Cell culture, tissue engineering
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Bone tissue engineering by using a combination of polymer/Bioglass composites with human adipose-derived stem cells - Online First - Springer

Bone tissue engineering by using a combination of polymer/Bioglass composites with human adipose-derived stem cells - Online First - Springer | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
Bone tissue engineering by using a combination of polymer/Bioglass composites with human adipose-derived stem cells http://t.co/zXz8FULuT9
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Applications of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering

Applications of Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
The engineering and life science principles that help in improving biological substitutes to maintain and develop tissue function constitute tissue engineering (TE).
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Predicting the Fate of Stem Cells - Science Daily (press release)

Predicting the Fate of Stem Cells - Science Daily (press release) | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
Predicting the Fate of Stem Cells Science Daily (press release) "The work allows for a better understanding of how to turn stem cells into clinically useful cell types more efficiently," said Emanuel Nazareth, a PhD student at U of T's Institute of...
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Universidade do Minho: Biomimetic surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability properties for tissue engineering applications

Universidade do Minho: Biomimetic surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability properties for tissue engineering applications | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
Biomimetic surfaces exhibiting extreme wettability properties for tissue engineering applications http://t.co/it3fXtuAnZ
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Penn: Protein That Protects Nucleus Also Regulates Stem Cell Differentiation

Penn: Protein That Protects Nucleus Also Regulates Stem Cell Differentiation | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it

The human body has hundreds of different cell types, all with the same basic DNA, and all of which can ultimately be traced back to identical stem cells. Despite this fundamental similarity, a bone cell has little in common with a brain cell when it comes to appearance or function. The fact that bone is rigid and mechanically distinct from soft fat or brain had been speculated to play some role in differentiation to new cells in those parts of the body, but mechanisms have been unclear.

Now, a study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that a protein found in the nuclei of all cells — lamin-A — plays a key role in the differentiation process.


Via Jacob Blumenthal
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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, September 3, 2013 3:31 PM

A new study, published in Science magazine,  describes a new role for lamin-A protein in the differentiation process of stem cells. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found that levels of lamin-A varied between cell types of both human and mose tissues. For example, cells derived from bone, contain 30 times higher levels of lamin-A, as compared to cells derived from the brain. They also showed that  higher levels of lamin-A were correlated with greater protection of DNA and with added rigidity. Interestingly, when they silenced lamin-A by RNA interference in differentiating stem cells, they were able to repress or to alter the differentiation process.

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/341/6149/1240104.full


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To learn more about the lamin-A gene, LMNA:

http://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=LMNA&search=LAMIN


Explore lamin-A related diseases:

http://www.malacards.org/search/by_symbol/LMNA

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An Organized Approach to 3D Tissue Engineering - Innovation Toronto

An Organized Approach to 3D Tissue Engineering - Innovation Toronto | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
IBN’s novel technique brings researchers closer to viable organ implants Researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) have developed a simple method of organizing cells and their microenvironments in hydrogel fibers.
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TGF-β-releasing scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering | Tissue Engineering Part B: Reviews


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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, July 29, 2013 2:53 PM

Abstract: "The maintenance of a critical threshold concentration of TGF-β for a given period of time is crucial for the onset and maintenance of chondrogenesis. Thus, the development of scaffolds that provide temporal and/or spatial control of TGF-β bioavailability has appeal as a mechanism to induce the chondrogenesis of stem cells in vitro and in vivo for articular cartilage repair. In the past decade, many types of scaffolds have been designed to advance this goal: hydrogels based on polysaccharides, hyaluronic acid, alginate; protein-based hydrogels such as fibrin, gelatin, collagens; biopolymeric gels and synthetic polymers; and solid and hybrid composite (hydrogel/solid) scaffolds. Here, we review the progress in developing strategies to deliver TGF-β from scaffolds with the aim of enhancing chondrogenesis. In the future, such scaffolds could prove critical for tissue engineering cartilage, both in vitro and in vivo".

-----------------Commercial Section-------------------

To learn more about chondrogenic differentiation products:

http://bioreagents.lifemapsc.com/collections/differentiation-kits

http://bioreagents.lifemapsc.com/collections/purestem-packages

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Cell Stem Cell - Reprogramming Fibroblasts into Bipotential Hepatic Stem Cells by Defined Factors

Cell Stem Cell - Reprogramming Fibroblasts into Bipotential Hepatic Stem Cells by Defined Factors | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it

In a paper, publish in Cell Stem Cell, chinese researchers demonstrated a direct differentiation technique of fibroblasts into hepatic-like stem cells. The reserachers tranduced Hnf1β and Foxa3, liver organogenesis transcription factors, into mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. The indiced hepatic stem cells can be stably expanded in vitro and possess the potential of bidirectional differentiation into both hepatocytic and cholangiocytic lineages. Their differentiation potentila was examined in-vivo by tranplantation of the induced hepatic stem cells into the injured liver of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah)-deficient mice,where they differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells, and into bile ducts of mice with DDC-induced bile ductular injury, where they formed cholangiocytes.

News release: http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/health/2013-07/19/c_125037433.htm

Paper: http://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/abstract/S1934-5909(13)00275-0

 


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NIST Announces New Scaffold Reference Material for Tissue Engineering Research

NIST Announces New Scaffold Reference Material for Tissue Engineering Research | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
NIST Announces New Scaffold Reference Material for Tissue Engineering Research (NIST...What do you think about tissue engineering research http://t.co/NpsaHuumdR #medicalresearch #tissue)...
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Une équipe de la Faculté de médecine a mis au point un modèle de ... - Fil des événements

Une équipe de la Faculté de médecine a mis au point un modèle de ... - Fil des événements | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
Fil des événements
Une équipe de la Faculté de médecine a mis au point un modèle de ...

Via Valérie Cenizo
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Valérie Cenizo's curator insight, June 29, 2013 1:02 PM

Décidément plus qu'utiles ces modèles de peau! 

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NIH taps bioprinting to create better tissue models for research

NIH taps bioprinting to create better tissue models for research | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
The NIH's National Eye Institute and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences have partnered with Organovo to design tissue models for clinical applications.
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Scientists make lung cells from human stem cells

Scientists make lung cells from human stem cells | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it

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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, December 3, 2013 2:31 PM

Researchers from the  Columbia University Medical Center, published a new paper in Nature Bitechnology, describing a novel method for generation of functional lung cells from pluripotent stem cells. Their highly-efficient differentiation method resulted in the formation of clara, ciliated, type I and type II alveolar epithelial cells.

A link to the paper:

 http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nbt.2754.html

 

To learn about the embryonic development of the lung and realted stem cell protocols: 

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/in-vivo-development/lung

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3D Printer Uses Microscopic Water Droplets That May Be Used For Tissue Engineering and Wound Healing | Bioprinting World

3D Printer Uses Microscopic Water Droplets That May Be Used For Tissue Engineering and Wound Healing | Bioprinting World | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
http://t.co/2tg3EqOzPA http://t.co/CFNpOqWWPg
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Reprogramming Fibroblasts into Bipotential Hepatic Stem Cells by Defined Factors

Reprogramming Fibroblasts into Bipotential Hepatic Stem Cells by Defined Factors | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
Fibroblasts reprogrammed into induced hepatic #stemcells. Useful for disease modeling and tissue engineering. http://t.co/8YqtYKH711
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A hierarchical approach to 3D tissue engineering with preformed blood-vessel tissue | KurzweilAI

A hierarchical approach to 3D tissue engineering with preformed blood-vessel tissue | KurzweilAI | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
Schematic diagram illustrating the concept of a prevascularized hydrogel.
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Universidade do Minho: Chitosan scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid for cartilage tissue engineering

Universidade do Minho: Chitosan scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid for cartilage tissue engineering | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
RT @repositorium: Chitosan scaffolds containing hyaluronic acid for cartilage tissue engineering http://t.co/QW5XdiT9
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New 3D Hair Follicle Model Could Help Find Drugs that Treat Baldness

New 3D Hair Follicle Model Could Help Find Drugs that Treat Baldness | Cell culture, tissue engineering | Scoop.it
Current medical treatments for baldness stop hair loss, but don't help new hair grow. A new 3D follicle model engineered by The Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) can help researchers design effective treatment for re-growing hair.
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3DCellCulture: Search Results

3dCellCulture.com is the complete collection of 3D cell culture publications and information.
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New Tissue Engineering Breakthrough Encourages Nerve Repair - ScienceDaily news


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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, July 9, 2013 5:50 AM

A new combination of tissue engineering techniques could reduce the need for nerve grafts, according to new research by The Open University. Regeneration of nerves is challenging when the damaged area is extensive, and surgeons currently have to take a nerve graft from elsewhere in the body, leaving a second site of damage. Nerve grafts contain aligned tissue structures and Schwann cells that support and guide neuron growth through the damaged area, encouraging function to be restored.