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4 Leader Behaviors explain 89%  of strong leadership

4 Leader Behaviors explain 89%  of strong leadership | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

From the 3rd Results Oriented principle, Leader behaviors – McKinsey research helps us know what works best today. From the article: 

5 Strategies to Lead Change, Using Liberating Structures



Five key concepts and supporting research and tools will help you lead through adaptive change in a VUCA world, one that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous, as presented in Mexico City for CPA firm leaders at the Russell Bedford International conference, yet applicable for any leader.

 

 



Researchers showed that out of 20 distinct leadership traits identified in organizations whose leadership performance was strong, high-quality leadership teams typically displayed 4 of the 20 possible types of behavior.  These 4 behaviors explained 89 percent of the variance between strong and weak organizations in terms of leadership effectiveness

1. Solving problems effectively.

2. Operating with a strong results orientation.

3. Seeking different perspectives.

4. Supporting others.

This is from the McKinsey Quarterly, first published in 1964, which now offers the perspective today that “much of the management intuition that has served us in the past will become irrelevant,” (Dobbs, 2014.) McKinsey forecasts a crash of:

1) technological disruption,

2) rapid emerging-markets growth, and

3) widespread aging as “long-held assumptions [give] way, and seemingly powerful business models [become] upended.”

Sound familiar? Are you ready? 

Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

* 5 Strategies to Lead Change Using Liberating Structures

* Agile Leader Learning for Sustainable Change: Steps through Sharp Rocks

 * Two Tried & True Change Models – Evergreen for Agile Change

 * Creator, Challenger, Coach through Change: Getting out of the Drama

 Find them all here: https://reveln.com/blog/

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Does it Pay to Be a Jerk? - Updating Nice Guys Finish Last

Does it Pay to Be a Jerk? - Updating Nice Guys Finish Last | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

New research confirms what they say about nice guys...[or at least the result is a lot more nuanced that it seems.


________________________

   

Givers dominate not only the top of the success ladder but the bottom, too, precisely because they risk exploitation by takers.

________________________


Excerpted:

We have some well-worn aphorisms…courtesy of Machiavelli (“It is far better to be feared than loved”), Dale Carnegie (“Begin with praise and honest appreciation”), and Leo Durocher (who may or may not have actually said “Nice guys finish last”). More recently, books like The Power of Nice and The Upside of Your Dark Side have continued in the same vein: long on certainty, short on proof.

     

So it was a breath of fresh air when, in 2013, there appeared a book that brought data into the debate. The author, Adam Grant, is a 33-year-old Wharton professor, and his best-selling book, Give and Take: Why Helping Others Drives Our Success, offers evidence that “givers”—people who share their time, contacts, or know-how without expectation of payback—dominate the top of their fields. “This pattern holds up across the board,” Grant wrote—from engineers in California to salespeople in North Carolina to medical students in Belgium. …[T]he book appears to have swung the tide of business opinion toward the happier, nice-guys-finish-first scenario.

   

And yet suspicions …remain—fueled, in part, by …Steve Jobs, by Walter Isaacson.  …Since Steve Jobs was published in 2011, “I think I’ve had 10 conversations where CEOs have looked at me and said, ‘Don’t you think I should be more of an asshole?’” says Robert Sutton, a professor of management at Stanford, whose book, The No Asshole Rule, nonetheless includes a chapter titled “The Virtues of Assholes.”

    

In Grant’s framework, the mentor in this story would be classified as a “taker,” which brings us to a major complexity in his findings. Givers dominate not only the top of the success ladder but the bottom, too, precisely because they risk exploitation by takers. It’s a nuance that’s often lost in the book’s popular rendering.

   

…[M]anagement professor Donald Hambrick, of Penn State [knows] academic psychology’s definition of narcissism—a trait Hambrick measured in CEOs and then plotted against the performance of their companies, in a 2007 study with Arijit Chatterjee.

…Hambrick…chose a set of indirect measures: the prominence of each CEO’s picture in the company’s annual report; the size of the CEO’s paycheck compared with that of the next-highest-paid person in the company; the frequency with which the CEO’s name appeared in company press releases. Lastly, he looked at the CEO’s use of pronouns in press interviews, comparing the frequency of the first-person plural with that of the first-person singular. Then he rolled all the results into a single narcissism indicator.
 

How did the narcissists fare? Hambrick …ound that the narcissists were like Grant’s givers: they clustered near both extremes of the success spectrum.

Related posts by Deb:
      

              

        

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The humility and selflessness of Collin's Level 5 leadership, as well as Professor Adam Grant's important work on Givers, Takers and Matchers shows a nuance about timing and intensity.  It seems giving can include a goodly portion of challenge and dominance, among the expectation of the group surveyed.   Collins describes Level 5 leaders as those in whom genuine personal humility blends with intense professional will.  Perhaps intensity is a key description for those leaders.  


NOTE that:

..."In at least three situations, a touch of jerkiness can be helpful.

1) ...if your job, or [an] element of it, involves a series of onetime encounters in which reputational blowback has minimal effect.
    

2) The second is in that evanescent moment [when] group has formed but its hierarchy has not.


Finally

[3 The third—not fully explored here, but worth mentioning—is when the group’s survival is in question, speed is essential, and a paralyzing existential doubt is in the air."  


(Numbering added by Deb)   

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Kudos's curator insight, July 21, 2015 11:56 AM

This is a really good article. I am not sure what does work best. But you are who you are. You are a jerk or you are a nice guy or girl but you can learn the competencies that will make you and your company successful if you tend to have nicer tendencies.

 

What I took away at the end of the article is you need these qualities to be a great leader:

Confidence
Competence
Expertise
Initiative
Passion
Vision

 

If you want people to follow you - you need to show people you care about success. People want to follow a winner.

 

You do not need to be a Jerk or Narcissist to get results but you need to be tough, direct and challenge people when it is appropriate to get results. Then appreciate them and give them Kudos when they do well. You then will develop shared behaviours that will make the whole company successful. Disagreeable Givers is a great term and worth striving for.

 

My favourite part was the Steve Jobs argument. He was a jerk and a narcissist and built a great company we all admire. But his Jerk tendencies got him fired and it was his kinder gentler self after he reflected on things in his exile that lead to his ultimate success on his return. He was a better leader when he came back. A little less of a total jerk and he actually did praise when appropriate and gave credit where credit was due. But he still pushed people relentlessly and they respected him for that because of the spill over effect. By him doing well, the whole team and company did well. He had the above qualities.

 

If he was the only one that did well - seeking money, prestige and acclaim - he would have been exiled again and the Apple would have failed. Hard to even imagine. But the question you have to ask - was his jerk behaviour the reason for the success or was Appel and Jobs successful despite his narcissistic tendencies? Hmmmm?

 

There are wartime CEO's and Peace time CEO's and they need to act differently to be successful based on the circumstances. Steve jobs was a very good wartime CEO.

 

But follow the rules of engagement and you will be successful all the time.

 

 

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Content Curation at Work: Startupery - A Library of Startup Best-Practices Curated by True Subject Matter Experts

Content Curation at Work: Startupery - A Library of Startup Best-Practices Curated by True Subject Matter Experts | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Take start-ups & entrepreneurs, add content curation by SMEs, subject matter experts, viola!  It's a handy resource worth a good look to support entrepreneurs and the growth of their companies.  ~  D

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Robin Good's curator insight, July 12, 2014 9:34 AM



Startupery is a new online resource which organizes and curates best-practices, strategy advice, tips and methods for business startups.


The present library currently comprises over 500 hundred resources organized under 372 topics by 12 selected "experts", which include, among others, Fred Wilson (Vevnture Capitalist), Eric Ries (The Lean Startup), Chris Dixon (Investor) and Brad Feld (Early Stage Investor / Entrepreneur). 


For each expert you will find a page outlining his profile and presenting, in a categorized fashion, a selected number of sources suggested by him.


"For years, and now more than ever, startup founders, investors and operators have been sharing advice on how to succeed in business. From personal blogs to up-and-coming publications, this advice has been scattered and often hard to find when you need it mostStartup{ery is a library for this advice, giving each resource and the important topics that they cover a home on the internet."


An excellent and well-organized resource hub for startups, Simple, easy to navigate and staffed by a highly reputable set of subject-matter-experts / curators.

A great example of the value that content curation can bring to just about any field, where there is lot of precious information scattered around and which can greatly benefit from competent and trusted "organizers". 


Free to use.



Startupery: http://startupery.com/ 


Added to Content Curation Examples board.





Pierre Dejean's curator insight, July 12, 2014 10:16 AM

Great content about Start-up ! 

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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly article.


After the tragic events of 9/11, a team of Harvard psychologists quietly “invaded” the US intelligence system. The team, led by Richard Hackman, wanted to determine what makes intelligence units effective. By surveying, interviewing, and observing hundreds of analysts across 64 different intelligence groups, the researchers ranked those units from best to worst.



[They discovered], after parsing the data, that the most important factor wasn’t on their list.


The single strongest predictor of group effectiveness was the amount of help that analysts gave to each other.


Evidence from studies led by Indiana University’s Philip Podsakoff demonstrates that the frequency with which employees help one another predicts

  • sales revenues in pharmaceutical units and retail stores;
  • profits, costs, and customer service in banks;
  • creativity in consulting and engineering firms;
  • productivity in paper mills;
  • and revenues, operating efficiency, customer satisfaction, and performance quality in restaurants.


See the related post by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a brilliant work by Adam Grant that may be part of the answer to the fragile nature of systems in organizations.  

Givers, Matchers (predominate in most organizations, think "silos") and Takers are key terms to understand why some cultures are high performance and others struggle just to be average.  Takers may also describe those leaders and cultures that eventually become a casuality of the normal organizational decline.  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, June 13, 2013 4:40 PM

When it comes to giver cultures, the role-modeling lesson here is a powerful one: if you want it, go and give it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 13, 2013 5:10 PM
Thanks John! So evidently true. Now if we can only fully implement it!
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New Approaches on the Fed Fast Track: Did Charles Evans Save the Recovery?

New Approaches on the Fed Fast Track: Did Charles Evans Save the Recovery? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Chicago Fed president Charles Evans has gone from dissenter to intellectual leader in just a year. The future of the recovery might be at stake
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

When a post features statements like this, " just a year later, the Fed has fully embraced the so-called Evans rule by linking interest rates to the unemployment rate." - it's time to take notice of what captured minds, as well as hearts and the hands on the wheel of interest rates change."  ~  D

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Intuit's Scott Cook on Failed Global Expansion: 'We Should've Known Better' [VIDEO]

Intuit's Scott Cook on Failed Global Expansion: 'We Should've Known Better' [VIDEO] | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Intuit founder Scott Cook and what went wrong the first time they rolled out the company's Quicken tax prep software worldwide.


It would see cultural due diligence was the lesson learned here.  

______________________________

   

We can launch,  ....but then the sales slowed way down.  

______________________________ 

   

Yes, it seems it was a ethnocentric blind spot.  Paraphrased:  ONLY in the US did we studying the customer & give them exactly what they wanted.  We didn't do that overseas.  

    

Excerpted:

   

We'd get meetings of our global teams together…  We could launch, could get the press, we could fill the channel, we'd get initial evidence.

   

But then the sales slowed way down.   

   

Visiting the Japanese:  150 people crammed into the biggest room we had.   Strategy, plan, dream.  He asked for questions.  In Japan, they don't ask questions of the big guy.  Silence.

   

One engineer, finally, cautiously raised his hand:  Why does our product for Japan look just like an American product?  It was built for Americans, not Japanese.   …And he was right.  Ultimately the root cause problem was too hard to overcome.

   

The root cause was baked into our early decision.   …We build them based on what we knew in the U.S.

   

See the full video here.

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5 Factors and Tools to Predict Change Success, AKA Adoption of Your Business Initiative – VinJones

5 Factors and Tools to Predict Change Success, AKA Adoption of Your Business Initiative – VinJones | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
The excerpted post below is part of a two part series that offers change and innovation adoption rate tools.


What I like about Kevin's 2-part series is that it is not about the unconvincing ROI, return on investment metric. It is about the powerful effect of stories, examples and case studies that inspire and "spark ...imagination.


His first post focuses on the five (5) factors to use to predict the rate of adoption. The second post offers tools and templates to give you an adoption rate measurement.

___________________________


Contrary to popular belief, an ROI will not convince them. ...it is stories and examples and case studies which spark their imagination. ~ Kevin Jones, vinJones.com

___________________________


Also keep in mind that change and innovation are quite different from each other. This is particularly highlighted in our two curation streams: Innovation in Institutions, Will it Blend? and the one you are reading, Change Leadership Watch.


We are also highlighting Kevin's tools on CMRsite.com, a non-partisan change management resources site.


Excerpts:


The Adoption Index
One of my favorite books is Diffusion of Innovations by Everett M. Rogers. Although this largely academic book was originally written in 1962, it hasn’t lost any of its usefulness. It explains why innovations and technologies are adopted, or not, and at what rate.


1)“Relative advantage is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as better than the idea it supersedes."


The degree of relative advantage may be measured in economic terms, but social prestige factors, convenience, and satisfaction are also important factors.”


2)“Compatibility is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as being consistent with the existing values, past experiences, and needs of potential adopters.


3)“Complexity is the degree to which an innovation is perceived as difficult to understand and use.”


Read the full post for all five factors and the link to part 2 of the series that offers adoption rate tools.



via vinjones.com

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How Change Management and Emotional Change Curve Models Help Your Project

How Change Management and Emotional Change Curve Models Help Your Project | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

The blog author list six fundamental change management models and suggests that project managers start by finding out what model is used within your organizations now.


He also suggests SARA: Shock, Anger, Rejection and Acceptance - from Kubler Ross, tied to an adapted Emotional Change Curve model.

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Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year

Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It takes courage to listen. Whether it’s a first or fifth transition to a new leader role, these non-profit leadership lessons learned are timeless. Pause, reflect. choose, (from horse-guided leadership & learning.) In the first months, resist the urgent and not important to follow these practical steps to ensure your success.  

______________________
It takes courage to listen & learn, as a new leader.
_______________________

 

What I learned at the University of Michigan early on was the power of the conversation. Listening builds relationship. Listening well has impact as a leader with groups of new direct reports, with peers and colleagues, ALL of them await a new leader’s first steps and actions. Each. Encounter. Equals. Opportunity. To. Connect.

John Taylor, CEO of the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) had this to say about the series:
 

“As a new CEO, the article’s main points to invest time in learning, building relationships, and establishing priorities have been key during my first six months on the job.”  
 

I interviewed John before he left his role at the University of Michigan. His view is a fresh insight to help this year's new leaders.  Note that although we make reference to associations throughout the posts, these tips apply to any non-profit organization and are adaptable to the for-profit sector as well.

EXCERPTS from the full article derived from
  -- "Seven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job"

1. LISTEN to Learn

In many high-pressure environments, deep listening distinguishes the highly experienced from the amateurs. ...One association executive advised his peers to “resist the temptation to prove how bright you are; do nothing when you first arrive—just learn.”
   

...Develop a list for listening interviews including staff, board members, active volunteers, randomly selected members, dropped members, industry leaders, subject matter experts, external partners, and others. Everyone has something to say; they ...will be encouraged by your desire to learn. Ask open-ended questions. Prepare to be surprised. Though many relationships will deepen during your tenure, early conversations can provide unique opportunities for candid exchanges unencumbered by baggage, fears, or agendas.

 

2. COMMUNICATE!

...Information for your staff is usually under-communicated by a factor of four.
 

Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Staff members are vitally interested in what the boss [senior leadership team, executive committee, board] just talked about. Find a way to share it regularly.

    

  • The board should be vitally interested in progress toward strategic goals. Find a way to check on this.
   
  • Committees and other volunteer groups don’t know what other committees and groups are doing. Summarize, align, and share.
   
  • Members and constituents want to know “What’s in it for me?”  They will appreciate understanding the logic behind board decisions. Find a way to test, confirm and communicate this regularly. 
Read the full post on LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/courage-new-leaders-listen-learn-year-deb-nystrom 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article is useful for any non-profit leader in interim roles, as well as new leadership roles.  It's drawn from my work with new, on-boarding leaders in a large, complex, world-class non-profit, the University of Michigan, and my continuing work for my own company,REVELN Consulting, co-written with my colleagues, senior partners at Ideas for Action, LLCAlan Davis, my former client and friend, Jolene Knapp, who are both talented, highly experienced non-profit CEO's and leaders. I'm pleased to be sharing with you ourSeven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job".

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What Works in the New Metropolis: The New Urban Pioneers

What Works in the New Metropolis: The New Urban Pioneers | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Meet the official in Chattanooga who built the fastest internet in the western hemisphere, the technocrat who revolutionized public transportation in Helsinki, the Berkeley professor who’s creating 3-D data maps of how cities work and more.

___________________

Singapore, ...first drafted its plan in the 1960s...followed so closely and creat[ing] such an economic powerhouse that the city-state now exports its urban know-how...created an economy unto itself.
_______________________



As Adie Tomer and Robert Puentes, fellows at the Brookings Metropolitan Infrastructure Initiative, put it: “It all starts with cities making a concerted effort to understand who they are and where they want to go.” Singapore, for example, first drafted its plan in the 1960s, and it has been followed so closely and created such an economic powerhouse that the city-state now exports its urban know-how, hosts conferences about planning, and assists cities around the world with their infrastructure issues—for a price. The plan, in other words, has created an economy unto itself.


_______________________


… in smaller urban areas, businesses often grow even faster than ….than in a vast metropolitan region, where they are one among many.

_______________________


 

For another approach...visit Edmonton, Alberta. Its City Vision 2040 program breaks down city planning into six categories (finance, green, grow, live, move, and prosper), and then looks at what works and doesn’t work. ....it considers all aspects of expansion, from the impact on Edmonton’s neighboring municipalities to current patterns of development, transportation, and land use. The Municipal Development Plan is debated publicly...different views and more ideas are brought to the table. .... transparency makes it easier for the public to buy into a plan for their city’s future.
 

The builders of smart cities have also learned....a single building or neighborhood might serve as the best test bed for trying out ideas. Boston’s Innovation District is one such example. There, 1,000 acres of South Boston waterfront has become its own talent draw, providing affordable office space, services such as Internet and office supplies and networking events.


... these special districts is that they can exist and thrive in cities large and small. In fact, in smaller urban areas, businesses often grow even faster than they would in a vast metropolitan region, where they are one among many.

 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

    Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

         

     

                   

     
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes, planning can work, and the idea of small implementation pilots has long been a good one in these case study examples. Note that one city's plan, does not a template make, but can serve as useful lessons noting that culture, beliefs and behaviors could vary significantly from one area to another.  ~  D

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From Twitter to a new kind of company with no managers, a "Holocracy"

From Twitter to a new kind of company with no managers, a "Holocracy" | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

“Management perspective looks at reports as resources – like how can you get the maximum value out of this person,” Stirman says. “But when I think resources, I think like natural gas or coal mines. Thinking about a person’s life that way just seemed really dehumanizing.”


______________________

He started spending one-on-one meetings talking to his reports about their lives, instead of their tasks, and productivity shot through the roof.

______________________


Frustrated with poor results, he decided to go off script. He started spending one-on-one meetings talking to his reports about their lives, instead of their tasks, and productivity shot through the roof.
 

______________________

 

“We don’t have a hierarchy of people, we have a hierarchy of circles.”

______________________

    

“When you sit across a table from someone, ask them ‘What’s going on in your life?’ That will always remove more hurdles than asking them ‘What’s blocking you at work?’” he said.

Stirman hit another wall trying to shield his team from external drama and politics. “Classic management advice, and all my mentors told me that insulating your team from things so they won’t worry will make them more productive and happier,” he says. “But they just got angry, and confused, and disconnected. I was constantly censoring all this information and they were way happier when they knew everything.”

...“The structure is totally built around the work the company needs to achieve its purpose,” Stirman explains. “We don’t have a hierarchy of people, we have a hierarchy of circles.”


...But Medium isn’t just taking a revolutionary approach to digital publishing – it’s changing the way companies operate too. As one of the fiercest and most faithful adopters of Holacracy – a radical new theory of corporate structure – Medium is experimenting with a completely management-free environment that’s laser focused on getting things done. 


Read more: http://ow.ly/nKJBL

 


Related posts by Deb:

    
   

 

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I have to wonder why this antiquated old-school management advice is still circulating to the likes of of this younger, IT saavy crowd.  Old habits die hard.  

This detailed article cites the positive side of letting go to embrace something very new.  The leader-writer, Jason Stirman, not a manager,  discovered a diverse motivations tool that seems to work for his group, and is in for the long haul on the manager-less experiment with Holacracy.   ~  Deb



 

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Marie Jeffery's curator insight, August 10, 2013 3:02 PM

Thanks for drawing our attention to this excellent post, Deb Nystrom!

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Undiscovered: The Sound Value of Creative Industries: Sex, Drugs, Rock 'N' Roll

Undiscovered: The Sound Value of Creative Industries: Sex, Drugs, Rock 'N' Roll | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Creative industries bring more than a feel good factor. They bring hard cash and jobs to any country that nurtures this sector."


Creatives often express an antipathy towards making commercial profit and their business skills can be limited – so policy makers and investors write them off as unpredictable and difficult to control, but this is stereotyping that is inhibiting growth!
 

____________________

The separation of creative and management processes is counterproductive ...ensuring the appropriate development of them/into marketable commodities is in short supply.

____________________


“Creative content sectors …are more likely to have their finance applications rejected by finance providers than non CIBs with similar risk profiles” but the evidence shows that creative SMEs have greater longevity than the industry average and, over the long term, deliver better returns."


…Within the Creative and Cultural Industries (CCI) sector, the functions of business management and creativity converge in a way that they don’t in other industries.

The separation of creative and management processes is counterproductive and the management of creatives and creative/cultural content in ensuring the appropriate manipulation and development of them/that content into marketable commodities is in short supply.
 

So there is a perceived risk in management and marketing – which is not backed up by the reality, as these figures show:
 

The average survival rates of CCIs after 5 years compared to all business
CCIs 49.7%    All UK businesses 46.9%
 

And for high growth firms it is even more impressive
CCIs 7.5%    All UK businesses 6%



What are creative and cultural industries? >>  @elebelfiore :  http://t.co/zR41O1qv)


Related blog topic from Deb:


   
    

   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I was intrigued by the statistics and the opportunity of this piece, featuring UK research.  In these trying time, financially and culturally, you still "gotta have art."  ~ Deb

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Bumps or Falls? Apple Stock Declines After CEO Cook Overhauls Management Team

Bumps or Falls?  Apple Stock Declines After CEO Cook Overhauls Management Team | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

All eyes on Apple Inc. ~ as stock prices decline after Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook embarked on a sweeping management overhaul at the world’s most valuable company.


These Apple top management changes were dramatic. The Bloomberg article has a tone of curiosity.  This could be bumps in the road, in the role of change navigation with leadership, or could signal decline.  Jobs was extolled in his product excellence.  Read about the man, however, and you'll see the complications and complexity.


_________________________


“While there will be concerns about future execution given Mr. Forstall’s departure, we note that Apple has navigated through past turnovers impeccably.”

_________________________


Time will tell, before too long with the next product launches.  Meanwhile, I cannot wait to get Google Maps back onto my updated iPhone, expected in December.  Thank goodness for my paid app:  Navigon  (Garmin app for my iPhone.)


Excerpts:

   

Apple Stock

Shares of Apple fell 2.7 percent to $587.70 at 9:44 a.m. in New York. Today is the first trading session since Apple announced the departure of mobile software head Scott Forstall and retail leader John Browett

   

_________________________


Cook dismissed Forstall after he refused to sign a public letter to Apple customers apologizing for the mapping software’s flaws...  Cook signed the letter instead.

_________________________


...“Both departures were likely forced by Apple’s CEO,” Amit Daryanani, an analyst at RBC Capital Markets, wrote ...  “While there will be concerns about future execution given Mr. Forstall’s departure, we note that Apple has navigated through past turnovers impeccably.”

   

Mapping Software

Forstall was responsible for the mapping software introduced last month that was widely faulted for bad directions and missing features, marring the debut of the iPhone 5. 


Cook dismissed Forstall after he refused to sign a public letter to Apple customers apologizing for the mapping software’s flaws, according to a person briefed on the matter. Cook signed the letter instead.


The management changes leave Ive, who already heads industrial design, with more authority over the vision and details of Apple’s products.  ...Before he died last year, Jobs controlled the experience, melding input from disparate teams. In the new structure, Ive takes on that role.


Retail ‘Mistake’

In August, after Apple had reduced staffing at some retail locations, cut hours and limited store transfers under Browett’s leadership, the company backtracked on the new policies, calling them a “mistake.”


See the full article, including a 9 minute video here.


Photo credit:  Bloomberg

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IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual

IBM's CEO report: Collaboration Tools are a Means of Business Success, Face-to-Face Shift to Virtual | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks."


Photo caption:  Preparing for the Google+ Hangout with the UN Secretary-General.


Where One Door Closes:  I'm doing a Google+ hangout today to discuss setting up a blogging circle with friends nearby and in another time zone.  I maintain several relationships using Skype, Google+ hangout, Facebook and Pinterest.  


The doors are opening to new methods not as bound by silos and other traditional organizational boundaries.  In business, conversational tools and collaborative tools, like PowerNoodle, a collaboration idea sharing tool, are becoming mainstream.


_____________________


There’s irony in an IBM report of how CEO’s are seeing their businesses changing, based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries...
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It's little wonder that CEO's are seeing the value of screen-time, even thought this well researched IBM study was conducted face-to-face.  The article from Formtek Blog has a title that is not as neutral:  ...Eroding the need for Face-to-Face in Business.   Yet it is hopeful.


Some excerpts:


There’s irony in the IBM report as the first page — contains only the words: “This study is based on face-to-face conversations with more than 1,700 chief executive officers in 64 countries.”


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Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.

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Several major findings:


  • CEO’s are seeing less value in face-to-face encounters and are increasingly pursuing social media and collaboration technologies for interacting with others.
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  • Over 50% [of the CEO's interviewed] expect social channels to be a primary way of engaging customers within five years.”

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  • 20% of CEO’s said that social media already is one of their most important forms of interaction with others

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  • 57% thought that within another 3-5 years social media would become important.

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  • Currently 80% see face-to-face interactions as very important today, that’s expected to slip to just 67 percent who will feel that way in 3-5 years.




CEO’s are seeing collaboration increasingly as a tool that can be used to bring about team building and cooperation, allowing executives within the organization to work cross-functionally.


Collaboration tools allows all disciplines within the company to work more closely together.


_____________________


CEOs will need to learn from their own networks. They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios.

_____________________


Bridget van Kralingen, vice president of IBM Global Business Services, commented, ”Rather than ...de-personalising human relationships, this view leans heavily in favour of deepening them, and using dynamic social networks to harness collective intelligence to unlock new models of collaboration.”


Pierre Morin a partner at IBM Global Business Services, said that “...they want people across the organization to feel comfortable reaching out to the CEO to share ideas or engage a discussion. Social media is a mechanism to do that.”


The IBM report concludes that


“To lead in unfamiliar territory amid constant change, CEOs will need to learn from their own networks.


They will need to assemble those networks like portfolios—with generational, geographic, institutional diversity. Then, they’ll need to help their organizations do the same.”


Read the full post here.

Photo credit:  Flickr, cc, by specialoperations

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10 Ways Social Media can support Change Engagement and Connection

10 Ways Social Media can support Change Engagement and Connection | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Leading change is about being connecting to and engaging everyone affected by the change, a strength of social media.

 

Change leaders have engaged infrastructure that includes social media in other examples on this newsletter curation stream including IBM, Proctor & Gamble and Apple.

 

Excerpts:

Acceptance of change – processes, services, working relationships, policies and more - can be accelerated across the organization through the real-time sharing of experiences.

 

Social networking and collaboration applications are extremely effective ways of bringing employees together to perform new processes and to share experiences – both the successes and the temporary setbacks. People with common interests or related roles can form communities to learn from and support one another.

 

 Deb:  At key points, it's important to create the environments and provide several good tools that allow staff to do this for themselves, instead of attempting to engineer all of this from the top.  Social media policies and guidelines help immensely.


Via Virtual Global Coaching
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The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages | Change Thinking

The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages  | Change Thinking | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Many imitators, one original (from the 80's.)


Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve has been copied in many places.  This post clarifies the orgins of this classic, and often copied, with a word tweak or two, model.


Another rendition of it is listed in this recent blog post focused on managing resistance via Daryl Conner's 1993 book:  Managing at the Speed of Change.


Daryl's research from long ago spotted consistent patterns.  His model highlights a fairly predictable path organization members must travel when managing their own anxiety around change.


This path typically moves along the timeline:

  • Uniformed Optimism (blissful ignorance)
  • Informed Pessimism (informed anguish)
  • Checking out
  • Overt (public)
  • Covert (private)
  • Hopeful Realism (coming to terms)
  • Informed Optimism (realistic support)
  • Completion



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Pat Heffernan's curator insight, May 13, 11:59 AM

Though this Change Commitment Curve was developed for internal organizational change, it mirrors classic social and behavioral #change stages -- Same goal, common stages, common barriers.