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The best, "non-partisan" change resources treasures on the planet.   For the BEST of the BEST curated news  SUBSCRIBE to our monthly newsletter via  Reveln.com/Tools/ (We never SPAM!)
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Shock of the New - 2014 Resistance Timeline

Shock of the New - 2014 Resistance Timeline | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This humorous timeline gives perspective and meaning to the shock of change, with a nod to Alvin Toffler, author of the classic Future Shock.   


The quote shared is also meaningful, in the context of looking at your own adapt-to-change abilities and those of your peers:
"Every man is a creature of the age in which he lives, and few are able to raise themselves above the ideas of the time." - Voltaire


Related posts & tools by Deb:





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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 1, 2014 12:33 AM

This quote applies:    "Every man is a creature of the age in which he lives, and few are able to raise themselves above the ideas of the time." - Voltaire

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Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes

Why We're So Afraid of Change ~ What Holds Businesses Back - Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Embracing change requires you yourself to experience the changes you’re asking your organization to undergo."


Our client is now desperately hoping his division’s leaders will embrace change, maybe even a Blue Ocean Strategy. They’ve reached a dangerous tipping point that could risk the future of their business.


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To ignite change, you need to do it yourself first.
____________________ 


...if you truly want to see, feel and think in new ways, you have to fight your brain’s desire to stay put.


To ignite change, you need to do it yourself first. You need to recognize that new ideas come from trying new solutions in your own head and changing your brain’s focus. Then you can rollout the rest of the plan to your company.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Any Blue Ocean change practitioners out there who wish to comment on their client experience of "do it yourself first?"  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, April 10, 2013 8:04 AM

In 2009, Steve McKee published “When Growth Stalls” in which he notes that 41.2% of nearly 5,700 companies he studied stalled in the previous decade. The number of reasons why are staggering, namely: a failure to focus, no competitive point of difference, and weak brand images and identities, to name just a few.

Given this reality, we can turn to science to explain why businesses stagnate. Growing research from the neurosciences and cognitive sciences reveal that change really is difficult for humans. Resistance comes from three forces:

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT

Improvisation May Be the Key to Successfully Managing Change, MIT | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Key attributes for almost any organization, and SO CHALLENGING to implement: agility , flexibility, improvisation – a company’s ability to quickly change is crucial to its long-term success."


 MIT's Leadership Center weighs in via an article by professor Wanda J. Orlikowski that equates a successful company to an orchestra.   Yes, I've heard this before.  Benjamin Zander is quite compelling in his leadership videos on this very note, pun intended.


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...to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment
_______________________________


What is helpful in the article is yet another example of "letting go" as in, "sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead."  Well now, MIT, yes.  And Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much.  Releasing "some control" as quoted below, is the magic sauce, in my opinion, and adding in some feedback and perspective, on lessons learned, is a part of it.


_______________________________


"sometimes, however, the conductor needs to let go and let its skilled and creative musicians lead." Yes, Orpheus, the conductor-less orchestra, has taught us as much. ~ Deb


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It is always, helpful, however to review suggestions for how to create and sustain an agile, flexible, improvisational culture.  


Here are Orlikowski's tips for creating such an organization, excerpted:


  • Plan to improvise - sometimes you can anticipate change, and if you can do that, you should plan to address that change in a flexible way
  • Adapt when you cannot foresee – as business rules are changing, adapt and test on a smaller, departmental scale before making company-wide changes
  • Create a learning environment – encourage communication between your employees in different locations and departments, push everyone to learn from each other
  • Encourage flexibility – to allow for improvisation, CEOs need to release some control and allow employees to experiment
  • Improvise today for success tomorrow – create a culture of experimentation and improvisation even when you’re not experiencing extreme change in practice for when you do need to change



A companion article and video to this one is how Asst. Professor Steve Leybourne, Boston University experiences improv connected with the finance industry, creating a model and citing risk, reward in managers who surreptitiously improvise.   In his video, you'll see evidence of the "let go of micromanaging" and still how it is tentative in corporate culture.  It seems we have a long way to go to let go, but writing about those who research it is a start.  


  • Source:  http://www.scoop.it/t/innovation-institutions-will-it-blend/p/1715217458/moving-beyond-surreptitious-manager-improv-risk-reward-emerging-best-practice-in-your-org-steve-leybourne


What is your experience with creating a culture that is agile , flexible, and especially improvisational?



Photo credit:   ePi.Longo  Article source:  Chief Executive Magazine

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Smart Risk, Without HandCuffs to Free Your Innovation Culture

Smart Risk, Without HandCuffs to Free Your Innovation Culture | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it
To foster an environment of smart risk-taking, leaders should use guardrails, not handcuffs.


Examples from the list of 7 strategies for defining guardrails:
   

1. Define smart vs. stupid risks. Every leader’s level of risk tolerance varies, but some amount of risk is essential to innovation. 


3. Encourage experimentation. ...give the go-ahead for “managed experimentation” ...resource boundaries...and have the small team that’s in charge share the results of the experimentation phase with a larger team upon completion.

7. Celebrate smart risk-taking. The Tata Group, a global conglomerate, hosts an annual “Dare to Try” awards, which celebrates the idea that failures often lead to groundbreaking innovations. This type of public acknowledgement that every big bet won’t pay off fuels a spirit of smart risk-taking among its employees.


Within your own organization, you can use the company’s intranet, e-letters, and Twitter account to showcase individuals who take smart risks. By identifying them, you publicly reward the person/team and provide a company-wide reference point for acceptable risk-taking. 


Related posts & tools by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Useful pointers & examples from the Booz&Co. bloggers on how to define the guardrails vs. manager bottlenecks and handcuffs.  To see a future without managers at all, check out:   

Zappos says Goodbye to Bosses & Bureaucracy - Hello to Holacracy

~  D

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Pascal Vedel's curator insight, January 7, 2014 3:38 AM

A very good paper on how to encourage "adequate" risk taking in an organization

Un très bon billet sur les moyens d'encourager la prise de risque "pertinents" au sein d'une collectivité

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Love change, Pivot through. Quotes on Innovation.

Love change, Pivot through.  Quotes on Innovation. | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

"Gail talks with author Eric Ries about innovation, specifically around when it’s time to pivot and how fast you have to decide.”


Blog post author Gail Severini recently had an insightful conversation with author Eric Ries about innovation, specifically around when it’s time to pivot and how fast you have to decide.”

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“The problem is that vision, product, and strategy came to us all together in a flash.”

_______________________


Gail says:


Don’t underestimate Eric Ries. Don’t say (like I did), “He looks so young. What could he know?”
   
Excerpts:

“A pivot is a change in strategy without a change in vision…it is not giving up on the vision … it is not a change in the product.


We change the product all the time.”


“The problem is that vision, product, and strategy came to us all together in a flash.”


“The reason it is so painful to pivot is because it requires us to give up some elements of what we thought we would be doing…”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Get agile with that strategy:  I've seen a number of change processes that help organizations successfully flip in critical moments of truth.  Gail's pivot question focuses on a finer points of strategic agility, adapting strategy to fully accomplish your vision in an ever changing environment. ~  Deb

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Why Innovation Dies, Dealing with Disruption, not placing Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes

Why Innovation Dies, Dealing with Disruption, not  placing Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes | Change Management Resources | Scoop.it

Here's the companion post to the previous article that features the long & winding road in dealing with online education, and confronts disruption head-on.


Excerpted:


Lessons Learned

  • Innovation in New Markets do not come from “overarching strategies”
  • It comes out of opportunity, chaos and rapid experimentation
  • Solutions are found by betting on a portfolio of low-cost experiments
  • The road for innovation does not go through committee


One useful purpose a university committee could have had was figuring out what the goal of going online was. [The example in the article is education based.]


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...it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.
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...the path to implementing online education is not known. In fact, it’s not a solvable problem by committee, regardless of how many smart people in the room. It is a “NP complete” problem – it is so complex that figuring out the one possible path to a correct solution is computationally incalculable.


By: Steve Blank, author, teacher of entrepreneurship and consultant who has reshaped how startups are created. He is coauthor of the recently published, The Startup Owner’s Manual (K&S Ranch, 2012).


Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/groupthink/2012/05/01/why-innovation-dies/2/

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