Chemistry
9 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro from Chemistry
Scoop.it!

First pictures of hydrogen bonds unveiled | Chemistry World

First pictures of hydrogen bonds unveiled | Chemistry World | Chemistry | Scoop.it
Observation of intermolecular interactions in quinolines could help to settle the nature of this kind of bonding

 

Peering at molecular structures is what chemists do. Technology that can improve the way that they see this world can have a huge impact on the field. In one such leap, researchers in China report the first visualisation of a hydrogen bond using atomic force microscopy (AFM).


Via NatProdChem, Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
more...
Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

Every 16 Days About 72% of You is Replaced – Expanded Consciousness

Every 16 Days About 72% of You is Replaced – Expanded Consciousness | Chemistry | Scoop.it
If every atom in our body is replaced each year,who are we if we are not our atoms and we are not our cells?http://t.co/X40tn9fBhP via@po_st
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro from Natural Products Chemistry Breaking News
Scoop.it!

First pictures of hydrogen bonds unveiled | Chemistry World

First pictures of hydrogen bonds unveiled | Chemistry World | Chemistry | Scoop.it
Observation of intermolecular interactions in quinolines could help to settle the nature of this kind of bonding

 

Peering at molecular structures is what chemists do. Technology that can improve the way that they see this world can have a huge impact on the field. In one such leap, researchers in China report the first visualisation of a hydrogen bond using atomic force microscopy (AFM).


Via NatProdChem
more...
Rescooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier

Wearables will soon analyze your body chemistry to make you healthier | Chemistry | Scoop.it

A lot of the focus in wearable computing has been on delivering products that help everyday users monitor some of the more basic activity traits, such as steps taken and heart rate. While these are certainly useful metrics for health monitoring, they do not paint the full picture.

 

Computational biologists instead study the chemical changes that occur in people’s bodies with the help of optical sensors, non-invasive devices that use the red-to-near-infrared spectral region to assess the chemical changes that occur in the user’s blood vessels, among other places.

 

By leveraging this cutting-edge technology and wearable computing, we are equipped to understand the changes that occur in a person’s body at a whole new level. The implications of this change span from improved training of athletes to better management of chronic diseases and healthcare.

 

 Some interesting recent cases in research that show the potential for disruption include:

 

Researchers at the National Technical University of Athens have helped individuals self-manage diabetes by stimulating the function of an artificial pancreas with fully embedded wearable systems. A paper in the Journal of Biomechanics shows promising results for wearables in athletic training. Scientists mapped out the physiology of athletes’ ski-jumps in order to determine the biological constraints of each individual’s approach. By comparing data across 22 different skiiers, the scientists were able to determine that the wearable system was a very promising tool for training that captured information beyond the capacity of a traditional camera.Researchers at Texas A&M University are investigating the use of optical sensors to interact with dermally-implanted microparticle sensors. This technology could enable cost cutting and continuous blood chemistry monitoring.Optical sensors used to monitor both athletic performance and overall health by researchers at the Dublin Institute of Technology. The sophisticated sensors interpret user’s sweat particles in order to deduce what is going on at a biological level. One of the sensors measured pH levels of sweat particles in order to deduce dehydration while athletes were running. This is a huge stride for activity tracking because it represents real time monitoring of athletic performance and biological signals
Via nrip
more...
Sue Gould's curator insight, October 11, 2013 1:43 AM

Wearable computers are here.  

Dan Baxter's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:20 AM

The next step for quantified and teleheath sensors

Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

A Boy And His Atom: The World's Smallest Movie

You're about to see the movie that holds the Guinness World Records™ record for the World's Smallest Stop-Motion Film (see how it was made at http://youtu.be...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Self-powered nanoparticles instantly deliver healing drugs to bones

Self-powered nanoparticles instantly deliver healing drugs to bones | Chemistry | Scoop.it

A novel method for finding and delivering healing drugs to newly formed microcracks in bones has been invented by a team of chemists and bioengineers at Penn State University and Boston University. This research-microscope image shows the increasing density at the bone-crack site during a 40-minute test of particles carrying the bone-healing medication.

 

The method involves the targeted delivery of the drugs, directly to the cracks, on the backs of tiny self-powered nanoparticles. The energy that revs the motors of the nanoparticles and sends them rushing toward the crack comes from a surprising source — the crack itself.

 

“When a crack occurs in a bone, it disrupts the minerals in the bone, which leach out as charged particles — as ions — that create an electric field, which pulls the negatively charged nanoparticles toward the crack,” said Penn State Professor of Chemistry Ayusman Sen, a co-leader of the research team.

 

“Our experiments have shown that a biocompatible particle can quickly and naturally deliver an osteoporosis drug directly to a newly cracked bone.”

 

Sen said that the formation of this kind of an electric field is a well-known phenomenon, but other scientists previously had not used it as both a power source and a homing beacon to actively deliver bone-healing medications to the sites most at risk for fracture or active deterioration. “It is a novel way to detect cracks and deliver medicines to them,” said team co-leader and Boston University Professor Mark Grinstaff.

 

The method is more energetic and more targeted than current methods, in which medications ride passively on the circulating bloodstream, where they may or may not arrive at microcracks in a high-enough dosage to initiate healing.

 

The new method holds the promise of treating — as soon as they form — the microcracks that lead to broken bones in patients with osteoporosis and other medical conditions.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Nanosatellites are smartphone-sized spacecraft that can perform simple, yet very valuable space missions

Nanosatellites are smartphone-sized spacecraft that can perform simple, yet very valuable space missions | Chemistry | Scoop.it
The next generation of micro rockets could be built around a magnetic fluid that appears to defy gravity.

 

Nanosatellites borrow many of their components from terrestrial gadgets: miniaturized cameras, wireless radios and GPS receivers that have been perfected for hand-held devices are also perfect for spacecraft. However, according to Michigan Technological University's L. Brad King, there is at least one technology need that is unique to space: "Even the best smartphones don't have miniaturized rocket engines, so we need to develop them from scratch."

 

Miniature rockets aren't needed to launch a nanosatellite from Earth. The small vehicles can hitchhike with a regular rocket that is going that way anyway. But because they are hitchhikers, these nanosats don't always get dropped off in their preferred location. Once in space, a nanosatellite might need some type of propulsion to move it from its drop-off point into its desired orbit. This is where the micro rocket engine comes in.

 

For the last few years, researchers around the world have been trying to build such rockets using microscopic hollow needles to electrically spray thin jets of fluid, which push the spacecraft in the opposite direction. The fluid propellant is a special chemical known as an ionic liquid. A single thruster needle is finer than a human hair, less than one millimeter long and produces a thrust force equivalent to the weight of a few grains of sand. A few hundred of these needles fit in a postage-stamp-size package and produce enough thrust to maneuver a nanosatellite.

 

These new electrospray thrusters face some design challenges, however. "Because they are so small and intricate, they are expensive to make, and the needles are fragile," says King, the Ron and Elaine Starr Professor of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics. "They are easily destroyed either by a careless bump or an electrical arc when they're running."

 

To get around the problem, King and his team have developed an elegant strategy: eliminate the expensive and tedious microfabrication required to make the needles by letting Mother Nature take care of the assembly. "We're working with a unique type of liquid called a ferrofluid that naturally forms a stationary pattern of sharp tips in the liquid surface," he says. "Each tip in this self-assembling structure can spray a jet of fluid just like a micro-needle, so we don't actually have to make any needles."

 

Ferrofluids have been around since the 1960s. They are made of tiny magnetic particles suspended in a solvent that moves when magnetic force is applied. King illustrates with a tiny container holding a ferrofluid made of kerosene and iron dust. The fluid lies flat until he puts a magnet beneath it. Then suddenly, the liquid forms a regular series of peaks reminiscent of a mountain range or Bart Simpson's haircut. These peaks remain perfectly stable despite vigorous shaking and even turning the container upside down. It is, nonetheless, completely liquid, as a finger-tip touch proves undeniably. When the magnet is removed, the liquid relaxes to a perfectly flat surface.

 

King's team was trying to make an ionic liquid that behaved like a ferrofluid when they learned about a research team at the University of Sydney that was already making these substances. The Sydney team was using magnetic nanoparticles made by the life-sciences company Sirtex, which are used to treat liver cancer. "They sent us a sample, and we've used it to develop a thruster," King said. "Now we have a nice collaboration going. It's amazing that the same technology used to treat cancer can also function as a micro rocket for spacecraft."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

Nanoparticles stop mosquitoes breeding | Chemistry World

Nanoparticles stop mosquitoes breeding | Chemistry World | Chemistry | Scoop.it
Water-soluble carbon nanoparticles can prevent mosquito larvae from reaching maturity.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

Eco-friendly 'pre-fab nanoparticles' could revolutionize nano manufacturing - Space Daily

Eco-friendly 'pre-fab nanoparticles' could revolutionize nano manufacturing - Space Daily | Chemistry | Scoop.it
Eco-friendly 'pre-fab nanoparticles' could revolutionize nano manufacturing Space Daily A team of materials chemists, polymer scientists, device physicists and others at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have reported a breakthrough technique...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep

Brains Sweep Themselves Clean Of Toxins During Sleep | Chemistry | Scoop.it
Mouse brains get washed with cerebrospinal fluid while they sleep. Humans may use the same process.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

Molten air – a new class of battery | Chemistry World

Molten air – a new class of battery | Chemistry World | Chemistry | Scoop.it
New rechargeable batteries combine molten electrolytes, high capacity electron storage materials and oxygen from the air
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

iPad Science Fair - Class Tech Tips

iPad Science Fair - Class Tech Tips | Chemistry | Scoop.it

"If you’re looking for experiments for a school science fair or an easy way to access steps for an experiment, try DIY Nano HD. This free app focuses on an exploration of nanotechnologies, and the properties of atoms and molecules. It includes informational videos, easy to follow instructions and is great for all ages!"


Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

Dancing atoms in glass revealed for first time - NBCNews.com

Dancing atoms in glass revealed for first time - NBCNews.com | Chemistry | Scoop.it
Chemistry World
Dancing atoms in glass revealed for first time
NBCNews.com
The new images, described Oct. 10 in the journal Science, show that in small, localized regions, glass behaves like a crystal, with atoms aligned in an orderly matrix.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro from @The Convergence of ICT & Distributed Renewable Energy
Scoop.it!

Spray-on solar cells? New nanoparticles make solar cells cheaper to manufacture | ScienceDaily.com

Spray-on solar cells? New nanoparticles make solar cells cheaper to manufacture | ScienceDaily.com | Chemistry | Scoop.it

University of Alberta researchers have found that abundant materials in Earth's crust can be used to make inexpensive and easily manufactured nanoparticle-based solar cells.

 

The discovery, several years in the making, is an important step forward in making solar power more accessible to parts of the world that are off the traditional electricity grid or face high power costs, such as the Canadian North, said researcher Jillian Buriak, a chemistry professor and senior research officer of the National Institute for Nanotechnology based on the U of A campus.

 

Buriak and her team have designed nanoparticles that absorb light and conduct electricity from two very common elements: phosphorus and zinc. Both materials are more plentiful than scarce materials such as cadmium and are free from manufacturing restrictions imposed on lead-based nanoparticles.

 

"Half the world already lives off the grid, and with demand for electrical power expected to double by the year 2050, it is important that renewable energy sources like solar power are made more affordable by lowering the costs of manufacturing," Buriak said.

 

Her team's research supports a promising approach of making solar cells cheaply using mass manufacturing methods like roll-to-roll printing (as with newspaper presses) or spray-coating (similar to automotive painting). "Nanoparticle-based 'inks' could be used to literally paint or print solar cells or precise compositions," Buriak said.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Denise Weinhoeft-Renfro
Scoop.it!

Twitter / GeorgeTakei: Chemistry jokes. All the good ...

Twitter / GeorgeTakei: Chemistry jokes. All the good ... | Chemistry | Scoop.it
Chemistry jokes. All the good ones argon.
(Subm. by Paris Reilley) http://t.co/r8PTQ6HWXS
more...
No comment yet.