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Virtual Tour - Washington State University

Virtual Tour - Washington State University | CE class | Scoop.it
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Virtual tour of Washington State University on wsu.edu

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Western Washington University

Western Washington University | CE class | Scoop.it
Information on Western Washington University admissions chances, scholarships, reviews, and stats.
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Some ideas when thinking about the pros and cons of Western Washington University

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36 Questions to Ask on a College Visit

36 Questions to Ask on a College Visit | CE class | Scoop.it
When touring campuses, take your time and be inquisitive.
Bill Bill's insight:

Here are good ideas of what to ask my college student interviewee.

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Factors Influencing College Graduation via Education Week

Factors Influencing College Graduation via Education Week | CE class | Scoop.it

- Gender - Gender is a factor in graduation rates, and the gap in completion has widened in the past decade. Now, 43.8 percent of women earn a degree after four years, compared to 32.9 percent of men. The largest gender gaps are at public four-year colleges, where 45.3 percent of men vs. 52.7 percent of women complete.

 

-Private vs. Public - Students at private schools have better graduation rates compared with those at public schools, but they also tend to be more academically prepared.

 

- First-generation college students who often struggle more to complete are more likely to attend a public college. After four years, 27.4 percent of first-generation college students earn a degree, while students whose parents have college degrees have a graduation rate of 42.1 percent.

 

- Race is a factor. Asian-Americans had the highest four-year graduation rates at 44.9 percent, followed by whites, 42.6 percent; Latinos, 25.8 percent; African-Americans, 21 percent; and American Indians, 16.8 percent.

 

Factors positively associated with completion revealed in the report:

 

-Living on campus the first year of college.

 

-Selecting a college because of early action or early decision admittance.

 

-Deciding on a college because of overall cost of attending.

 

-Choosing a school based on size.

 

-Starting college with experience using the Internet for research.

 

-Visiting the college campus before enrolling.

 

-Expecting to participate in student clubs.

 

-Enjoying a strong sense of emotional health.

 

-Possessing a strong desire to achieve.

 

-Being open to changing one's career.

 

-Devoting more hours a week in high school studying.

 

-Choosing a college to attend based on it being near home

 

-Performing volunteer work in high school.

 

-Going to college to gain a general education.

 

-Choosing a college based on the importance of its graduates getting good jobs.

 

 

 

 


Via Mel Riddile
Bill Bill's insight:

Although I fit the negative demographic for almost every factor that influences college graduation, I will be amongst the minority that fit these disadvantageous traits who graduate college in 4 years by following the factors positively associated with college completion listed.

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Know a New College Graduate? Great Career Tips to Pass On

Know a New College Graduate? Great Career Tips to Pass On | CE class | Scoop.it

The cap and gown are ready to go. How about the career plan? I've had well over a dozen e-mails from parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles the last few days asking me what advice I would give a new graduate facing the job world today.


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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Perhaps the most essential question to ask oneself while getting ready for college is the question regarding life beyond college. Many people fail to graduate with a plan of what to do in life with the degree they have received, or they have a plan that is difficult to achieve and fail to have a backup plan ready in case their first plan cannot commence immediately following graduation. This is the reason for unemployment being so rampant amongst "newlygrads".

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Schools can now track FAFSA submissions and completions! Federal Student Aid - Data Center - FAFSA Completion

Schools can now track FAFSA submissions and completions! Federal Student Aid - Data Center - FAFSA Completion | CE class | Scoop.it

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT LAUNCHES NEW DATA TOOL TO HELP HIGH SCHOOL OFFICIALS INCREASE FAFSA COMPLETION AND COLLEGE ACCESSIBILITY

 

The U.S. Department of Education has released a new tool that will help high school counselors and school leaders by giving them a resource to monitor FAFSA completions and better help students access higher education.

 

School officials can now track FAFSA submission and completion statistics at individual high schools on the FAFSA Completion website, which will help them ensure that their students are filling out the FAFSA and therefore are able to determine their eligibility for federal student aid – a key factor in families’ college decisions.


Via Mel Riddile
Bill Bill's insight:

Not only is the FAFSA application process made incredibly simple and straight-forward, high school counselors can now track their students' FAFSA application completion.

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GEAR UP NC's curator insight, June 24, 2013 11:19 AM
Check out your school's FAFSA completion rates! #GEARUPworks
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(EN) - U.S. Higher Education Glossary | usnews.com

(EN) - U.S. Higher Education Glossary | usnews.com | CE class | Scoop.it

"What's the difference between a college and a university? Who are undergraduate students versus graduate students? What's the FAFSA? Studying in the United States can be confusing if you don't fully understand the words used in U.S. higher education. With that in mind, U.S. News has compiled a glossary of important terms specifically for international students and parents. While this list is not exhaustive, it offers a key starting point as you ..."


Via Stefano KaliFire
Bill Bill's insight:

It is important to consider the questions asked at the beginning of this article, most important of which knowing what FAFSA , because the most important thing to consider when going to college is its cost and whether you will be able to afford where you want to go. FAFSA makes college affordable and therefore achievable for millions of students a year.

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How to Choose a College

How to Choose a College | CE class | Scoop.it
When picking a school, you can focus on ranking, reputation, ivy. Or you can ask yourself where you’ll really be forced to grow.

Via ACS Counselors
Bill Bill's insight:

When picking a college, it is important to ask questions such as what you are expecting to get out of the school. 

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ACS Counselors's curator insight, January 10, 2013 2:18 AM

Go beyond the usual questions and dig deep when looking at colleges.  Too many times we refer to US News & World Report or our own assumptions when narrowing down possible locations for high education.

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Resources | Federal Student Aid

Federal Student Aid provides publications, online tools, videos, and other resources to help you prepare and pay for college or career school.
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Step-by-step instructions on how to apply for FAFSA

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10 Scholarships You Can Apply for Now

10 Scholarships You Can Apply for Now | CE class | Scoop.it
The school year may be over, but the scholarship search is not.
Bill Bill's insight:

Scholarships should be sought at all times, even after high school ends.

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Debt, no degree: Bills mount for ex-college students who never reached the finish line | U.S. News on NBCNews.com

Debt, no degree: Bills mount for ex-college students who never reached the finish line | U.S. News on NBCNews.com | CE class | Scoop.it

This past April, facing the prospect of three 20-page papers due in the same week, Indiana University East student Harmony Glenn had a panic attack in the school library.

 

“I couldn’t breathe, and my chest felt tight,” she said. “I was asking myself, ‘Do I push forward…or do I cut my losses?’”

 

Glenn, 27, had been inching toward a bachelor’s degree since 2004, transferring schools and taking breaks from her studies to switch her major, live with her parents to save money, and later move around Indiana with her husband to chase the best-paying jobs. Lately, she’d been working fulltime as a sales associate for a skin care retailer in an Indianapolis mall, and didn’t have the bandwidth to focus on her schoolwork.

 

The night of her panic attack, she made a decision to leave school. “I just looked at the bills and realized this didn’t make sense anymore,” she said.

 

Her husband, Christopher, 29, had dropped out a couple of years before after getting “burnt out” by both working and studying first at St. Joseph’s, then Ball State University, then Indiana University. He got his EMT certification instead. Together, they have around $40,000 in student loan debt, but no degrees to show for it.

 

“There’s not a day that goes by that we don’t think about it,” said Christopher. “This debt is a huge weight hanging over our heads. We’ve always wanted to purchase real estate, but our debts put a damper on that.”

 

The Glenns are part of a growing population stuck paying down debt for a degree they never got. According to a 2011 study by the Harvard Graduate School of Education, only 56 percent of students who enter four-year programs graduate within six years. That number plunges to 22 percent for for-profit colleges. Meanwhile, the percentage of incoming students relying on loans is growing—from 2001 to 2009, the number increased from 47 percent to 53 percent, according to a report by Education Sector. The same report also found that borrowers who drop out are four times more likely to default on their loans.

 

Some of these dropouts grew up middle class with an expectation of getting a degree, like the Glenns. Others are students from low-income backgrounds, perhaps the first in their families to go to college. Michelle Obama recently launched an effort to encourage these first-timers to pursue higher education, but the odds are stacked against them: Pell grants and funding for state and city universities continue to shrink. Forty percent of students at four-year colleges, and 60 percent at community colleges, are working 20 hours or more to make up for these gaps, according to the Pell Institute.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Bill Bill's insight:

It is one thing to graduate with loads of debt, or drop out with no debt, but the absolute worst case scenario would be to drop out with a huge amount of debt.

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6 Questions To Ask Yourself When Choosing a College

6 Questions To Ask Yourself When Choosing a College | CE class | Scoop.it

Choosing a college requires academic, professional, and personal considerations. However, some prospective students focus too much on a single aspect of college life, to the exclusion of other interrelated (and important!


Via Thomas Faltin
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A college applicant should not focus on individual aspects of a college but should consider academic, professional and personal aspects equally to ensure getting the most out of college.

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Vanessa Melo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:50 PM

cis 120 vanessa melo

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15 Big Ways The Internet Is Changing Our Brain | Online College Tips – Online Colleges

15 Big Ways The Internet Is Changing Our Brain | Online College Tips – Online Colleges | CE class | Scoop.it
Scientists have begun to note that the Internet has started to rewire our minds.Read on …...

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Now that we live in the virtual age, online college is now an option. Now a busy, inconsistent life is no excuse to not earn a college degree. 

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Education Loan

Education Loan | CE class | Scoop.it
Students can apply for FAFSA through the online application available on the official website. Students can also apply for Student Federal aid through paper application forms or by calling the official phone.

Via Anagill
Bill Bill's insight:

Lukily for me (as a 2014 FAFSA applicant), the application process is made simple for the convenience of students, therefore there is no reason to not complete the form and receive grants and loans.

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College-Bound: What Every Student with Learning Differences Needs to Know | Littman Krooks, LLP

College-Bound: What Every Student with Learning Differences Needs to Know | Littman Krooks, LLP | CE class | Scoop.it

During this time of year, high school juniors and seniors are hard at work preparing for college entrance exams, writing the perfect admissions essay, touring colleges, and eagerly awaiting decision letters from their institutions of choice. While this can be an exciting, yet stressful time for all students, students with learning differences have another level of factors that they need to take into consideration when choosing the right college. It is important for these students to not only consider the skills necessary to set themselves up for success, but to also be aware of the supports available to them at the colleges where they are considering attending.


Via Lou Salza
Bill Bill's insight:

Although I have no real "learning differences", it is important for me nevertheless to be aware of the supports available to my at the colleges I am considering attending

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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:36 PM

Excerpt:

"...When students are investigating colleges, most take into account the type of campus (e.g., rural vs. urban, size of campus, etc.), the types of degrees and academic programs offered, and living arrangements (e.g., living in housing vs. commuting) when making their final decision. Students with learning differences need to consider these types of factors but also may have additional concerns in terms of access to academic, social engagement, and/or career development supports. Some questions to consider reviewing with the colleges during this decision making process are:

What is the process for obtaining accommodations?Do they offer priority registration to students with disabilities?What types of tutoring are available on campus and for what subjects? How often can students access tutoring and what is the process to receive such services?What kinds of counseling services are available? How does a student access the services?What are the housing options offered (e.g., themed floors, quiet floors, medical single, etc.)?What clubs, events, and activities are offered?What kinds of career services are available?

Finally, sometimes the services that the college has available may not be enough to help assist the student in the transition from high school to college. It is important to also identify outside programs, agencies, and other resources that may be helpful in supporting the students on the road to college success. With the right balance of support students with learning differences can make strides towards success at the post-secondary level and beyond."