Changes to People and Places in the Sydney Region as a result of the British Colonisation
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Changes to People and Places in the Sydney Region as a result of the British Colonisation
Stage 2

•CCS2.1: Describes events and actions related to the British colonisation of Australia and assesses changes and consequences Time and Change: CCS2.2- Explains changes in the community and family life and evaluates the effects of these on different individuals, groups and environments.


Subject Matter- Changes to People and Places in the Sydney Region as a result of British Colonisation
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European colonial Empires, British, French in the 19th and 20th Centuries - The Map as History

Europe’s colonial expansion : colonization of Africa, colonization of Asia, Indian Empire, French Colonial Empire, British Empire, colonies and colonial empires of European countries
Ryan Tleis's insight:

This is a great site when getting students to look at the European Colonisation in a more of a Global perspective where students can look at the changes and effects it had on around many countries and the world. The site provides a range of different animated maps with audio sound which students can click on and hear the involvement of the Europeans. The site shows another means or side of the historical routes of Europe's Colonial expansion. The maps allow teachers and students to look at the European Presence and their colonisation around the world and the changes to these Countries. When looking at the site we see the routes of different countries which includes the European expansion in the Far East, the British Empire in India, the conquest and resistance in French Indochina, colonisation and settlement of Algeria and the resistance and uprisings in Africa and conquest. For each continent, the site proves us with information of the changes and impact on the countries

 

This is a great resource for teachers that can be seen as a start off when teaching students the topic of British Colonisation of Australian and also the introducing or incorporating a global perspective towards their learning about the arrival, expansion and. The maps on the site alter the many different direction/ routes of the various continents or countries worldwide; this will further allows students to initiate a class discussion where they are engaged to ask questions on the topic of colonisation. Teachers could display the maps on the site to the children and play the audio to help further initiate the class discussion. Through getting students to view the site and listen to the audio students can come to an understanding or even talk about how Colonisation can be seen as a powerful means of gaining  power (rules), domination,  increasing finance, expansion of population,  creating new markets & modernization and the given resources for the European economies from other countries around the world. This also allows students to understand the many benefits the Europeans gain and achieve

 

A  teaching idea-  A literacy activity may include getting students have a choice to learn about two different countries that have been colonised by the Europeans where students can look at the differences and similarities and write answers down into a  two Colum table. This will help make it easier for students to present their information and compare the differences

This can be seen as a cultural influence on a global scale. Globalisation surrounds an understanding of “complex social, economic and political links between people, and the impact that changes have on others”(Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. 2011, p.368).  Students are to look at the differences and similarities in a global perspective meaning they are to look at the changes, impact, consequences, etc. The benefits the European gain and the impact it has on the other continents. Students can also focus on a particular group such as the Aboriginal / Indigenous people. Where students can research and look up how the colonisation affected/ impacted on the Aboriginal/ Indigenous people, how were they treated differently, etc. Teachers can get students to think about the rights and social justice of the Aboriginal/ Indigenous People weather they were given their rights and where treated the way they should’ve been treated. Teacher is to explain to the students the importance of Values and attitudes and how it governs the ways in which people interact with each other and the environment. Students are given the opportunities to identify, clarify, apply, analyse and evaluate their own values and attitudes, and those of others. These opportunities will help to develop students as active, informed and responsible citizens who will work towards promoting a democratic and socially just society in a sustainable environment at a global level. They will help students to develop informed and responsible attitudes towards people, societies, cultures and environments in the past, present and future.

 

References:

PRETINI, J., BERCHADSKY, A. (2005). Europe’s Colonial Expansion. Retrieved April 5th, 2013 from http://www.the-map-as-history.com/maps/5-history-europe-colonization.php

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning

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didntlookunit.pdf

Ryan Tleis's insight:

The unit of work is a beneficial resource that is targeted towards Stage 2 students that mainly focuses on the outcome of CCS2.2 but also incorporates outcome CCS2.1 that reflect on the subject matter. The resource is seen as a great piece of work for both teachers and students as it provides teachers with a range of information and resources to use when learning on the topic of Changing Place- were we look at the changes to the local area as a result to the British Arrival and the historical impact of the European settlement on the geography of the local area .Activities used for both teachers and students include; worksheets, handouts, stories, articles, etc related to the topic of the heritage of the area Penrith and the changes of the area as a result of the British Colonisation. The unit of work also incorporates an Aboriginal Perspective- where both teachers and students gain an insight on the effects the Colonists had on the Aboriginal people.

 

The unit of work is focused on the Sydney Area- Penrith Lakes

The unit of work provides students and teachers with information about the changes to the area of Penrith and the effects it had on people, communities and the environment. The unit of work looks at the Penrith Lakes where it talks about rocks being a scared part for the Aboriginal people and due to the European Settlement the rocks, pebbles that were used to make tools for Aboriginal people to hunt for food was taken away from them to make roads and buildings.

The resource looks at the Colonists arrival in Castlereagh were student have a look at the many changes to area and consequences people had to face due to the changes- i.e. people leaving their homes, Aboriginal people being shot at, hundreds of Darug People were killed and big wars ended in the Penrith area. Students are also able to look at the development of Castlereagh and the changes involved, were students  look at how farms became smaller, railway to Penrith was finished (the establishment of Transport) which was very different and new for the Darug People as they had their own style of travelling (lifestyle), dairying became important, refrigeration was introduced, etc. The arrival of the Colonists is also incorporated in the resource- students look at the changes to people due to the arrival of the colonists in Castlereagh- e.g. As the colonists made their farms they cleared the traditional hunting and farming lands of the Darug and drove away the wildlife that was an important part of their diet.

 

A teaching Idea-Get students to research pictures on the Penrith Lakes area where they can look at a before and after images – where students are able to compare the area before the British Arrival and how it used to look, where they are then to  compare the After picture where students can look at the changes to the area as a result to the arrival of the Europeans.

Get students to identify  the changes that have occurred to the local area over time e.g. changes to the natural and built environment can easily be seen. Teachers can ask students:

•   Why might these changes have occurred?

•   What positive or negative effects would these changes have on the local environment and on the people who lived there?

Get students to write down their answers while asking them questions and then get the students to share their what they have written down to the class

 

An activity that reflects on numeracy includes getting students to create their own timeline based on the changes of the local area. Students may include the date, change and consequence or impact it had on the people in the area (Penrith Lakes)

 

Teaching Idea- Organise an excursion to the Brewongle Environmental Education Centre:  The centre provides students with Aboriginal Education studies in the Hawkesbury area and the life of the Darug tribe who occupied their region. Sudents engage in a discussion of the Darug tribe lifestyle, distribution and family traditions

 

References:

NSW Heritage Office (1999), It didn’t always look like this, Human Society and Its Environment K-6 syllabus, Board of Studies NSW, Sydney 

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k6hsie_stg2_unitsofwork.pdf

Ryan Tleis's insight:

"What happened to the Aboriginal People as a result of British Colonisation"?

 

The Board of Studies unit of work is a beneficial resource for teachers to use when teaching the topic British Colonisation. The Consequences of British Colonisation for Aboriginal People section derived from the unit of work focuses on how the British Colonisation placed on the Eora People of the Sydney Region and the consequences the Eora People faced due to the imposed changes of the European Settlers (CCS2.1) . The resource allows teachers to understand and comprehend the changes and consequences the Eora People faced. The consequence chart makes it easier for teachers to understand and teach the concept to students. Before teaching students about the consequences and changes faced by the Eora People, students are able to research and look back at the lifestyle of the Eora People in the local area( reading ) prior to the arrival of the Europeans (1788). Through this students investigate and explore the rituals and lifestyle of the Eora People where they are then able to assess the severity of the changes and the effects placed on the Eora People. A teaching Idea for students is getting them to create their own consequence chart- through the explanation of the teacher and the research students conduct prior

As Bain (2000) acknowledges, it is the teacher who, after reading the literature, is the one left to “design activities that engage student in using such thinking in the classroom” (p. 334).

Through this teaching idea students strongly reflect on the Blooms Taxonomy. This can be seen through the concept of ‘Remembering’ – where students list the consequences of the arrival of the British on the Aboriginal People. ‘Understanding’- students describe how the lives of the Eora People were changed by the arrival of the British. ‘Applying’- students construct their own consequence charts for the Eora People: where students are to incorporate the information they had researched, based  on the lifestyle and the changes for the Eora People and use the acquired information gained by the teacher as a result of the resource itself (unit of work consequence chart). ‘Analysing’- where student are able to analyse and think of Why do the British refer to the First Fleet as colonisers but the Aboriginal people refer to them as invaders. This will allow students to reflect on their consequence chart and look at the impact and changes on the Eora People and the result of why they refer to the British Colonists as Invaders. ‘Evaluating’-where students are able to evaluate and assess how has the colonisation of the British effected Aboriginal People of today? As another teaching idea as part of ‘Creating’- students can create a policy centred on the British and Aboriginal People and how that policy would have allowed them to live in harmony.

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW (2001), Human Society And Its Environment K--6 Units of Work, Board of Studies NSW, Sydney

 

Bain, R. (2000). Into the breach: Using research and theory to shape history instruction. In P. Stearns, P. Seixas, & S. Wineburg (Eds.), Knowing, teaching, and learning history: National and international perspectives (p. 334). New York: New York University Press.

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A Convict Story: interactive teaching resource - Sydney Living Museums - Historic Houses Trust of NSW

A Convict Story: interactive teaching resource - Sydney Living Museums - Historic Houses Trust of NSW | Changes to People and Places in the Sydney Region as a result of the British Colonisation | Scoop.it
Sydney Living Museums, the public identity of the Historic Houses Trust of NSW, brings 12 major heritage sites alive through exhibitions, publications, events, and education.
Ryan Tleis's insight:

This website can be seen as an engaging teaching resource for both teachers and for students to take part in. The resource was created by the Historic Houses of Trust of New South Wales in partnership with the NSW Curriculum and Learning Innovation Centre. Many of the tasks in this resource would enhance a class visit to the Hyde Park Barracks Museum or the Museum of Sydney and enrich student learning.  Students get the opportunity try on convict clothes, lie in a hammock and explore the Hyde Park Barracks while students uncover a convict identity and what life was like being a convict at the time of colonisation.  Students also get to put themselves in the convicts shoes and work- where they get to make and lay bricks and other craft activities. There are many interactive links students can explore, by just simply clicking onto it. Once you have clicked onto the link, it provides teachers and students with a range of topics to explore each with specific information, activities and great teaching notes to help teachers implement it in the classroom.

 

When clicking onto the link of ‘Life at the Barracks’ students learn and explore the layout of the Barracks which also shows you a drawing of the building inside, learn about what life would have been like for a convict, Learn more about convict rations and how food was prepared showing an artefact image for students,  students explore the rules, discipline and hard, monotonous work for the convicts due to being governed and finally learn about the punishment  at the barracks . For this section of the resource, activities include; students writing a diary entry imaging themselves as a convict living at Hyde Park Barracks, where they are assigned to kitchen duties. Students include illustrations, comments and feelings about their situation. Students can talk about the food was like, the living conditions, etc.

 

Board of Studies (2007) Students “Obtain information from selected Internet/ computer sites and other computer graphics and texts

 

This resource provides teacher with great ideas to use with their students and also allows students to explore the interactions as a convict, where they discover and experience their life and working conditions during the British colonisation

 

 

 References:

 

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007), English K--6 syllabus, Board of Studies NSW, Sydney

 

Historic Houses Trust of NSW (n.d). A Convict Story. Retrieved March 23rd , 2013 from http://www.hht.net.au/discover/highlights/articles/a_convict_story_interactive_teaching_resource#journeys ;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Brief Aboriginal History

A Brief Aboriginal History | Changes to People and Places in the Sydney Region as a result of the British Colonisation | Scoop.it
Ryan Tleis's insight:

The website “Aboriginal Herritage” is a great resource for both teachers and students in learning about the ‘Aboriginal History’. The website focuses on the History of the Guringai People who lived in Newcastle through the Southern and Northern Shore of Sydney and learns about the many changes they faced in their environment that lead to many issues.

The site gives teachers and students an insight about the lifestyle of the Guringai people, where we learn about the Guringai Peoples connection to land and how important it was for them to keep that kinship with the natural environment. The resource enables students to explore the consequences the Guringai people faced due to the changes of the natural environment, rituals and lifestyle. In the website it talks about how the Guringai people faced  food shortages due to the large white population washing out the fish by netting huge catches, reduced the kangaroo population with unsustainable hunting, cleared the land, and polluted the water. As a result, the Aboriginal people throughout the Sydney area were soon close to starvation. Through reading this students learn that due to the change of environment for the Aboriginal People- as a result of the British Arrival taking away all the animals, polluting the water and clearing the land (taking away all the crops) starvation was faced by the Guringai People. The great thing about this website also is that it provides stduents with a link based on Sacred Sites of the Aboriginal People- which also includes a Video showing the viewers the Sites and what they represent and mean to the Aboriginal People. This allows stduents to understand the importance of Kinship to the land and natural environment.

 

A teaching Idea may include inviting a guest speaker from the Aboriginal education consultant (government schools) or local Aboriginal Land Council, families of Aboriginal students, Aboriginal education workers, local Aboriginal Education Consultative Group (AECG) to come into the classroom and to share their history,  lifestyle of their culture and their kinship to the natural environment.

A literacy activity teachers can incoporate in the classroom involves getting stduents to write a Diary Entry or a Recount  reflecting on themselves where they are to go back in time in the of the British Arrival where students have a choice to be an Aboriginal Person or a Person who was affected during that time. In their Entries where they are to talk about their experiences they faced as a result of the British Arrival, where they are to talk about their feelings and changes to their lifestyle and environment. This activity allows students to analyse what they have learned and understood about the Guringai People lifestyle and kinship of the environment and how important it was for the Guringai people. Students are to describe how it affected them and the consequences that resulted due to the change. Thus, students are putting themselves in the Guringa Peoples shoes and imagine themselves experiencing what the Guringai People experiences as a result to the British Arrival. Give students the choice to happily share their written work to their calssroom peers

This activity, as Marsh (2008) highlights, “enables students to travel vicariously to other times and places. They add important dimensions to student learning and, in the process, provide further opportunities for students to develop listening, speaking, writing and reading skills” (p.34).

 

 

References

Aboriginal Heritage (2006). Aboriginal Heritage. Retrieved April 3rd, 2013 from http://www.aboriginalheritage.org/history/history/ ;

 

Marsh, C. (2008). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. 4th Ed, Frenchs Forrest: Pearson Education Australia.

 

 

 

 

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