Celebrations (Stage 1 HSIE)
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Celebrations

Celebrations | Celebrations (Stage 1 HSIE) | Scoop.it

"This collection explores celebrations in Australia, Asia and Europe. It considers the beliefs, rituals and foods associated with popular celebrations and includes a selection of archival resources that show how celebrations are observed around the world."

Kylie Walsh's insight:

This Scoop It topic provides resources for a Stage 1 HSIE Cultures unit of work regarding Celebrations. This site provides a range of resources and teaching ideas covering a number of various family, community and religious celebrations.

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This resource is a collection of videos and slide presentations that can be used in Stage 1 for a topic on celebrations. Some of the movies are a little dated but they do show various ways that different families and communities celebrate a number of different events in a variety of religions and cultures including:

 

- Celebrating a New Baby

- First Birthday: Vietnamese traditions

- Celebrating Name Days: Greek traditions

- Celebrating a Baby’s Baptism: Catholic traditions

- The Feast of Rosh Hashanah: Jewish traditions

- The Tashlikh Ceremony: Jewish traditions

- Ramadan: Muslim traditions

- Diwali, the Festival of Lights: Hindu traditions

- Moon Festival: Chinese traditions

- Bastille Day: French traditions

 

The teacher will need to use discretion as to which films to show to which grade in the Stage. Some videos like Celebrating a New Baby and First Birthday would be more appropriate for Year 1 whilst The Feast of Rosh Hashanah may be more beneficial for Year 2 due to the more in depth nature of the video. The Bush Christmas and Christmas in 1861 videos are not as useful in this topic as the depiction of Christmas celebrations are not current and students in Stage 1 could find it difficult to relate to.

 

Activity: 

One of the challenges for lower primary students is to take on meaning from celebrations and traditions they are unfamiliar with. Biesta & Miedemac (2002, p. 180) suggest the only way to make social or cultural meaning is through participation and that through this process students can transform information.  Due to the nature of this subject matter being heavily reliant on social and cultural meaning a particularly useful activity in the classroom would be to invite parents or local communities to share their celebrations, as much as possible, whilst respecting religious and cultural boundaries. This could include having mini or mock celebrations including the food, clothing, music and art to immerse the children in the celebration and enable them to achieve an “exchange of meaning” through communication and not just a “transportation of information” (Biesta & Miedemac (2002, p. 119). This will help the students consolidate their understanding of the true meaning of the celebration.

 

References:

Biesta, G.J.J. & Miedemac, S. (2002). Instruction or pedagogy? The need for a transformative conception of education. Teaching and Teacher Education, 18, pp. 173–181.

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Diwali: Festival of Lights

Diwali: Festival of Lights | Celebrations (Stage 1 HSIE) | Scoop.it

"In India, one of the most significant festivals is Diwali, or the Festival of Lights. It's a five-day celebration that includes good food, fireworks, colored sand, and special candles and lamps."

Kylie Walsh's insight:

This resources is a short 3 minute video which can be used by the teacher to introduce Diwali, Festival of Lights, to the students in the topic of celebrations for Stage 1 HSIE. This video can be used as a comparison to other celebrations like Christmas, Birthdays and New Year’s Eve as it clearly highlights several key components of celebrations including: visiting the temple with family; decorating the home; sharing food; dressing in new clothes; light displays; and fireworks.

 

The article linked to the video, http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/explore/diwali/ , can be used by the teacher to further explain elements of Diwali to students along with calling upon students who celebrate Diwali to provide input from personal experiences.

 

Activity 1:

The teacher could create a retrieval chart to use with the students in a group format to compare the celebrations in this video to those of other known celebrations with respect to food, clothing, music and decorations. This process will highlight for the students the commonalties in celebrations across cultures, religions and communities as required in CUS1.4 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p. 48).

 

Activity 2:

The teacher could then expand on this by choosing one element of the Diwali festival to further explore such as the decorations created at the front door of home, called rangoli. The teacher could have the students view images of the ranogli and then ask them to draw or paint their own version using the principal of symmetry from the Two-Dimensional Space 2 outcome in Mathematics Syllabus K-10 (Board of Studies NSW, 2012). This use of Creative Arts and Mathematics outcomes within a HSIE unit allows for increased instructional efficiency by yielding “desired outcomes while using no more time, effort or resources than necessary” (Konrad, Helf & Joseph, 2011, p. 69).

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). Mathematics K-10 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Societies and its Environments K-6. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW

 

Konrad, M., Helf, S., & Joseph, L. (2011). Evidence-based instruction is not enough: Strategies for increasing instructional efficiency. Intervention in School and Clinic, 47(2), 67-74.

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Anzac Day

Anzac Day | Celebrations (Stage 1 HSIE) | Scoop.it
As you saw earlier, Anzac day commemorations were held on Friday. And on that day we were lucky enough to meet a young Aussie with a very special connection to it. His name is Anzac. Here's his story. But first, a warning to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers, this story contains images of people who've died.
Kylie Walsh's insight:

This is great resource to use in Stage 1 Cultures to introduce the concept of commemoration as a type of celebration. This video produced by the ABC on Behind the News is a segment on ANZAC Day told from the perspective of a boy called Anzac, whose ancestors fought at Gallipoli in the First World War. The video includes a brief introduction to what ANZAC Day means and there are images of commemoration as represented by the war medals, Dawn Service, The Last Post and Anzac Day March. The level of information and the depth the program goes into regarding war is appropriate for Stage 1 students.

 

Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Selection Criteria:

The segment is presented in narration from the perspective of Anzac who is Aboriginal. The selection of this resource with an Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander perspective satisfies Craven’s (2015) criteria as it is: recently produced and does not include generalisations; the production is balanced; it is entirely from the perspective of an Aboriginal child; appropriate warnings are made regarding deceased people; and there is no sacred content included.

 

Activity

The teacher could use this video at the start of a subsection of a unit of work in celebrations to focus on commemoration and what it means. The students could work in groups and choose one of the customs used in the video as well as other traditional customs to explore further in their groups. The teacher will need to provide guidance to appropriate resources either online or in the library. The children will research what the custom is and how or what they commemorate for example, war medals, Dawn Service and wearing rosemary. The students could then choose a way to present this information to the class.

 

Additional resource:

https://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/customs/

 

References:

Craven, R. (2015). Selection Criteria: Aboriginal Cultural Studies and Aboriginal perspectives across the curriculum.

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Easter Symbols

Easter Symbols | Celebrations (Stage 1 HSIE) | Scoop.it
We thought we'd take a closer look at the way Australians celebrate this holiday. For some people it's an important religious celebration for others it's about chocolate eggs and the Easter bunny. Tash explains some of the meanings behind the traditions.
Kylie Walsh's insight:

This video resource can be used by a teacher as a good introduction to the symbolism of Easter for Stage 1 HSIE students within a celebrations topic.  The main focus of the video is the symbolism of the egg, bunny and hot cross bun in relation to the celebration of Easter.

 

Activity:

As all students have a four day weekend the teacher could have the students write a story or journal about their Easter break: how they celebrated and what they did. Adaption with respect to choice of activity may be required for some students to enable them to participate fully, for example, allowing the use of technology or creative representations of their weekend. Then teacher could then have a class discussion and collate a list of the different ways that students celebrated their Easter long weekend. This will highlight to the students how the way in which we celebrate is similar to some students and different to others. This could then lead on to further cultural diversity work.

 

Assessment:

The writing task can be used as a formative assessment task to assess the children’s writing after the holiday break. Formative assessment is used to “assist student learning through feedback” (Gilbert, 2014, p. 98). The benefit of this style of assessment, particularly for Stage 1 children, is that they are provide with a safe environment to learn from mistakes and encourage to continue developing their writing and expression skills which is a key skill, EN1-11D , as outlined in the English K-10 syllabus (Board of Studies NSW, 2012).

 

Additional Resource:

This is a good resource for teachers to use with respect to their own edification for those not familiar with the origins, religious observance and traditions of Easter, http://www.australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/easter-in-australia.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). English K-10 syllabus. Sydney: NSW Board of Studies.

 

Gilbert, R. (2014). Assessment for Student Learning. In Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences. History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. Fifth Edition. Melbourne: Cengage.

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Chinese New Year: Year of the Sheep

Chinese New Year: Year of the Sheep | Celebrations (Stage 1 HSIE) | Scoop.it

"Introduce pupils to the differences and similarities between the lives, languages and cultures of people in China and the UK with the Year of the Sheep education pack."

Kylie Walsh's insight:

This resource is and education pack produced by the British Council for the Chinese New Year celebration for the Year of the Sheep. This pack is a good resources for use in Stage 1 in a unit of work about celebrations. Whilst the pack was designed for the Year of the Sheep there are several activities that can be used every year including: making a Chinese lantern; the Story of the New Year Race and Shadow Puppet templates. Linking this celebrations topic with Stage 1 Outcomes in the Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus  (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, pp. 20-21) is a useful strategy to teach across curriculums.

 

Activity:

Utilising the sequencing the New Year Race story cut outs is a worthwhile comprehension activity linked to outcome EN1-4A in the English K-10 Syllabus (Board of Studies, 2012). This task would be completed after the teacher reads the story included in the pack. Depending on the students reading ability some adaption may need to be made to this activity. The teacher could create different sequencing sentences based on literacy levels and could include pictures as well to ensure the creation of an activity that is Universally Designed for Learning (Evans, 2015, p. 110).

 

Extending on from the New Year celebration unit teachers can further use this resource to teach about cultural diversity using the lesson plans entitled a day in a Chinese Primary School  and counting and playground games. Though this program was developed in the UK the comparison between China and Australian schools is equally valid and useful, the resource only mentions UK schools briefly in the lesson plan and this could be easily changed to Australia without altering the meaning.

 

Additional Resources:

This is an interactive video that children could use during some computer time individually or in small groups. http://learnenglishkids.britishcouncil.org/en/short-stories/my-favourite-day-chinese-new-year

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). English K-10 syllabus. Sydney: NSW Board of Studies.

 

Evans, D. (2015). Curriculum adaptations. In A. Ashman (Ed.), Education for inclusion and diversity (5th ed.) (pp. 103-128). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson.

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