Careers Today
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Careers Today
Information on tips and skills to be better prepared in searching and finding the ideal fit in the today's workforce environment.
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Research: Becoming a Manager Increases Men’s Job Satisfaction, But Not Women’s

Research: Becoming a Manager Increases Men’s Job Satisfaction, But Not Women’s | Careers Today | Scoop.it
But female managers’ experiences are more complex than that. A number of female managers report that managerial promotions do not make them more satisfied with their jobs. Instead, they describe a host of difficulties that women encounter once promoted to management, such as having their legitimacy contested, their contributions undervalued, and being excluded from powerful networks.

Are these true but isolated instances? Or is it indeed the case that promotions to management have a different impact on the job satisfaction of women and men? The purpose of my recent study was to find the answer.
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Don’t Let Your Inner Fears Limit Your Career

Don’t Let Your Inner Fears Limit Your Career | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Fear is a natural and universal human phenomenon, affecting top executives as much as anyone else. The majority of management literature is focused on helping leaders conquer their fears. The problem is that stifling fear doesn’t make it go away. In fact, failing to address it can lead to highly unproductive and dysfunctional behaviors.
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New Worry For CEOs: A Career-Ending Cyberattack

New Worry For CEOs: A Career-Ending Cyberattack | Careers Today | Scoop.it
The number of U.S. data breaches jumped to a record 791 in the first six months of 2017, according to the nonprofit Identity Theft Resource Center and data security firm CyberScout. That is a 29% jump from the same period last year. At the same time, U.S. CEOs surveyed by KPMG LLP this year on average ranked cybersecurity as their top investment focus over the next three years, up from its second-place spot in last year’s survey.

“This is something a lot of us just didn’t have to worry about five years ago—someone else was handling that,” says Michael Riggs, chief executive of car-hauling company Jack Cooper Holdings Corp. But now, “any CEO who’s not putting this at the top of their priority list is crazy.”
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Another Thing Amazon Is Disrupting: Business-School Recruiting

Another Thing Amazon Is Disrupting: Business-School Recruiting | Careers Today | Scoop.it
All told, Amazon has hired some 1,000 M.B.A.s in the past year, according to Miriam Park, Amazon’s director of university programs—a drop in the bucket for a company that plans to add 50,000 office workers, mainly software developers, in the coming years. But Amazon’s flood-the-zone approach to recruiting and hiring future M.B.A.s—in some cases before they have taken a single business-school course—is feeding the career frenzy on campus and rankling some rival recruiters.

The talent wars begin even before classes do. This past June, Amazon sponsored an event at its Seattle headquarters for 650 soon-to-be first-year and returning women M.B.A. students, some of whom left the event with internship offers for summer 2018.
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Great Storytelling Connects Employees to Their Work

Great Storytelling Connects Employees to Their Work | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Connection happens when you see past the details of a task to its human consequences. When you feel connected to the moral purpose of your work, you behave differently. Now “moral purpose” might sound lofty but it needn’t mean saving a puppy or curing cancer; it can involve any kind of human service. And at the end of the day, all business is about service.

That’s where leaders come in. The first responsibility of leaders — whether front line supervisors, middle managers, or executives — is to compensate for the inevitable alienation that complex organizations create, and provide employees with a visceral connection to the human purpose they serve. And that’s what I observed Danny Meyer’s leaders doing better than most.
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We Overcommit Because We Don’t Want to Disappoint. But Then We Disappoint Because We’re Overcommitted

We Overcommit Because We Don’t Want to Disappoint. But Then We Disappoint Because We’re Overcommitted | Careers Today | Scoop.it
There’s nothing wrong with wanting to please. In fact, we’re hardwired for it. But when we overcommit ourselves, we spend our time checking things off a list rather than actually creating value.
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What to Do About Mediocrity on Your Team

What to Do About Mediocrity on Your Team | Careers Today | Scoop.it
1. Show the consequences of mediocrity. Your first job as a leader is to ensure everyone is clear about what they are doing and why they are doing it. Mediocrity is typically evidence of disconnection between someone’s work and the consequences of their mediocrity.
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How to Evaluate, Accept, Reject, or Negotiate a Job Offer

How to Evaluate, Accept, Reject, or Negotiate a Job Offer | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Shift your mindset
First, you must recognize that receiving an offer represents a “new and different phase” of the job search process, says Lees. “The purpose of the interview is to get the offer,” he says. The next stage is about weighing that offer and then negotiating with your new employer. “Pause, you are starting a new chapter.” Bear in mind that even though the job is yours if you want it, you must “continue to be enthusiastic” in your dealings with your prospective manager, says Lees. “By sounding critical or suspicious or by questioning something about the offer, you are sending a negative signal,” he says. “It sounds as if you’re uncertain that you want job.” That may indeed be the case, but it’s not the message you want to send to your would-be manager. “Employers need to feel that you are committed.”

Be methodical
Next, you need to think about what matters to you in both your professional and private life and then “assess the offer” against these metrics, says Weiss. “People tend to focus on the dollars, but it is useful to ask, “What is of value to me?” After all, money is only one component of career satisfaction. “Very often it comes down to, ‘I would rather make X amount of money and be excited to go to work in the morning, than make X plus 10% and hate my job,’” he says. Below are the most important components to take into account as you assess the offer.
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Why the Lowly Dandelion Is a Better Metaphor for Leaders than the Mighty Banyan

Why the Lowly Dandelion Is a Better Metaphor for Leaders than the Mighty Banyan | Careers Today | Scoop.it
In stark contrast to the banyan is a small weed that lives an unremarkable, fleeting life — the dandelion.

From conventional reasoning, you’d be hard pressed to find a management guru who would recommend that we lead like dandelions. But, just as improbable as it sounds, could the small, frail dandelion — a sworn pest of the suburban yard, in fact, offer a better metaphor for modern day leadership?

Further inspection reveals some interesting characteristics that correlate.  Dandelions fall under a class known as beneficial weeds, which help the plants around them. Dandelions do this by sending taproots deep into the ground. These taproots pull nutrients up to the surface, improving the quality of the soil and feeding shallow-rooted plants nearby. Dandelions also attract insects that enable pollination, like bees, which help other flowering plants. Plants that might not otherwise have a chance to germinate or survive get a shot at life because of the nutrients and insects that dandelions send their way. Yes, dandelions are prolific and fight for territory, but they don’t grow large and they fade quickly after blooming, giving other species a chance to thrive. They may not be the showiest plants, but they leave the environment a better place.
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How Movies Can Help Robots and People Get Along

That’s the finding of a recent study that had 56 undergraduate students rate their feelings toward humanlike service robots. Half of the group watched the science-fiction movie “Robot and Frank,” which involved a robot, and the other half watched “Safety Not Guaranteed,” a sci-fi romantic comedy that didn’t involve robots, before they made their decision.

The result: Those who viewed the movie with the robot were more likely to say that they would buy humanoid robots that assist the elderly. The researchers chose helper robots because they are becoming a common way to assist seniors and people with disabilities, but the same results could easily apply to the workplace, says Martina Mara, head of the robopsychology research division at Ars Electronica Futurelab, a multidisciplinary research center in Linz, Austria, and one of four researchers of the study.
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The 3 Simple Rules of Managing Top Talent

The 3 Simple Rules of Managing Top Talent | Careers Today | Scoop.it
The general view in business is that top-end talent is highly sensitive to and motivated by compensation and that big monetary rewards are key to their management. There is a grain of truth to this — but only a grain. In my 36-year career, I haven’t met a single person truly at the top end of the talent distribution who is highly motivated by compensation. Not one.

Sure, I’ve met lots of successful people who are highly motivated by compensation: CEOs who pump up the perceived value of their company to sell it, hedge fund managers who destroy companies for short-term gain, investment bankers who get their clients to acquire companies they shouldn’t to earn big fees, consultants who sell their clients work that they don’t need, and me-first athletes who poison their teams.

But none are the kind of top-end talent who make their organization great for a sustained period.
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Colleges, Faced With Funding Cuts, Target Tenure Trims

Colleges, Faced With Funding Cuts, Target Tenure Trims | Careers Today | Scoop.it
For decades, tenured professors held some of the most prestigious and secure jobs in the U.S. Now, their status is under attack at public and private colleges alike.

In states facing budget pressures such as Missouri, North Dakota and Iowa, Republican lawmakers have introduced bills for the current legislative sessions to eliminate tenure, cut back its protections or create added hoops that tenured faculty at public colleges must jump through to keep their jobs. University administrators, struggling to shave their costs, are trying to limit the ranks of tenured professors or make it easier to fire them.

The institution of tenure—which provides job security and perks like regular sabbaticals—began in the U.S. early in the 20th century as a bulwark against interference from administrators, corporate interests and politicians who might not like professors’ opinions or agree with their research.
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Seth's Blog: The thing about maps

Seth's Blog: The thing about maps | Careers Today | Scoop.it
The thing about maps
Sometimes, when we're lost, we refuse a map, even when offered. 

Because the map reminds us that we made a mistake. That we were wrong.

But without a map, we're not just wrong, we're also still lost.

A map doesn't automatically get you home, but it will probably make you less lost. 

(When dealing with the unknown, it's difficult to admit that there might not be a map. In those cases, a compass is essential, a way to remind yourself of your true north...)
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Nudging Companies to Look Beyond the C-Suite for Women Directors

Nudging Companies to Look Beyond the C-Suite for Women Directors | Careers Today | Scoop.it
“A board needs to be diverse,” says Mr. Smith, talking about Kraton, which makes polymers used in products like baby-diaper elastic and roofing material. “If you’re going to understand the markets you’re in, you can’t do it from the same background, education and similar life experiences.”
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Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg Urges Gender Diversity in Workplace

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg Urges Gender Diversity in Workplace | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Though roughly equal percentages of men and women make up entry-level jobs, men outnumber women nearly 2 to 1 by the first rung up the management ladder, a gap that widens with every step toward the top. The drop-off is even more acute for women of color, who make up less than 4% of senior jobs.

The study is one of the largest efforts to capture the perceptions and experiences of both working women and men, and includes information from 222 companies and 70,000 of those companies’ employees in North America.
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We’re Thinking About Organizational Culture All Wrong

We’re Thinking About Organizational Culture All Wrong | Careers Today | Scoop.it
The idea that unity can be generated among employees by fixing or creating an organizational culture relies on a naïve assumption that culture unambiguously brings people together. But the reality of culture is that it represents a tremendously complex variable that can both bring people together and pull them apart — or do both at the same time.
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Seth's Blog: Change is a word...

Seth's Blog: Change is a word... | Careers Today | Scoop.it
for a journey with stress. You get the journey and you get the stress. At the end, you're a different person. But both elements are part of the deal. There are plenty of journeys that are stress-free. They tak
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Seth's Blog: No way out

Seth's Blog: No way out | Careers Today | Scoop.it
No way out
That's why we burn the boats when we land on the beach.

Because the only way out is through.

It's pretty easy to bail out of a course (especially a free online course that no one even knows you signed up for). Easy to quit your job, fire a client or give up on a relationship.

In the moment, walking out is precisely the best short-term strategy. Sometimes this place is too hard, too unpleasant, too much...

The thing is, though, that the long-term strategy might be the opposite. The best long-term approach might be to learn something, to tough it out, to engage with the challenge. Because once you get through this, you'll be different. Better.

We always have a choice, but often, it's a good idea to act as if we don't.
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Have Our Attitudes About Sexual Harassment Really Changed?

Have Our Attitudes About Sexual Harassment Really Changed? | Careers Today | Scoop.it
So how much has really changed in the past 35 years? Well, 98% of companies today have anti-sexual harassment policies, and 70% provide some type of training in how to recognize and deal with it. In the 1981 HBR survey, just 29% of companies reported having any formal prohibition against harassment, and only 8% reported having ”manuals, films, and so forth” by way of training. That is progress of a sort, although I’m not sure what sort: A 2016 study found that although (or perhaps because) corporate sexual harassment policies have become more standardized and formulaic, employees often interpret them negatively, and feel that they create a culture of fear instead of a culture of mutual respect.

Moreover, recent statistics show that despite all of the policies and programs, one in three women have experienced harassment, and only 5%–15% of those women complain to their companies. And bystanders often remain silent, whether they are male or female. Even now, when women do lodge formal complaints, firms still have a tendency to retaliate against them, rather than punishing their harassers, unless more women come forward or the cacophony of complaints becomes too much to ignore.

At Fox it took a raft of horror stories before the company moved to address its problem, and even then it seems the company may have been motivated not so much by a desire to be fair to its female employees as by the fierce glare of public shame. Perhaps, then, what’s really changed is not our attitudes about harassment, but rather the brightness and staying power of that spotlight.

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Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance

Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Today, when so much work and leisure time involve staring at screens, I see a different struggle arising: a struggle to find a healthy balance between technology and the physical world, or, for short, “tech/body balance.” A  2016 survey from Deloitte found that Americans collectively check their phones 8 billion times per day. The average for individual Americans was 46 checks per day, including during leisure time—watching TV, spending time with friends, eating dinner.

So attached are we to our devices that it’s not unusual to have your phone with you at all times. We carry our phones around everywhere as if they are epi-pens and we all have fatal allergies. Consider: two weeks ago, as I was beginning a consulting project at a midtown Manhattan corporate office, I found myself making a U-turn on the way to the restroom. I needed to go back to my office to pick up my cellphone, which I had inadvertently left behind. It was an unconscious decision to go back and get it, but my assumption was clear: I needed to take the phone with me to the bathroom. Was I going to make a clandestine call from a bathroom stall? No. Was I dealing with an urgent business matter? Fortunately not. So why did I need my phone with me while I took care of a basic physical need? I didn’t really know. But apparently 90% of use our phones in the bathroom.
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The Trade-Off Every AI Company Will Face

The Trade-Off Every AI Company Will Face | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Machines learn faster with more data, and more data is generated when machines are deployed in the wild. However, bad things can happen in the wild and harm the company brand. Putting products in the wild earlier accelerates learning but risks harming the brand (and perhaps the customer!); putting products in the wild later slows learning but allows for more time to improve the product in-house and protect the brand (and, again, perhaps the customer).

For some products, like Google Inbox, the answer to the trade-off seems clear because the cost of poor performance is low and the benefits from learning from customer usage are high. It makes sense to deploy this type of product in the wild early. For other products, like cars, the answer is less clear. As more companies seek to take advantage of machine learning, this is a trade-off more and more will have to make.
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Incentives Don’t Help People Change, but Peer Pressure Does

Incentives Don’t Help People Change, but Peer Pressure Does | Careers Today | Scoop.it
These findings echo one of the main concerns associated with monetary rewards that sometimes fail to accomplish their goals. Academics refer to this phenomenon as the crowding-out effect of explicit incentives on intrinsic motivation. In other words, associating an economic value with a certain activity changes the nature of the exchange. If health care workers sanitize their hands because it is in the best interest of the patient (and themselves), introducing monetary rewards may change their motivation to a contractual exchange of hand sanitizing for money.
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The Power of Conferences in a Social-Media Age

The Power of Conferences in a Social-Media Age | Careers Today | Scoop.it
In the social-media age, the idea of going to a conference, or gathering for several days of face-to-face meetings, seems almost quaint.

But the truth is the opposite: Social media has made conference-going more valuable than ever. The value of those in-person encounters comes not in spite of, but increasingly because of, the way we use technology and social media—from the colleague we discover on social media (before setting up a date to meet at a coming conference) to the presentation that takes one’s professional reputation to new heights (because it’s amplified on Twitter).

Say you met a great prospect over coffee at a conference. Who is the prospect going to remember in a month: the person he spent 30 minutes with or the person he spent 30 minutes with and with whom he subsequently exchanged half a dozen tweets? Knowing how to make smart use of social media in connection with conferences is the secret to being the person who gets remembered.
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Seven Steps to Reduce Bias in Hiring

Seven Steps to Reduce Bias in Hiring | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Why is it that many of the world’s most advanced companies struggle to create diversified workforces, despite spending hundreds of millions of dollars on diversity training and recruitment?

Implicit bias may be partly to blame, or the idea that even people with the best of intentions toward diversity can harbor attitudes and beliefs that affect their thoughts, feelings and actions outside of their awareness.

These biases stem from our preference for people who are similar to us, provide a feeling of safety, or feel familiar. Indeed, research has shown that men and women alike start to treat minorities differently within milliseconds of seeing them. Our brains automatically carve the world into in-group and out-group members and apply stereotypes within the blink of an eye.

This creates a conundrum for organizations: They want to improve diversity through hiring and promotions, yet doing so requires people to overcome a mental process over which they have little control and that training can’t fix.
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