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A dollar badly spent: New facts on processed food in school lunches

A dollar badly spent: New facts on processed food in school lunches | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
Processed food is supposed to be cheaper for school systems; a recent investigation suggests otherwise.

Via Flora Moon
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Have Returning Students Seen a Real Change in School Lunches?

Have Returning Students Seen a Real Change in School Lunches? | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
Photo: USDA School nutrition changes, which are part of the newly enacted Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, bolster school nutrition programs by providing more meals to food insecure kids and by making those meals healthier and more nutrient dense.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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School Lunches and the Food Industry

School Lunches and the Food Industry | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
A cozy alliance between processed food makers and companies that serve school lunches is making students fat and sick.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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School lunch changes praised, but not universally embraced

School lunch changes praised, but not universally embraced | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
Schools are trying to answer a tough question: What can they serve that students will eat, while still meeting U.S. guidelines?In the school cafeteria these days, if you're trying to skate through the line without a fruit or a vegetable, watch out.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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Acting N.J. education chief reconsiders using school free-lunch programs to measure poverty

Acting N.J. education chief reconsiders using school free-lunch programs to measure poverty | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it

Recent analysis by the state auditor estimated that up to 37 percent of participants in the free and reduced-lunch program are fraudulently enrolled


Via Steven Engravalle
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Ten Big Ideas of School Leadership

Ten Big Ideas of School Leadership | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
Principal Mike McCarthy. Credit: Michael Warren



During my senior year of college, I taught math to 26 inmates, none of whom had finished high school.
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School Lunches: How The Food Industry Controls Student Meals

School Lunches: How The Food Industry Controls Student Meals | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
In a biting piece in The New York Times Sunday, investigative reporter Lucy Komisar offers an in-depth look at how the food industry -- and its complex web of internal alliances -- is taking over school meals.

Via Cathryn Wellner
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Hold the French Fries! School Lunch Just Got Healthier with USDA Ruling

Hold the French Fries! School Lunch Just Got Healthier with USDA Ruling | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
“Parents can now imagine their children coming home from school with a newfound love for spinach, sweet potatoes and whole-wheat spaghetti."...
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There's Homework to Do on School Lunches

There's Homework to Do on School Lunches | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it
New nutritional standards for meals in the nation's public schools are not going down well with many students. But sensible and consistent strategies at home and in school can win them over.

Via LPM: Health PR, LPM Comunicação SA
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Healthier School Lunches Face Student Rejection

Healthier School Lunches Face Student Rejection | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it

Students get more fruits and vegetables under new nutritional requirements for public school lunches, but many children just toss them away.
The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which required public schools to follow new nutritional guidelines this academic year to receive extra federal lunch aid, has created a nationwide version of the age-old parental challenge: persuading children to eat what is good for them.
According to the new restrictions, high school lunches must be no more than 850 calories, middle school lunches no more than 700 calories and elementary school lunches no more than 650. Before, there were no maximums.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
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Jenny Sloane's curator insight, December 5, 2013 8:54 PM

Revolutionizing school lunches is clearly a very difficult task. Students are used to eating comfort foods like pizza, fries, chicken tenders, and nachos. It is unrealistic to think that any child would willingly want to give up those delicious foods that they are so used to eating for healthy meals, like sandwiches and green beans. Change is always challanging. However, I believe if schools stick with adopting new, healthy meals younger students will not have the same problem because they will only grow up eating the healthier foods. Therefore, they will never know what they are missing out on and be healthier along the way. With that being said, the transition period will be the most difficult. I am not surprised that this article is about high school kids who went on a strike because they wanted their old meals back. Before reading this article, I had no idea that there are not set calorie restrictions on school lunches. Although I am all for healthier school lunches, there are a couple of arguments made in this article that I do agree with. First of all, high school students are often very active. I personally played a sport every season all four years of high school. That meant practicing every day after school for two hours. If we had lunch at 12:30 and then practice from 4:30-6:30 I would not get home and eat dinner until about 7:15. That is a very long time for any growing teenager to go without eating a solid meal. Therefore, I agree with the fact that many teens do need a lot of food throughout the day that may often exceed the calorie limit. Furthermore, there is no question that most of the time, healthier food options are more expensive. This is also a huge problem for many students and families who simply do not have the resources to afford whatever food they want. I know I am very fortunate and my parents could always provide for me. I also agree that as long as children are still given an option of what they can eat for lunch, they will be unlikely to go for the healthier choice. 

Karla Luetzow's curator insight, December 19, 2013 7:57 PM

 

This news article from the New York Times reflects on the recent protests from high school students against the new school lunches. Rising in price from $2.50 to $2.60, it seems like this ten percent increase would not cause this much commotion. However, it is more about the amount of food and quality of food in each lunch. Due to the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2011, an 850 calorie cut off per meal was mandated to all high school lunches. Therefore, as price increased, the portions decreased. All over the country high school students have protested this new lunch claiming that vegetables are “gross.” Researchers in this article claim it will just take time for the students to adjust.

 

Insight:

 

While reading this article, I thought the high school students sounded like snobby, unhealthy, and unrealistic. A quote that especially raveled my bones was by a high schooler who stated,” “Now there’s no taste, no flavor and it’s healthy, which makes it taste even worse.” It bothers me that “healthy” food is considered gross. There are so many healthy, delicious options out there that I believe that this student is being very narrow-minded. To me, it seems more like quote by a seven year old than by a high school senior.

However, after my initial reaction, I remembered saying the same things about my high school cafeteria food. I saw my high school go through a similar shift a few years ago. Pizza and fries were replaced with salads and apples. I have always enjoyed fruits and vegetables. A lot of the time I will choose a yummy, wholesome salad over a greasy pizza. However, this was not the case in my own high school cafeteria. It is pretty difficult to mess up pizza and fries. However, vegetables loaded in grease and cooked down to mush can get disgusting pretty fast. Therefore, I have the preconceived idea that high school cafeterias try to make healthy food but ultimately fail by loading it in grease. The same can be said about the University of Maryland’s dining services. Most of the value meals are cooked in so much grease that the vegetables do not really add nutritional value. 

I really love the idea of adding healthier options. However, the portion size must be able to satisfy the student body. The United States should look at European schools for inspiration. In most European countries, schools must cycle lunches every ten to twenty days. They also are now allowing student and even parent test-tasting before a meal gets approved for a school lunch. With the community working together, I believe this school protests can end and healthier food can be a realistic, yummy, and satisfying option in public high schools.

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Missouri Republican candidate calls to halt federal school lunch program

Missouri Republican candidate calls to halt federal school lunch program | chases2020 action research | Scoop.it

Sen. Claire McCaskill’s (D-MO) Republican opponent says that the federal government should stop helping to feed needy children with the school lunch program.


Via Bret
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