Change and Continuity in Sydney - roles, traditions, practices and customs
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Schoolhouse Museum of Public Education - North Ryde, NSW

Schoolhouse Museum of Public Education - North Ryde, NSW | Change and Continuity in Sydney - roles, traditions, practices and customs | Scoop.it
The NSW Schoolhouse Museum of Public Education provides a glimpse of schooling from the past. The museum is a popular excursion venue for schools.
Jessica Robertson's insight:
 

The NSW School Museum of Public Education website provides a range of digital resources that can be used by teachers for the area of study Change and Continuity in the local area.  The school museum is located in North Ryde and dates back to 1877. 

 

The NSW Schoolhouse Museum “collects and preserves objects and items relating to the history of public education in NSW” such as early texts, pupils’ work, teaching resources and items from children’s daily lives.  The museum provides students with primary sources of information regarding school life dating back to 1877. 

 

Whilst the museum offers excursions, the website contains rich digital resources for student inquiry.  The digital content accessible via the website allows students to compare life of the past to that of today through the focus of schooling.  This content includes a flickr account (https://www.flickr.com/photos/nswschoolhousemuseum/) with rich visual photographic resources, an online archive of the museum’s collection (http://ehive.com/what-is-ehive), fact sheets such as “Early School Days” which recounts traveling to school, discipline, and what children took to school and youtube videos. These technologies allow students to “transcend the passive learner role” and take control of their learning. (Mishra, & Koehler, 2006, p. 1035)

 

The varied digital resources provide teachers and students with wide scope of inquiry and diversity of representations.  To use in the classroom, students could be shown the photos from the museums flickr account to make a comparison with the classroom the students are in.  After making a list of the similarities and differences, a class discussion about the change and continuity could follow.  Through this inquiry approach to pedagogy, “students are producing knowledge by investigating a situation” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 46).

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences; History, Geography, Economics & Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. (Chapter 3 Planning for teaching through critical inquiry)

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A

Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record Volume 108, Number 6, pp.1017-1054

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Education Creations's curator insight, May 11, 2014 10:06 PM

This site is well structured, informative, easy to read and easy to navigate.  A great example of how to set up a site which effectively informs teachers about what you have to offer. 

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Newspaper Archives

Newspaper Archives | Change and Continuity in Sydney - roles, traditions, practices and customs | Scoop.it
Jessica Robertson's insight:

The Trove website by the National Library of Australia has a newspaper archive that digitised 5 state and national publications including The Australian Women’s Weekly and Sydney Morning Herald.  Newspapers date from 1803 to 2007 and can be selected by year, month and day.   There is also a search option that can narrow the scope to a subject for inquiry, for example, sport.

 

To incorporate this resource into the classroom, the teacher could select a newspaper from each decade for the students to look at.  This could be shown on a digital whiteboard or printed out.  Students could be split in to groups for each decade and identify what has made “news” and make up a table to tally the types of articles; sports, politics, jobs related etc.  These could then be reported to the class followed by a whole class group discussion about the similarities and differences of news over time in Sydney and how this reflects change and continuity in the local area.  This activity engages students in “practices of inquiry, research, and design in collaborative groups” (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p. 1036). 

 

Particular foci for inquiry could be how the newspapers document and reflect the changes in transportation and the role of men and women and the impact this has had on the community to cover the curriculum requirements.  In keeping with the critical inquiry focus of the Australian Curriculum, researching newspapers over time could help students to identify and evaluate the “effects of deeply held beliefs and taken-for-granted assumptions that underpin life in society” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 53).

 

Another area of study could be to compare the tradition of technology used in producing newspapers - from printing press to now where we are able to view publications online, new and old.  The students could produce a timeline of the technological changes in newspaper production. 

 

The Trove website also includes digitally archived diaries, letters, pictures and photos.  The teacher could introduce the website to students as a place to find primary sources of information for research in to change and continuity in the local area. 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences; History, Geography, Economics & Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. (Chapter 3 Planning for teaching through critical inquiry)

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework For Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record Volume 108, Number 6, pp. 1017-1054

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Who are we?

Who are we? | Change and Continuity in Sydney - roles, traditions, practices and customs | Scoop.it
Jessica Robertson's insight:

The ‘Who Are We?’ website was produced by the NSW Department of Education and Training, The British Council of Australia and ABC.  It has content relating to Stage 2 exploration of customs and traditions at a familial, local, national and global level.  It contains definitions of key terms such as ‘rituals’ and ‘customs’, which could be included in new vocabulary, and outlines lesson plans for teachers to use in the classroom. 

 

In relating to change and continuity, this website is a useful teaching resource with ideas for engaging students in area of study, and could have the key inquiry question – “Who Are We?”.  Using an inquiry approach - to “establish what we want to find out, finding out and deciding what to do with what we’ve found” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 49) a particular focus such as events that are celebrated could be used.  A lesson plan is provided that allows students to identify personal, local and national celebrations by using a table template provided on the site.  To take this further, teacher could instruct students to select an event that they celebrate, or interests them, and map the history and spread of it in their local area, identifying the origins and the number of people that celebrate it.  A report of this information could be the cumulative assignment.  This provides an inquiry for students for the change and continuity of customs, practices and rituals in their local area.  Thus, students know they are researching celebrations, are guided by the teacher to identify and research celebrations in the classroom and local area, which is complied in to a research report.  Using this resource allows for an interweaving of technology, pedagogy and content. (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p. 1029)

 

Another area of study could focus on language and how that has changed in the local area.  A study of the languages spoken in the classroom and local area could be conducted.  To embed an Aboriginal perspective, the teacher could use the map of indigenous Australian languages (accessible via this link http://www.abc.net.au/indigenous/map/ which also uses a magnify tool).   The local area could be overlaid on the map to make students aware of Sydney’s Aboriginal History. 

 

Also included on the website are tools to assist students to navigate internet resources safely using search engines such as ‘yahooligans’ and http://www.squirrelnet.com/search/Google_SafeSearch.asp

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences; History, Geography, Economics & Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. (Chapter 3 Planning for teaching through critical inquiry)

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A

Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record Volume 108, Number 6, pp.1017-1054

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Rice is life - YouTube

http://www.greenpeace.org/rice Photographer John Novis on sustainable rice farming communities in Southern China. For farmers of Southern China, rice is more...
Jessica Robertson's insight:

‘Rice is Life’ documents the rice culture in Yunnan province, China, in a video produced by journalist John Novis for Greenpeace.  In the 5 minute video, the viewer is introduced to the customs, traditions, pracitces and roles of the Yunnan people and their rice culture.  Novis entered the region to document the people and their practice and decided to showcase photographs taken by the Yunnan people themselves, in an exhibition. 

 

There is a lot of content that could be explored in the classroom regarding change and continuity of roles, traditions, practices and customs.  In using this resource, I would allow space, after initial viewings of the video, for students to volunteer their responses to the video; what they found interesting, different or similar for a more meaningful engagement (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.58).  This could then drive group discussions and further independent inquiry.

 

Subject matter that could be discussed include not only that of the rice heritage and culture of Yunnan, but additionally how this is being threatened by industrial farming.  In the classroom this could be further studied and differences between traditional and industrial processes and how this impacts on cultural traditions, rituals, practices and customs.  Through critical pedagogy, students are able to describe, explain and evaluate their world and “propose changes that might make the world more just, peace and sustainable” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 53). 

 

This study could then be used for students to identify comparisons between Yunnan and their own local area history. Whilst studying a global perspective, this approach allows students to “develop an understanding of the relation of it with their lives” (Lave, 1997 in Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p. 1034).  Students could be introduced to ways of finding out information about the local area history via primary or secondary resources.  In assessing students, literary account or table of these comparisons could be produced, which will also assess literacy knowledge. 

 

The video is accessible via youtube and the Asia education website (see link below) and photographic stills can be accessed here http://www.greenpeace.org/eastasia/multimedia/slideshows/food-agriculture/photo-exhibition-the-land-give/

These photos can provide a more indepth study of the cultural traditions, rituals and customs of the Yunnan people.

 

More video resources for stage 2 HSIE can be found here for a global perspective inquiry - http://www.asiaeducation.edu.au/curriculum_resources/technologies/years_3-4_rice_growing_across_the_asia_region.html 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences; History, Geography, Economics & Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. (Chapter 3 Planning for teaching through critical inquiry)

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A

Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record Volume 108, Number 6, pp.1017-1054

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Barani - Sydney's Aboriginal History

Barani - Sydney's Aboriginal History | Change and Continuity in Sydney - roles, traditions, practices and customs | Scoop.it
Jessica Robertson's insight:

The Barani website provides an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander historical perspective of people, places and events in the City of Sydney local government area.  Of particular focus is Sydney’s Aboriginal journey, presented in essays, a map, timeline, biographies, resources and contemporary cultural events.  Produced by the City of Sydney, the site emphasises that the culture of the Gadigal people, the original inhabitants of Sydney city region, which survived, despite the destructive impact of first contact. 

 

There is a lot of information on the website that could be used to support teachers knowledge of Sydney’s Aboriginal history, and used to guide students in researching the change and continuity in their local community from an Aboriginal perspective. 

 

Historical events could be researched and students could then make their own timeline as well as map the specific locations on a map of Sydney city.  In doing the latter, students will be able to learn geographical skills at the same time.  In building on this unit of study, excursions could take place at some of the sites explained on the website and students could document what is similar and different through and inquiry of who lived there then and now.  As noted by Gruenewald places are pedagogical (Gruenewald, 2003, p. 621 in Taylor et al., 2012, p. 250), therefore students would be introduced to potentially new perspectives of Sydney’s history and compare this to the stories that they know of these places today through this investigation. 

 

The lists of dual naming of places around Sydney as well as common nouns could be used in the classroom, incorporating the English spelling of words in to the vocabulary for students, and introducing the local Aboriginal language at the same time.  Using a map of Indigenous languages could support this learning. 

 

The site also has links to a vast amount of resources for further study that could help students finding more resources for deep investigations.  Teachers could explain how the information for the website was gathered from sources such as texts, websites, organizations and essays, and how students could apply this to find out information, using primary and secondary resources, thus modeling and scaffolding inquiry skills for students (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 48).

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences; History, Geography, Economics & Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. (Chapter 3 Planning for teaching through critical inquiry)

 

Taylor, T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J., Boon,D. (2012). Place and Time: Explorations in teaching geography and history. Frenchs Forest: Pearson. (Chapter 15: The Permeable Classroom)

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