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8 questions about open source cancer treatment - CNN.com

8 questions about open source cancer treatment - CNN.com | cancer | Scoop.it
Salvatore Iaconesi's essay on posting his medical records on the Internet raised questions about using crowd to find cancer cure.
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Revolutionary breast cancer vaccine 100% effective in mice: awaits human trials

Revolutionary breast cancer vaccine 100% effective in mice: awaits human trials | cancer | Scoop.it
Cleveland Clinic Research, Dr. VInce Tuohy has developed a breast cancer vaccine that has proven 100 percent effective in three animal models. Needs 6 million dollars to test on women.

Via Cancer Commons
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No, a Universal Cancer Vaccine Was Not Just Developed

No, a Universal Cancer Vaccine Was Not Just Developed | cancer | Scoop.it
While a recent media report was more hype than science, it did focus on a promising pathway for cancer treatments.
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If The Health Care Industry Married Silicon Valley, They’d Have Babies Named “Cure” | TechCrunch

If The Health Care Industry Married Silicon Valley, They’d Have Babies Named “Cure” | TechCrunch | cancer | Scoop.it
I just got back to San Francisco from the 15-year celebration of LIVESTRONG, the Lance Armstrong Foundation.
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Cancer drugs fall short of hopes and cost too much, doctors say

Cancer drugs fall short of hopes and cost too much, doctors say | cancer | Scoop.it
Progress against cancer is stalling, with the latest targeted cancer drugs failing to live up to expectations and priced so high that treatment is becoming unaffordable even in rich countries, according to experts at a meeting of nearly 100 eminent cancer specialists from around the world.

 

At the two-day meeting in Lugano, Switzerland, the doctors agreed a 10-point declaration, to be published early next year, which will chart the way forward for cancer care around the globe. Much needs to be done, they believe, to improve treatment, care and prevention both in the developed world and in poor countries, where cancer rates are rising even faster. They agreed to embark on an ambitious plan to get essential cancer care to those who are dying early in developing countries, in the same way that Aids doctors took on the fight to get HIV treatment into hard-hit Africa.

 

Only a few years ago, many cancer experts thought the arrival of targeted medicines, designed to attack the genetic makeup of the tumour, would make dramatic inroads into cancer deaths. That has not happened. Instead, these therapies have only bought a few extra months of life. If the question was whether the world was winning the war on cancer, said Douglas Hanahan of the Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research, who outlined the latest state of drug research, "in general, for most forms of human cancer, the answer is clearly no".

 

The excitement generated by targeted drugs, which interfere with specific molecules involved in tumour growth and suppression, has been short-lived. Doctors reported apparently miraculous results from the use of the BRAF-inhibitor vemurafenib in advanced malignant melanoma, a usually fatal form of skin cancer. Within two weeks, the tumours had melted away. "But six months later, the cancer is back with a vengeance," he said. Other drugs working in a similar way – including erlotinib (Tarceva) for a form of lung cancer, bevacizumab (Avastin) for breast, colorectal and other cancers, and sunitinib (Sutent) for renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal sarcoma – have also not done so well, said Hanahan. Resistance to the drugs builds up, sometimes very quickly. "All came on line with great expectations. The reality check is they are all working in the important first step, but we have a long way to go in terms of winning the war."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Brian Shields
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6-year-old fighting brain cancer hopes online effort will help...

6-year-old fighting brain cancer hopes online effort will help... | cancer | Scoop.it
A Shaler Township 6-year-old who is battling brain cancer is hoping an online effort will help get him a chance to meet his personal hero, WWE star Daniel Bryan.
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