Change and Continuity
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Change and Continuity
Outcome: CCES1 Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others.
Subject Matter: Family origins, including country of origin
Curated by Lauren Duncan
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Harmony Day: Multicultural Match

Harmony Day: Multicultural Match | Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Lauren Duncan's insight:

This interactive website gives students the opportunity to learn about significant artefacts from countries around the world, including engaging in a memory game. The resource could be used as a means of sharing events or stories related to traditional practices, dress or forms of expression, such as music. It is important to note that prior to the lesson, the teacher will need to request each child bring in an item from home that is significant to their familial or national heritage. Students will take turns playing the game by selecting two cards to be flipped over on an Interactive Whiteboard. When a child finds a match, the teacher will pause to discuss the cultural artefact with students, using the information regarding its cultural heritage provided by the website. The class will then participate in a show and tell, in which each student will be given an opportunity to verbally explain their artefact (e.g. country of origin, what was it used for in the past and is it still used today, or a physical description). This strategy of oral literacy is corroborated by Hoepper (2011), who argues that through hearing the stories of other students’ lives and examining artefacts such as photographs and objects, “students also recognise that people have different histories” (p. 212).

 

As an extension of this activity, artefacts will be left at the front of the room for the class to observe and handle with teacher assistance. The class will then work together to create an approximate chronological timeline of their artefacts, with the teacher encouraging students to use words and phrases associated with the passage of time (e.g. before, after, years ago, etc). Once an order has been established, students will be assessed on their ability to use correct language, their contribution to the decision making process, as well as their justifications of why certain artefacts belong in certain points along the timeline. By doing so, Hoepper (2011) theorises that student will begin to “distinguish between past and present ways of living” (p. 212), and forge a deeper understanding of change and continuty over time.

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Hello! In 30 Different Languages

Lauren Duncan's insight:

In this video, students are provided with the symbolic, written and oral representation of the word ‘hello’ in thirty different languages from around the world. Such a resource can be used by students to explore their peers’ family origins and countries of origin through the diversity of native languages readily available in the classroom. The impact of using an ICT resource itself represents the changes to social and cultural practices in the ways we communicate with children in a twenty-first century setting. According to Winch et al. (2010), while the screen may be one-dimensional, it “provides interactivity in exciting and interesting ways” (p. 400) through a combination of voice, video, music, visual and written text that develops multiliteracy skills. When incorporating this resource into the classroom, it is important for a teacher to consider how these emerging technologies can blend with traditional methods to influence and enhance students’ writing and learning.

 

Students will watch the video, followed by a class discussion in which the teacher will inquire whether any students speak another language outside of school. For example, if students speak another language at home with parents (e.g. first language) or if students speak another language in a religious context (e.g. speaking Latin in prayers and hymns). Students will then be allocated one of the languages from the video and paired in order to teach and practice this language with a peer. In instances where a child is proficient in a language other than English, the pairing may practice an appropriate phrase to share with the whole class. As a form of assessment, students will write out ‘hello’ in their allocated language, and contribute to the creation of a class welcome poster. This poster collage should then be displayed for students and visitors to see, which affirms Ewing’s (2013) belief that “creative efforts need to be acknowledged and respected” (p. 97).

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National Geographic: MapMaker Interactive

National Geographic: MapMaker Interactive | Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Lauren Duncan's insight:

This interactive mapmaker from National Geographic allows students to create their own geographical tour of the world by organising personal, national and global information into a set of links, which they can then share amongst themselves or with others. Such a tool could be used by teachers to visually represent students’ countries of origin, as well as where they and their families live today. To achieve this, each student is assigned a marker (found on the left-hand toolbar), and using an Interactive Whiteboard, drags and drops their icon onto the map. Images and information from the internet or personal sources may be added to each marker using the link button, in which students can share significant events or stories about family members, religious practices, cultural traditions, etc. A final class map should include two markers per student, either across two countries or both within Australia.

This teaching idea could also hold potential links to numeracy. According to Cranby and Matthews (2011), geographical thinking requires a two-pronged approach when presenting information. That is, the selection of data to be presented and the format in which this data is to be presented (Cranby and Matthews, 2011, p. 272). Here, students could use the information gathered from their class map to create two column graphs, one representing the number of parents born in Australia or other countries around the world, and the other representing the number of students born in Australia or other countries around the world. In doing so, students should begin to see relationships between their own heritage and the heritages of their peers, as well as any clear patterns of change or continuity in regards to where global citizens choose to reside today. As a final assessment, students respond to a question or make a relevant observation, which should demonstrate the student has drawn some meaning from the collated data.

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Family Tree

Family Tree | Change and Continuity | Scoop.it
Lauren Duncan's insight:

This website provides students with literacy activities, including an interactive game for learning about family trees. This resource links to the allocated subject matter by directly exploring students’ family origins, specifically the diversity of familial structures across time. According to Cooper (2002), recent research shows that young children are capable of “quite sophisticated understanding of the concepts … if the context and questions are meaningful to them” (p. 42). That is, if the learning experience somehow incorporates life events or knowledge specific to the individual, they will be more likely to engage abstract concepts like cross-generational change or continuity. When introducing this resource, the whole class will play rounds of the game to learn how we interpret visual organisers. This will familiarise students with the features of a family tree, as well as provide opportunity for discussion, such as why older generations appear to have a larger number of children, whilst newer generations will generally have fewer.

 

Using a prepared template of a family tree, the teacher will then select a student example and model their family tree for the class. As an introductory session, this example should limit its scope to a maximum of three generations (i.e. child and any siblings, parents and any siblings, grandparents and any siblings). Students will then use the given template to create their own family trees by naming, identifying the familial relationship (e.g. sister, uncle, etc.), and drawing accompanying images of family members. This illustrative link to visual arts in conjunction with written text is advocated by Ewing (2011), who argues that art is seen as a language system, “a way of communicating as a means other than verbal, and as such, invites understanding of cultural change and difference” (p. 131). Assessment will involve questioning by asking students to demonstrate the generational flow of their family tree to ascertain understanding of its conventions.

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Dreamtime Stories: Tiddalick The Frog

Lauren Duncan's insight:

This animated short from the 2011 Marambul Yuganha Exhibition retells the Aboriginal Dreamtime story of Tiddalick the Frog, who consumed all moisture from the land before releasing it back in the form of the rivers, lakes and swamps we know today. The video can be used to introduce an Indigenous perspective on the origin of country, as it depicts unique images of landscape, animals and Aboriginal beliefs that help to enrich a shared Australian heritage. However, it is important to note that prior to any public showing of this story, “consultation with Aborigines is essential, as is the heeding of their advice” (Lippmann, 1978, p. 227) to ensure the material does not disclose any potentially secret or sacred information pertaining to the Murray River Region where Tiddalick the Frog originates. As a reflection of this, a local member of the Indigenous community would be invited to visit the class and retell Tiddalick the Frog in their own words, after which they and the teacher build on the experience by helping children develop their contemporary versions of the tale.

 

According to Winch et al. (2010), “the stories about the Dreaming are stories about the beginning of things” (p. 520), and explain how an aspect of the country first came into being. Students will therefore compose a class narrative that recounts how a part of their local community began. For example, how their school got its house colours, why some people use cars and some people use public transport, or how streets got their name. As a final assessment, students will each storyboard an assigned scene from their class tale, which will also demonstrate the change in modality from oral storytelling to pictorial representations. The overall learning experience holds direct links to literacy, as students engage in the production of their own story, including the narrative features of character, sequence of events and accompanying visual prompts.

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