Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing
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Work–family life course patterns and work participation in later life

Work–family life course patterns and work participation in later life | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Many developed nations seek to increase older people’s work participation. Work and family are linked to paid work in later life, and to each other. Few studies combined work and family histories...
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Variation in association between breastfeeding and childhood wheeze | SHEER | NPEU

Variation in association between breastfeeding and childhood wheeze | SHEER | NPEU | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
The National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit (NPEU) is a multidisciplinary research unit based at the University of Oxford. Our work involves running randomised controlled trials, national surveillance programmes and surveys, confidential enquiries, aetiological studies and a disease register.
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Ageing and mental health: Pictures of being old in the UK and Japan

Ageing and mental health: Pictures of being old in the UK and Japan | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it

We are living in an era of ageing populations. Making connections with other people is said to promote the mental health and longevity of older people. In this seminar, Dr Shankar will address loneliness in older people living in England, some of the factors affecting loneliness in later life, and...

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Tackling mental health problems in children and young people – the importance of early intervention

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'I never thought I was beautiful': Neelam Gill and the fight against the pressure to be pale | Life and style | The Guardian

'I never thought I was beautiful': Neelam Gill and the fight against the pressure to be pale | Life and style | The Guardian | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
The Burberry model – alongside a growing number of Asian women – are speaking out against colourism and prejudiced notions of beauty
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Written evidence - ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society and Health (ICLS)

Written evidence submitted by ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies in Society and Health (ICLS) (SMH0128)   Submitted by:   Professor Amanda Sacker, ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies, University College London Professor Yvonne Kelly, ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies, University College London Dr Cara Booker, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex     Overview   1.1.  In a recently published research paper, we examined gender differences in the associations between the trends in social media interactions and well-being among 10-15 year olds in the UK.   1.2.  The impacts of social media interactions on well-being of children over time are neither well researched nor well understood. Our research hints at the need for interventions to protect and promote the well-being of young people, particularly girls, who our research indicates are more likely to become over- dependent on ‘likes’ and comments and, in the words of the Children’s Commissioner for England, start “adapting their offline lives to fit an online image”, something she believes can lead to an anxiety about ‘keeping up appearances’ as they get older.     Key findings At age 10, 50 per cent of girls and 55 per cent of boys said they had no internet access or spent no time on social media. At 15 years, this dropped to 8 and 10 per cent respectively. Ten per cent of ten year-old girls reported spending one to three hours a day (compared with 7 per cent of boys) and this increased to 43 per cent of girls at age 15 (and 31 per cent of boys). At age 10 only a very small per cent of girls/boys were spending 4 hours plus a day on social media. But by the age of 15, that rose to 16 per cent of girls and 10 per cent of boys. For both boys and girls, levels of happiness decreased between the ages of 10 and 15, however the decrease was greater for girls than for boys. Additionally, whilst emotional and behavioural problems increased for girls between the ages of 10 and 15, they decreased for boys. 10 year-old girls who spent an hour or more on a school day chatting online had more emotional and behavioural problems than girls of the same age who spent less or no time on social media. In addition, the number of problems increased as they got older.     Data   Our information came from five waves of the UK’s largest household survey, Understanding Society, which interviews all members of households aged 10 and over annually. In total our sample was nearly 10,000 young people aged 10-15.   They were asked:   1. If they belonged to a social web-site and then how many hours they spent ‘chatting’ or ‘interacting with friends’ on a normal school day. They could select a range of responses from none to more than 7 hours. 2. About satisfaction with schoolwork, friends, family, appearance, school and life as a whole and this was used to create an overall happiness score. 3. About any emotional and behavioural difficulties they might be facing using the well-established Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) with a higher score indicating more problems. Comments It is difficult to unpick why girls are more affected than boys but we believe it may say something about the different ways in which boys and girls interact with social media. Girls may be more likely than boys to compare their lives with those of friends and peers and these could lead to feelings of inadequacy, lower levels of satisfaction and poorer wellbeing. Boys may be more likely to be gaming (not covered here) rather than interacting on sites such as Facebook and Snapchat and changes in their wellbeing could be more related to gaming success or skill. Recommendations   Our evidence adds weight to recent calls for the technology industry to look at in-built time limits.   Interventions (peer/parent/school-led) focused specifically on young girls as they prepare to move to senior school could be important   Helping young girls understand the positives and the negatives of time on social media     Additional links       April 2018
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Having a family – how might the decision affect the length of your working life?

Having a family – how might the decision affect the length of your working life? | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Across the developed world, people are living longer. In response to this, governments are looking for ways to encourage people to work for longer. In the UK, the State Pension age is being raised …
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Staying at work longer – a matter of geography?

Staying at work longer – a matter of geography? | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
There are lots of reasons why people end their working lives early, and the relationships between those reasons are complex. We know, for instance, that if you’re a carer for someone close to you, …
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Children Using Social Media Unhappier As Adolescents, Girls More So Than Boys

Children Using Social Media Unhappier As Adolescents, Girls More So Than Boys | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
When studying the negative impact of social media, age has been considered a major determinant. But what about gender?
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Social media use at age 10 could reduce wellbeing of adolescent girls | UKEdChat

Social media use at age 10 could reduce wellbeing of adolescent girls | UKEdChat | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Social media use may have different effects on well-being in adolescent boys and girls, according [...]
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Social media negatively affects teen girls more than boys | Business Standard News

Social media negatively affects teen girls more than boys | Business Standard News | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it

Read more about Social media negatively affects teen girls more than boys on Business Standard. Social media use may have different effects on wellbeing in adolescent boys and girls, according to a recent research.Researchers at the University of Essex and UCL found an association between increased time spent on social media in early


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Social media 'may harm wellbeing of teenage girls'

Social media 'may harm wellbeing of teenage girls' | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Girls who spend a lot of time on social media at age 10 are more likely to encounter declining levels of wellbeing during adolescence than those who do not, say researchers.

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Bedtime: How going to sleep at irregular times could be harmful to kids

Bedtime: How going to sleep at irregular times could be harmful to kids | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it

How strict are YOU on bedtimes?

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Why it’s time to address workplace racism as a matter of health and safety

Why it’s time to address workplace racism as a matter of health and safety | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Fifty years on from the UK’s first piece of legislation outlawing racial discrimination in employment, Stephen Ashe & James Nazroo look at what’s changed and whether racism in the workplace needs to be looked at in a different light. It has been shown repeatedly that reoccurring exposure to racism has serious negative long-term effects on people’s mental health. Over the past 12 months, Theresa May has warned public services there will be “nowhere to hide” if they treat people differently on the basis of their race. Yet the latest research suggests that the existing legislation isn’t doing enough to improve the situation. Is it time to start thinking about workplace racism, not just as an equality and diversity issue, but also as a serious matter of health and safety? Impact of racism in the workplace The Trade Union Congress’ (TUC) 2016-2017 Racism at Work survey is the latest piece of research to confirm that workplace racism has a considerable impact on people’s physical and mental health. This raises an important question: should workplace racism also be considered an issue of health and safety rather than just falling under the remit of equality and diversity? Of the 5,191 people who took the TUC’s survey, over half of those from an Asian, Black or Mixed heritage background reported that workplace racism had a negative impact on their mental health. At the same time, more than a quarter participants from an Asian, Black or Mixed heritage background reported that workplace racism had a negative impact on their physical health, while a similar number said that workplace racism had led to them taking sick leave. What is more, over one in ten non-white respondents reported that they had experienced racist violence at work. The multiple and cumulative effects of workplace racism are powerfully captured in the following statement provided by a TUC survey participants: I’ve had three workplaces where I’ve had to bring grievances that were race related (racist in nature)…You can never absolutely prove it…It’s insidious. The ignoring you is as bad as the shouting at you…I ended up on anti-depressants and suicidal. It makes you forget who you are, your strengths, your abilities. I’m a skilled intelligent woman who’s worked for 35 years and I ended up barely able to send an email. It’s like the perpetrators don’t realise. Leaves you powerless. I’m having to leave my job and take a 10k wage reduction for a short-term post instead of my permanent one. It’s either that or my life. My children/family have insisted. They want me alive. The findings from the TUC survey support our analysis of the 2015 Business in the Community (BITC) Race at Work survey, which also found that workplace racism had a considerable impact on people’s emotional and psychological wellbeing. Some 24,457 people took part in the BITC survey, with more than 5,000 participants providing personal statements. When analysing these statements we similarly found that workplace racism had also resulted in a considerable number of people experiencing anxiety, stress and depression. Like the TUC survey, a significant number of BITC survey participants also reported being subjected to intimidation and racist violence at work. It is perhaps most worrying that many participants, across both surveys, reported that racism was a reoccurring part of their everyday working lives. This is particularly disturbing given that recent research by colleagues in the Centre on Dynamics of Ethnicity has shown that repeated exposure to racism has serious negative long-term effects on people’s mental health. Existing legislative landscape Fifty years ago Harold Wilson’s Labour government amended the 1965 Race Relations in order to outlaw racial discrimination in employment for the first time. Some 33 years later, the 2001 Race Equality Duty placed the first ever legal obligation on public authorities to positively promote equality rather than simply avoiding discrimination. And yet, racism and racial inequality are still staple features of the British economy. According to the Health and Safety Executive, the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 stipulate that ‘Employers must do whatever is ‘reasonably practicable’ to ensure ‘that workers and others are protected from anything that may cause harm, effectively controlling any risks to injury or health that could arise in the workplace’. As our colleague Tarani Chandola also recently argued, anti-discrimination statutes are ‘potentially’ implicated in cases related to work stress, notably the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 and the Equality Act 2010. Following on from the PM’s Race Disparity Audit, the recent announcement that £90 million will be made available to address racial inequality in youth unemployment is welcome. At the same time, it is profoundly disappointing that Margot James, Minister for Small Business, Consumers & Corporate Responsibility responded to the recent McGregor-Smith Review by stating that We believe that in the first instance, the best method is a business-led, voluntary approach and not legislation as a way of bringing about lasting change… We therefore… will monitor progress and stand ready to act if sufficient progress is not delivered. In light of the fact that it is fifty years since the Race Relations Amendment Act was introduced, forty years since the introduction of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and 17 years since the introduction of the first public sector Race Equality Duty, the TUC and BITC surveys provide further compelling evidence that the existing legislative arrangements have not delivered ‘sufficient progress’. The TUC and BITC surveys suggest that the time for joined up thinking and consequential action is now, particularly in terms of ensuring the implementation of existing legislation is effectively monitored and enforced, and that employers are held to account. The Health Safety Executive has already noted that employers have a ‘duty to protect the health, safety and welfare of their employees‘. People have the right to go to work free from both the threat of racist violence and intimidation, as well as the impact racism has been proven to have on people’s physical and mental health. It is time to start thinking about workplace racism, not just as an equality and diversity issue, but also as a serious matter of health and safety.   If you would like to share your experiences of workplace racism and the impact this has had on your physical and mental health, click here to take 2018 Race at Work survey. It takes around 13 minutes to complete the survey. All answers treated anonymously. Stephen Ashe leads the Centre on Dynamics of Ethnicity’s Racism at Work Project. James Nazroo is Professor of Sociology and Director of Centre on Dynamics of Ethnicity at The University of Manchester, researching inequalities in relation to later life, ethnicity and race, and health. Their report based on the 2016/2017 TUC Racism at Work Survey will be published later this month.
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Childhood disadvantage and negative health behaviour in adults

Childhood disadvantage and negative health behaviour in adults | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it

Heavy drinking and smoking, poor diet and a lack of physical activity have been shown to go hand in hand in adults from more disadvantaged backgrounds. But new research from ICLS PhD student, Claire Mawditt, hints that, contrary to previous evidence, being disadvantaged as a pre-adolescent child is not in itself a predictor of those sorts of negative health behaviours later in life. Making use of data from the 1958 and 1970 British Birth Cohorts, the research traced the social and economic positions of  cohort members when they were aged 10/11 through to age 33/34, when their health behaviours were also examined. Although being socially disadvantaged as a youngster was associated with later disadvantage, there was no link with clustered negative health behaviours. Commenting on the implications of her research, Claire said: "Our findings suggest that being disadvantaged as a youngster doesn't necessarily mean you will drink and smoke heavily, have a poor diet and do little or no exercise as an adult. This provides scope for policy makers to consider interventions at various points in adolescence and young adulthood, and makes it clear that it's never too late to improve their health and their lives." She added that "decent jobs, fair wages and welfare provisions that ensured adequate income to meet basic needs" were key and called on policy makers to avoid blaming individuals and instead acknowledge the "unequal distribution of resources that shape adult lifestyles". Failure to do so, her research concludes, could result in disadvantages persisting across cohorts and generations. Social influences on health-related behaviour clustering during adulthood in two British Birth Cohort studies is research by Claire Mawditt, Amanda Sacker, Annie Britton, Yvonne Kelly and Noriko Cable and is published in Preventive Medicine.

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Does education and job status affect the length of our working lives?

Does education and job status affect the length of our working lives? | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Who is most at risk of leaving work due to poor health? In a major international research project, Ewan Carr from the renEWL team has worked with colleagues at UCL, King’s College and Queen Mary Un…
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Time to ACE the way we measure the bad things that happen to children

Time to ACE the way we measure the bad things that happen to children | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) have been a hot topic for policy work in child health and development in recent months. The Select Committee for Science and Technology announced an inquiry int…
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Social media lowers girls' self-esteem more than boys, new study shows | London

Social media lowers girls' self-esteem more than boys, new study shows | London | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Teenage girls who use social media suffer more emotional and social problems than boys, research suggests. The happiness levels of nearly 10,000 girls and boys were tracked between the ages of 10 and 15. Girls who spent more than an hour a day on social media from the age of 10 were more likely to suffer problems.
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Wheezing: Can breastfeeding for longer make a difference?

Wheezing: Can breastfeeding for longer make a difference? | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Public health bodies put a lot of effort into encouraging mothers to breastfeed, and for good reasons. Successive studies have shown breastfeeding has a range of health benefits, including a lower risk of wheezing illnesses, which can be linked to asthma. But which of these illnesses are most likely to respond? Is a breastfed child…
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Never too early to intervene to get us working longer

Never too early to intervene to get us working longer | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Working for longer is something we are all having to get our heads around. It’s certainly a priority for the Government, which wants to encourage more older people into satisfying jobs that will he…
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Social Media Use At Age 10 Could Reduce Wellbeing Of Adolescent Girls –

Social Media Use At Age 10 Could Reduce Wellbeing Of Adolescent Girls – | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
Social media use may have different effects on wellbeing in adolescent boys and girls, according to research published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. Researchers at the University of…
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Twice as many girls using social media for more than three hours a day

Twice as many girls using social media for more than three hours a day | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it
They use social media far more than boys on average.

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ESRC's curator insight, March 26, 6:44 AM

The data was collected from the ESRC-funded Understanding Society, the UK household longitudinal study.

The figures were based on a survey of 4,410 children in 2011/12 and 3,616 in 2015/16.

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New research shows social media ‘negatively affects adolescent girls more than boys’ | BT

New research shows social media ‘negatively affects adolescent girls more than boys’ | BT | Lifecourse research on health and wellbeing | Scoop.it

Research has found girls spend more time on social media than boys by the age of 10 and report being unhappier as they get older.


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Latest videos - Seminars: Patterns of alcohol consumption across the life course

This seminar combined presentations of findings from two research projects focusing on consumption of alcohol across the life course. The first project looked at drinking in adolescence, and the second considered the health implications of drinking across the life course. Speakers Yvonne Kelly (Professor of Lifecourse Epidemiology at UCL) has published extensively over the past 20 …
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