CAS-283 Portfolio - Chris B
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Rescooped by Chris Bechtel from CAS-283 Portfolio - Chris B
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Final Project

Chris Bechtel's insight:

My project is based on Sally Adee's article, "Chrome the Conqueror."  This article relates directly to Postman's ideas that with technological innovation there are winners and losers and also the concept that technology changes everything.

 

From Google's early success, it became the clear "winner" of the search engine business.  This in turn, created losers out of all of its competitors.  Rather than stopping there, Google continued to innovate creating competitive products in other markets which in turn created other, larger competitors and ultimately losers as Google continues its winning streak.

 

Postman describes technology as a drop of red dye permeating through water.  In much the same way, Google has permeated everyday life.  As we rely on instantaneous information, our brains begin to function differently.  Before cell phones, people commited phone numbers to memory, but now we enter numbers in our smartphones to be immediately forgotten.  In much the same way, humans might become increasingly dependent on Google to provide answers in our daily lives. Chrome OS advertises that users can be live on Google.com within seven seconds of turning on a tablet device.  In another twenty years, this capability will come in faster.  If all the answers on earth are available in seven seconds or less, who would still make use of their brain?  What will the implications be of never having to commit concepts to memory?

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Scooped by Chris Bechtel
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Final Project

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Chris Bechtel's curator insight, December 11, 2012 10:21 AM

My project is based on Sally Adee's article, "Chrome the Conqueror."  This article relates directly to Postman's ideas that with technological innovation there are winners and losers and also the concept that technology changes everything.

 

From Google's early success, it became the clear "winner" of the search engine business.  This in turn, created losers out of all of its competitors.  Rather than stopping there, Google continued to innovate creating competitive products in other markets which in turn created other, larger competitors and ultimately losers as Google continues its winning streak.

 

Postman describes technology as a drop of red dye permeating through water.  In much the same way, Google has permeated everyday life.  As we rely on instantaneous information, our brains begin to function differently.  Before cell phones, people commited phone numbers to memory, but now we enter numbers in our smartphones to be immediately forgotten.  In much the same way, humans might become increasingly dependent on Google to provide answers in our daily lives. Chrome OS advertises that users can be live on Google.com within seven seconds of turning on a tablet device.  In another twenty years, this capability will come in faster.  If all the answers on earth are available in seven seconds or less, who would still make use of their brain?  What will the implications be of never having to commit concepts to memory?