Changes to the immediate environment as a result of meeting needs and wants
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Needs and Wants Activity

Needs and Wants Activity | Changes to the immediate environment as a result of meeting needs and wants | Scoop.it
Generate a thoughtful discussion about needs, wants, and values by downloading the Center's Needs and Wants activity
Nicole Fagan's insight:

This website provides a great introduction for students to the idea of Needs and Wants through its Needs and Wants teaching resource.

The first activity involves dividing cards of images (e.g. shoes, cars, food, candy) into things that are needed to live and things that are not required to live but would be nice to have. The activity is instructed to be done in pairs but could be done as a class or in small groups which may make it more manageable for Stage 1 students. The activity is very beneficial as it is a practical activity, allowing the students to think about needs and wants in regards to their own lives and own experiences.

 

The EcoLiteracy Site has a strong sustainable living theme which applies to the syllabus outcome and subject matter dot point of the relationship between environments and people as well as the impact of humans on the environment as a result of meeting needs and wants (Board of Studies, 2007, pp. 48-49).

 

Following on from the first activity, the cards can be divided again into categories of things that are usually thrown away or wasted and things that are not normally wasted. This brings the idea of waste and sustainability in a way that young students can understand and relate to.

 

The second part of the activity is a great way to continue to develop sustainability education in the H.S.I.E curriculum at a level that is understandable to Stage 1 students by making students equipped “…to act, individually and collectively, in ways that can contribute to sustainability” through awareness of their own use and waste of resources which is something they can understand and apply in their own lives (Australian Government; Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2010, p.4).

 

Reference List:

 

Australian Government Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. (2010). Sustainability curriculum framework; a guide for curriculum developers and policy makers. Retrieved April 6, 2014, from Australian Government; department of the environment: http://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/resources/9b2e74ca-c909-4d57-bae3-c515c20957de/files/curriculum-framework.pdf

 

Board of Studies. (2007). Human society and its environment K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

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My place, your place | Global Education

My place, your place | Global Education | Changes to the immediate environment as a result of meeting needs and wants | Scoop.it
Nicole Fagan's insight:

The Global Education website, and particularly the My Place, Your Place teaching activity, looks at shelter as a need by looking at housing from both a local and global perspective.

 

This site provides a great explanation of why Global Education is important and why teachers and students should integrate a global perspective in the curriculum. It defines and emphasises globalisation, diversity, social justice, conflict resolution and sustainability. This website contains many resources and activities for teachers to use in order to help them to teach their students to become “responsible global and local citizens” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 37).

 

The five My Place, Your Place activities cover a variety of syllabus outcomes and content from multiple subjects and applies directly to the H.S.I.E syllabus through its global perspective and development of an understanding of the natural and built environment in both the local and global area, the relationship between people and the environment and shelter as a need.

 

Activity one encourages students to look at their own homes through brainstorming, discussion and drawing. The second activity builds on this knowledge by expanding student’s understandings of homes to the local area through exploration. It also utilises technology through photography. Activities three and four bring the global perspective to the students through use of images of different houses around the world. This allows young students to understand the difference in housing around the world through visual images and modeling. Activity five brings the four previous activities together so that the students are able to understand the concept of housing as a need.

 

The activities on this website are a great resource for teachers when planning lessons. The ideas provided include a large variety of approaches to learning including inquiry, discussion, use of technology and craft, imagination and collaboration. All activities or lesson ideas also contain extension activities which would be a great resource for teachers to use if they have extra time or want to broaden and enhance students understanding of a particular idea.

 

Reference List:

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching humanities and social sciences. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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The Lorax activities at Seussville

The Lorax activities at Seussville | Changes to the immediate environment as a result of meeting needs and wants | Scoop.it
Official site of Dr. Seuss and the Cat in the Hat featuring games, printable activities, the complete illustrated character guide, information about creator Theodor Geisel and his books for kids, parent and teacher resources, and a photo gallery of his artwork.
Nicole Fagan's insight:

This resource is meant to be used in conjunction with the picture book The Lorax by Dr. Seuss (Seuss, 1971). Of particular emphasis in this resource are ‘The Lorax Project’ and the educator’s resources.

 

The Lorax is a children’s book about the environment. The boy in the story visits a town, which is very run-down. The character of the Once-ler tells about how the town was originally full of trees and animals until he cut down the trees to make items such as shirts, socks and hats. When the Once-ler cut down the trees, the Lorax spoke on behalf of the trees to warn the Once-ler of the consequences of doing so. The Once-ler ignored the warnings and instead set up a factory to cut down the tress, which resulted in pollution. When all of the trees had been cut down, the factory shut down. The Once-ler gives the boy in the story the last seed which can be used to plant a tree and bring back all of the animals.

 

This book relates to the syllabus outcome and subject matter dot point by teaching students about changes to the environment as a result of the relationship between environments and people.  

The Lorax has also been made into a film in 2012, which could be used to enhance student engagement and learning.

 

Some of the educator’s resources available for teachers include environmentally friendly ideas for the school and local environment as well as discussion questions for the classroom.

 

The Lorax Project is a resource for students. It is an interactive website including games and activities and information about the environment. It also includes practical ideas and advice for protecting the natural environment, which could be understood by Stage 1 students.

 

Reference List:

 

Seuss, T. (1971). The Lorax. New York: Random House.

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Gibberagong Environmental Education Centre

Gibberagong Environmental Education Centre | Changes to the immediate environment as a result of meeting needs and wants | Scoop.it
Gibberagong Environmental Education Centre
Nicole Fagan's insight:

The Gibberagong Environmental Education Center website contains information and a number of resources for H.S.I.E from K-12. It would be of particular use for schools located in the Ku-ring-gai area to cover the syllabus outcome, which is to “compare and contrast natural and built features in the local area…” (Board of Studies, 2007, p.48).

 

Of particular use to this subject matter dot point, is the Stage 1 excursion “The Need for Shelter”. This excursion involves a guided bush walk with students identifying different types of natural and man made shelters for animals and people, including Aboriginal shelters. It links directly to the H.S.I.S curriculum by covering both the ENS1.5 and ENS 1.6 Outcomes (Board of Studies, 2007, p. 48). This excursion also integrates outcomes from other areas of the NSW Curriculum by covering ST1-10LW and ST1-11LW from the Science and Technology Curriculum (Board of Studies, 2014).

 

The website contains useful information on this excursion, as well as other information, resources and links for students and teachers.

 

One such resource is a link to the WilderQuest program. This is a computer game developed by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service and would be of particular use for students. It allows students to develop an understanding of the natural Australian environment whilst in the classroom through an interactive means, and uses a video game format, which is of interest to students today.

 

Other resources which the Gibberagong website has includes two Teacher resources which contain an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspective. These are Gibberagong Aboriginal Studies  - Teacher Resource Book and My People – Teacher Reference Book on Aboriginal People of Northern Sydney and are found under Teaching Resources > Aboriginal Education. They provide information including how to integrate an Aboriginal Perspective across the Key Learning Areas as well as information on the Guringai, which is the Indigenous country and people of the Sydney Ku-ring-gai region. Both sources reinforce the “diversity and complexity of Aboriginal life” with factual information provided without stereotypes as well as acknowledging the limitations of previous Indigenous Sources being written entirely by white people from a white perspective (NSW Department of Education and Communities, 2002, pp. 15-16).

 

Reference List:

 

Board of Studies. (2007). Human society and its environment K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies. (2014). Science K–10; stage 1, knowledge and understanding, natural environement. Retrieved April 6, 2014, from Board of Studies NSW: http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/science/science-k10/content/958/

 

NSW Department of Education and Communities. (2002). Aboriginal education K-12; resource guide. Retrieved March 28, 2014, from Curriculum support: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

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My Place activities for the classroom

My Place activities for the classroom | Changes to the immediate environment as a result of meeting needs and wants | Scoop.it
Nicole Fagan's insight:

This resource is to be used with the picture book My Place by Nadia Wheatley and illustrated by Donna Rawlins (Wheatley & Rawlins, 1988). The picture book My Place is a great resource to use for teaching these syllabus outcomes and subject matter dot point in H.S.I.E for Stage 1 students.

 

The book tells the story of children who have lived on the same piece of land in Sydney from 1788 until 1988. Each child in the story depicts 10 years of time and shows aspects of the area including homes, families and customs.  The story teaches history, cultural diversity and multiculturalism including having an indigenous perspective by looking back at the changes to the environment of the particular area.  When using this book for Stage 1, teachers may want to cover 1 page at a time as the book introduces 20 main characters which may be confusing for Year 1 and 2 students.

 

The book has also been made into a children’s television series, which could also be used to enhance student learning.

 

Using the book as well as the activity ideas in this Internet resource could be a very effective way of engaging year 1 and year 2 students when learning about changes to the environment as a result of human interaction.   

 

Particular aspects of the resource that could be used to teach this H.S.I.E subject matter dot point include the activities that focus on identifying aspects that change and stay the same, activities using your local area and all the activities involving Aboriginal people and perspectives. Using more of the activities in the resource will allow you to integrate concepts and outcomes from other parts of the syllabus in your teaching.

 

Reference List:

 

Wheatley, N., & Rawlins, D. (1988). My Place. North Blackburn: Harper Collins.

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