occurred injuring or killing children on the job. Not until the Factory Act of 1833 did things improve. Children were paid only a fraction of what an adult would get, and sometimes factory owners would get away with paying them nothing. This child labor issue has been going on since the 1870’s. This has been going on for a long while. These bad days of evil suffering and torment, this has affected each and every person that is involved with the factories and farms. Everybody that is suffering really is affected by this because they have to deal with this for the rest of their lives. The people are stuck. Their lives are basically ruined. Everyday, everyone’s life is at risk because of all the dangerous things that is going on occasionally and constantly and continuously.

The muckraker of Child Labor is John Spargo. John Spargo is connected to child labor because he wrote a book called The Bitter Cry of the Children in 1906. He was focused on the dangerous and difficult lives of child workers. Yes, John Spargo exposed the truth when he went to the factories and had compassion for the children. He wrote a book about them because of all of the problems the children has to go through constantly and occasionally. He felt their hurt on the inside. John changed the pain of children. No, this issue doesn’t continue because children aren’t allowed to work until they’ve reached a certain age. Sometimes, well mostly the legal age of 18, but the adult-hood of age 21.

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Progressive Era: Child Labor

This Website Shows a Timeline of everything that has occured throught the Progressive Era.

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India Shaken by Plight of 13-Year-Old Maid

India Shaken by Plight of 13-Year-Old Maid | Child Labor Throughout Time | Scoop.it

The International Labor Organization has found that India has 12.6 million laborers between the ages of 5 and 14, with roughly 20 percent working as domestic help. Other groups place the figure at 45 million or higher. Unicef has said India has more child laborers than any other country in the world.

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Childhood Lost - Child Labor During the Industrial Revolution

Childhood Lost - Child Labor During the Industrial Revolution | Child Labor Throughout Time | Scoop.it

In the years that followed the Civil War, known as the “Rise of Industrial America, 1876 – 1900” on the American Memory Timeline of the Library of Congress Learning Page, the United States emerged as an industrial giant. When studying history we see that existing industries flourished and new opportunities developed, such as petroleum refining, steel manufacturing, and the widespread use of electrical power. The use of railroads grew exponentially and industry and services once in isolated areas of the country entered into a national market economy.

This era of industrial growth transformed American society creating a new class of wealthy entrepreneurs and a comfortable middle class. The increase in industry resulted in a growth among the blue collar working class. This labor force was made up of millions of newly arrived immigrants and vast numbers of families migrating from rural areas to cities with the hope of job security and prosperity.

With a dream of a better life, rural families relocated to the cities to find work.  Sadly, most were disappointed when they arrived and discovered that the truth was not as “rosey” as they had been led to believe. The jobs available required long hours and offered little pay. In most situations, every able family member was needed to work to simply keep the family above the poverty level.  Those working included children as young as three.

Young children working endured some of the harshest conditions. Workdays would often be 10 to 14 hours with minimal breaks during the shift.  Factories employing children were often very dangerous places leading to injuries and even deaths.  Machinery often ran so quickly that little fingers, arms and legs could easily get caught. Beyond the equipment, the environment was a threat to children as well as factories put out fumes and toxins.  When inhaled by children these most certainly could result in illness, chronic conditions or disease.

Children working in rural areas were not faring much better. Harvesting crops in extreme temperatures for long hours was considered normal for these children. Work in agriculture was typically less regulated than factory duties. Farm work was often not considered dangerous or extraneous for children, even though they carried their weight and more in loads of produce and handled dangerous tools.

Beyond the topic of safety, children working lengthy hours had limited access to education. Many families relied on income earned by each family member and did not allow children to attend school at all. Those fortunate enough to be enrolled often attended only portions of a school day or only a few weeks at a time. Library of Congress Learning Page Features and Activities Accessed 9.24.08

Reforming child labor laws and creating new laws that would enforce a minimum working age, prohibiting dangerous jobs and conditions and establishing maximum hours children could work was not a popular endeavor. It took several years and many attempts by Congress to pass national laws designed to improve working conditions and regulations relative to children in the workforce. 

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Child labour/Modern day Slavery

Child labour/Modern day Slavery | Child Labor Throughout Time | Scoop.it

Child labour is like modern day slavery.Child labour (U.S. child labor) refers to the employment of children at regular and sustained labour. This article shows us modern day slavery/ child labor

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Field and Farm Work

Field and Farm Work | Child Labor Throughout Time | Scoop.it

"The boys can keep up with me all right, and all day long," the father said. Begin at 6 a.m. and work until 6 p.m. with an hour off at noon.

 

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Documenting "The Other Half": The Social Reform Photography of Jacob Riis and Lewis Hine

Documenting "The Other Half": The Social Reform Photography of Jacob Riis and Lewis Hine | Child Labor Throughout Time | Scoop.it

Concern for the conditions of the poor gave way to a growing interest in the rights of the working class. One of the most persistent causes of Progressive Era reformers was child labor reform.

The 1890 census revealed that more than one million children, ten to fifteen years old, worked in America. That number increased to two million by 1910. Industries employed children as young as five or six to work as many as eighteen to twenty hours a day.

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The Fight to End Child Labor — History.com Video

The Fight to End Child Labor — History.com Video | Child Labor Throughout Time | Scoop.it
In a History of the Holidays video, discover how unions put an end to child labor in factories during the early 1900's, along with excessive hours and pay cuts.
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