Change and Continuity in the H.S.I.E classroom - Stages in a lifetime
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Reference List

Reference List 

Beatrix Greenhalgh's insight:

 

 

Clay, M. M. (1991). Introducing a New Storybook to Young Readers. The reading Teacher, 45(4), 264

 

Edwards-Groves, C., (2003). On Task: focused literacy learning. Newtown, N.S.W.: Primary English Teaching Association.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

Green, D (2006). So what should my classroom look like? In R. Campbell & D. Green (Eds.), Literacies and learners: current perspectives (3rd ed) Frenchs Forest, N.S.W.: Pearson Education Australia

 

Ministerial Council on Educaiton, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs. (2008). Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians.  http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/national_declaration_on_the_educational_goals_for_young_australians.pdf

 

NSW DET (2004). Aboriginal Education Training Policy. 

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Cherbourg School Picture Diaries

Beatrix Greenhalgh's insight:

This website is an E-book from the State Library of Queensland website. The resource is a picture diary written by the children of Cherbourg public school in Northern Queensland which is a school with predominantly Indigenous students.  The diary is full of artworks made by children accompanied by information about where they live, what they love and who they are.

 

Teaching ideas: Before students begin reading the e-book, teacher locates Cherbourg State School on a map. Then locate their own school on a map. Show students images of the town, school website. Discuss how this is different to their school and where they live. Joint reading of E-book using the interactive white board. After reading discuss the similarities and differences between the students of Cherbourg school and their own lives. Explain that these students are Indigenous Australians and what that means. Students use their individual small whiteboards to write down one similarity and one difference, take turns reading out answers.  Aboriginal perspectives are incorporated into the HSIE syllabus to provide all students with the opportunity to learn about the Aboriginal history, society and cultures (DET 2004).

 

Students write their own description of who they are, what they love and where they live. In a Creative Arts lesson they could illustrate their work. The teacher could conclude the unit by making their own class picture diary.

 

Numeracy/Literacy strategy: Literacy is incorporated into the activity when students discuss the similarities and differences and use the mini whiteboards to write their own opinions of similarities and differences. There is also a suggested literacy task of writing a brief description of their own story.  Students create a joint construction of a text with the help of their teacher and peers (Green, 2006, p.243)

 

Assessment strategy: The teacher collects work samples of students description of their own life, look for spelling, grammar and accurate information. Were students accurately able to depict their own life?

 

#Indigenous #AboriginalEducationTrainingPolicy #Picturebook #Ebook #Churbourg #Allaboutme #Stagesinalifetime #Stage1 #HSIE

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Ben Dawborn's curator insight, April 7, 2014 5:34 AM

The Cherbourg School Picture Diaries is a unique e-book, sourced from the State Library of Queensland. 11 Indigenous students in the town of Cherbourg constructed the text in 2007. It is the story and artwork of each child, showing what they have a passion for in their current life stage. This resource was ‘re-scooped’ from Beatrix Greenhalgh’s page, Change and Continuity in the HSIE classroom- Stages in a Lifetime. All credit for finding this resource goes to her and she has some high quality teaching suggestions in her annotations of the resource. The text would be engaging for students as the language is simple and the text limited, but it is also accompanied by beautiful artwork. Each diary entry is personal and interesting, giving students in the classroom an insight into the lives of these Indigenous Australian children’s lives.

 

Before reading the text hold a class poll, asking students what they think is the current life stage they are in. Some suggestions could be childhood, stage one, living at home, dependent, lower primary school. This could hold a numeracy link in graphs and data that could be explored further using an online polling tool and excel to create basic graphs.Scaffolding students to collate and analyse data in a tables and graphs is a quality teaching pedagogy as it provides an accessible way for young students to understand a wide range of ideas in a concise, concrete and visual way (Bobis, Mulligan & Lowrie, 2013, p.79).

 

What is important to people in the same life stage as you? Create a word cloud on the smart board as a way of recording the class brainstorm. Introduce the story to the class by talking about diaries and what people write in them, but also introduce the students to the town of Cherbourg, locating it on a map or looking at the school website (as suggested by Beatrix Greenhalgh). Read the text to the class and ask them what was important to each of the students in the text. The suggested ideas should be similar to those students had suggested for the word cloud, such as sport, family, a house, having good friends, etc.

 

The aim of this would be for students to gain an understanding that people of a similar life stage value the same or similar things. To assess their understanding the students could construct their own diary entry (a literacy link) explaining their own interests and values and then choosing one student from the Picture Diaries that shares this interest. In a visual arts lesson students could construct an artwork depicting their friendship with this person. For example, if a student really valued their friends, they could choose Blanche, who also values friendship, and the artwork could be of them with a large group of friends going shopping or playing in the schoolyard.

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Historic Houses Trust excursion: Lessons from the Past

Beatrix Greenhalgh's insight:

This resource is a link to an excursion organized by the Historic Houses Trust. The excursion is called ‘Lessons from the Past’ and gives students a taste of what school life was like for a child in colonial times. Students get to take part in role play classroom activities including; sewing lessons, and outdoor drill and games. This would be a highly engaging and unique experience for students. It would give them a great insight into what the lives of their great grandparents were like.

 

Teaching idea: Students do a unit of work on ‘then and now’ comparing their own lives to children who lived many years ago. Show students photographs and artifacts from older times. Could get a grandparent in to share stories about when they were a child. Focus on children, play and school as these are interesting, relevant topics to students.  Follow up with an excursion to Rouse Hill house. Students could have a day at school where they all dress up in old fashion clothes, play old fashion games and the teacher runs the classroom like old fashion times. Edwards-Groves believe learning occurs as a result of interactive support provided at the micro (or task) level, when it is appropriately located within the macro framework of a planned program( 2003, p, 35).  This excursion would be a fantastic way to engage students in the concept of then and now, bringing personal photos in of themselves and their family would make the content extremely relevant to them as well.

 

Literacy Strategy: Students write a recount on the excursion. Students write up a comparison table as a class on what school was like then and now.

 

Assessment Task: At the conclusion of the unit of work, students write a reflection on the ways then was different to now and three ways it is the same.

 

#stage1 #HSIE #stagesinalifetime #historichousestrust #thenandnow #excursion #RouseHillHouse #identity 

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OLD SCHOOL, BTN documentary

Beatrix Greenhalgh's insight:

This is a short documentary on Rouse Hill House. This provides students with an insight into what school was like in the 19th century. The documentary shows students what to expect if they visited this school. This would be a great documentary to show students if they weren’t able to go on the actual excursion (due to location, cost etc.). The documentary talks about; discipline, content, uniform and much more. Students would not only find this interesting because they could relate to it, but would find it humorous and enjoyable to watch.

 

Teaching idea: Students watch the documentary. Discuss the text type. Discuss what school was like in the 19th century in Australia. As a class, create two separate mind maps of how life was at school then and now. Show students images of school in 19th century and school in the present day. Discuss. For homework, students undertake a survey to a grandparent/parent/elderly friend on what school was like for them. The class should come up with the questions together in a lesson. Questions such as; what sort of things did you get in trouble for? Did you enjoy school? What was your uniform? etc. Students use their findings to make conclusions about how things have changed. Students write a discussion to decide weather school was better then or now and why. This offers a critical orientation to the curriculum (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).  This approach means students critically inquire into various issues and phenomena (2011, p.52). Students are actively exploring why and how change has occurred in their local community.

 

Numeracy strategy: Data is explored in creating interview questions and coming to conclusions based on information.

 

Literacy strategy: Students write a discussion text. Teacher would scaffold on white board first. Students would use their own findings/opinions to write the text.

 

Assessment strategy:  Informal assessment by listening to students in discussion. Do they understand how and in particular why school has changed?

 

#thenandnow #school #stagesinalifetime #BTN #documentary #stage1 #RouseHillHouse #oldendays #HSIE

 

 

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A Day in the Life of Lucy: World Vision Australia

A Day in the Life of Lucy: World Vision Australia | Change and Continuity in the H.S.I.E classroom - Stages in a lifetime | Scoop.it
Beatrix Greenhalgh's insight:

This website is a link to the World Vision ‘school resources’ section, which has been specifically developed for teachers to use in the classroom with students of all ages. This specific resource is called ‘A day in the life of Lucy’, a young girl who lives in a rural village in Uganda. Activities can be integrated together or can easily stand alone.  Some of the activities on this page would not be appropriate for stage 1 students. The reason I have chosen this activity is to embed a global perspective into the outcome ‘stages in a lifetime’.  Global integration has increased rapidly in the past decade. Consequently, this heightens the need to nurture an appreciation of and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity and a sense of global citizenship (Melbourne Declaration of Educational Goals for Young Children, 2008).

 

Students will be able to compare their own lives with that of a girl very similar to them living a completely different life on the other side of the world. This should be the focus of the resources rather than focusing on what is poverty, why is clean water important and exploring the rights of children. The links that the teacher would focus on is ‘a day in the life of Lucy film clip’ to start with, ‘Lucy’s story’, ‘make a toy’, ‘play a game’ and ‘what does it mean to share’.

 

This resource is highly engaging for students. It is relatable yet offers something different to their own lives and interesting. It is relevant to ‘stages in a lifetime’ as it compares another child of a similar age to the students lives. Finally, it is very appropriate for stage 1. Some of the themes are complex such as poverty and inequality, however it is a fantastic way to get students engaged and interested in global issues which hopefully would begin to raise awareness for such issues at a young age. This study would encourage students to develop the three forms of knowledge; technical interpretive and emancipatory by critically examining Lucy’s situation  (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011).

 

Teaching idea: The teacher shows the students the clip ‘A day in the life of Lucy’ (link). Class discussion about what Lucy’s life is like. Locate Uganda on a world map. Discuss how it is different/similar to their own life, building on the technical form of knowledge (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.49). Draw a ven diagram on the board comparing their own lives with Lucy’s life. Use the link ‘Lucy’s Story’ where there are many more activities. Students complete the story book activity where they illustrate in groups of 3 the different aspects of Lucy’s life. This should give them a deeper understanding of Lucy’s life as well as helping them share and work in teams by creating an illustration together. This should be followed by a class discussion as to why Lucy’s life is different to their own, developing an interpretive form of knowledge where students are thinking about why things are the way they are (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p.48). In a follow up lesson, students make a toy that Lucy would play with. As a class, discuss the different toys different children around the world have access to and why this is the case.

 

This would be a fantastic unit of work if the particular class were having bullying/sharing issues. The clip emphasizes the importance of sharing and being kind. Teachers use the link (what does it mean to share).  Students discuss and fill out the worksheet.

 

Finally this unit of work could be integrated into roles and responsibilities where students could discuss chores they do at home to help out and compare this to what other children do and why chores/helping is important.

 

Literacy strategy: Literacy is embedded all throughout this unit of work, in comparing students own life with Lucy’s, answering questions on the worksheets and thinking deeply about the way they do things in their own life.

 

Numeracy strategy: Students could do a unit of work on sharing equally/not equally (basic division).

 

Idea for assessment task: Teacher collects the ‘what does it mean to share’ worksheet. These questions are higher order questions such as ‘why do you think people share’. The worksheet also asks basic comprehension questions such as ‘what were two things Lucy shared’.  It asks students to relate the information to their own experiences when they have shared something. Teacher can see if students understood the purpose of the clip and if they are able to identify differences in their own lives to Lucy’s.

 

#WorldVision #Uganda #Stagesinalifetime #Globalperspective #Documentary #sharing #Poverty #Stage1

 

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National Museum of Australia classroom activities: Feeding the Family Unit of Work

Beatrix Greenhalgh's insight:

 

This resource is a link to a Unit of Work teachers can use in the classroom. It looks at family structures and roles today and how these have changed or remained the same over time. In this unit of work students will also explore the differences and similarities between their daily lives and life during their parents and grandparents childhoods; including family traditions, leisure time and communications. The website includes a 10 minute video which clearly outlines how teachers can use this unit to help students develop inquiry based skills.

 

Teaching idea: Teacher may wish to focus on the ‘picnics’ link. Engage students in a discussion about picnics by asking questions such as; what is a picnic? Why do we go on picnics? Who has been on a picnic? What do we take? This draws on students background knowledge of the subject which engages them and makes the content relatable (Clay, 1991).  Furthermore, this process draws the children into the activity before passing control to the children and pushing them gently towards problem solving when they analyse the information in greater detail (Clay, 1991).

 

Show students all different photos of picnics throughout time on the Interactive White Board. Discuss each picture in detail – write points next to each one. Discuss how picnics have changed over time. What in the photographs tells us about the time? As a class work out the correct timeline for the pictures. This helps students identify features that make something of a particular time.

 

Students do their own investigations on how picnics have changed. Interview parents and grandparents on what their picnics were like as children. Focus on

Food, transport, picnic sets, locations, clothing, group sizes, games, links to celebrations etc. Students could orally present their findings in news.

 

This could link into discussing what different cultures/people bring on picnics and how different people eat different foods.

 

Literacy Strategy: Students write a creative piece on life in the past. They use the information they have learnt in this unit of work and create a story based upon this new knowledge.

 

Assessment strategy: Students present their research findings in news. They should discuss what they found out and how they found it out – focusing on enquiry. The teacher could also collect work samples of creative writing to see if students understood the differences in their own lives to their parents/grandparents.

                    

#stage1 #HSIE #stagesinalifetime #picnics #thenandnow #family #communication #change

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