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Ancient Wisdom Boosts Sustainability of Biotech Cotton | Science Newsline

Ancient Wisdom Boosts Sustainability of Biotech Cotton | Science Newsline | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Advocates of biotech crops and those who favor traditional farming practices such as crop diversity often seem worlds apart, but a new study shows that these two approaches can be compatible. An international team led by Chinese scientists and Bruce Tabashnik at the University of Arizona's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences discovered that the diverse patchwork of crops in northern China slowed adaptation to genetically engineered cotton by a wide-ranging insect pest. The results are published in the advance online edition of…
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Combining computer modeling and field research on cotton pests, a University of Arizone-led study suggests that biotechnology and traditional agriculture can be compatible approaches toward sustain...

Advocates of biotech crops and those who favor traditional farming practices such as crop diversity often seem worlds apart, but a new study shows that these two approaches can be compatible. An international team led by Chinese scientists and Bruce Tabashnik at the University of Arizona's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences discovered that the diverse patchwork of crops in northern China slowed adaptation to genetically engineered cotton by a wide-ranging insect pest. The results are published in the advance online edition of Nature Biotechnology.


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Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | ECN Magazine

Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | ECN Magazine | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Advocates of biotech crops and those who favor traditional farming practices such as crop diversity often seem worlds apart, but a new study shows that these two approaches can be compatible. An international team led by Chinese scientists and
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Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | Phys.org

Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | Phys.org | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Advocates of biotech crops and those who favor traditional farming practices such as crop diversity often seem worlds apart, but a new study shows that these two approaches can be compatible. An international team led by Chinese scientists and Bruce Tabashnik at the University of Arizona's College of ...
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Parasites trigger healthy eating in caterpillars | Bio-Medicine

Some parasites trigger their own destruction by altering their hosts' behavior, researchers at The University of Arizona and Wesleyan University report in Nature.

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How Beetles Hack Into Ant Colonies | UANews

How Beetles Hack Into Ant Colonies | UANews | CALS in the News | Scoop.it

We've all heard the story of the Trojan horse, when unsuspecting Trojans opened their city's gate to a giant wooden horse, only to find themselves ambushed by the Greek soldiers hiding inside.

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'Focus on cotton' webcasts address cures for sticky cotton | Western Farm Press

'Focus on cotton' webcasts address cures for sticky cotton | Western Farm Press | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Webcasts available 24/7 Learn causes and curse for "sticky cotton" 
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Record number of mosquito calls in Maricopa County | Arizona Republic

Record number of mosquito calls in Maricopa County | Arizona Republic | CALS in the News | Scoop.it

Maricopa County has received record numbers of calls about mosquitoes since the first of several storms hit in early September, triggering ideal breeding conditions for the insects.



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Evolutionary biology: It's not just for textbooks anymore | Bright Surf

Solving global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss requires evolutionary thinking, argues a new study published online in Science Express that was co-authored by Bruce Tabashnik of the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.
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What Can Evolutionary Biology Learn From Creationists? | Humanity Plus Magazine

What Can Evolutionary Biology Learn From Creationists? | Humanity Plus Magazine | CALS in the News | Scoop.it

You might expect a professional evolutionary biologist like myself to claim that my discipline has nothing to learn from creationists.

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New approach to solve global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss | News Medical

Solving global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss requires evolutionary thinking, argues a new study published online in Science Express that was co-authored by Bruce Tabashnik of the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.
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When it comes to spreading germs, the hand is quicker than the sneeze | Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN)

Researchers put a tracer virus on one or two surfaces in a building (for example, a doorknob or push plate) at the beginning of the day. And after two to four hours, the virus could be detected on a majority of commonly touched surfaces such as light switches, coffee pot handles, phones and computers.

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Live Bugs Tell of a Bug's Life at Insect Festival | Yuma News Now

Ask any entomologist, and you might be told that bugs rule the world. Each year in September, they certainly rule the show during the Arizona Insect Festival. Now in its fourth year, the event has the University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center crawling with an estimated 5,000 people, wanting to learn about insects, interact with them and marvel at their incredible diversity.

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Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | Science Codex

Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | Science Codex | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Advocates of biotech crops and those who favor traditional farming practices such as crop diversity often seem worlds apart, but a new study shows that these two approaches can be compatible. An international team led by Chinese scientists and Bruce
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Why Chinese Biotech Cotton Doesn't Lead To Pest Resistance, Even Without Non-Bt Refuges | Science 2.0

Why Chinese Biotech Cotton Doesn't Lead To Pest Resistance, Even Without Non-Bt Refuges | Science 2.0 | CALS in the News | Scoop.it

In the United States in the 1930s, climate change and droughts and excessive agricultural practices combined to give the country a 'Dust Bowl' - as farmers became more stressed during the Depression they farmed harder, so ancient agricultural practices got left behind.

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Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | Ag Professional

Ancient wisdom boosts sustainability of biotech cotton | Ag Professional | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
An international team led by Chinese scientists and Bruce Tabashnik at the University of Arizona's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences discovered that the diverse patchwork of crops in northern China slowed adaptation to genetically engineered cotton by a wide-ranging insect pest.
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Honey bee research buzzing on UA campus | Arizona Daily Wildcat

UA affiliates and students are currently active in honey bee research with the vision that the bees are beneficial to the Tucson economy and ecology.
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How beetles hack into ant colonies | Phys.org

How beetles hack into ant colonies | Phys.org | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Pretending to be one of them, ant-nest beetles trick ants to rear their brood—and then reward their hosts by devouring them. UA entomologists have discovered that the beetles evolve at an astonishing rate.
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Genetically modified organisms: safe to eat and well regulated, scientists say | Arizona Daily Wildcat

Genetically modified organisms: safe to eat and well regulated, scientists say | Arizona Daily Wildcat | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Transgenic or genetically modified crops have long been a fear for some consumers. However, studies show GM crops are actually highly regulated and can replace or reduce the use of dangerous chemicals in agriculture.
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County gets record number of mosquito calls | Tempe in Motion (Blog)

County gets record number of mosquito calls | Tempe in Motion (Blog) | CALS in the News | Scoop.it

Culex mosquitoes can carry the West Nile virus. With the recent rainstorms, the mosquito population has exploded, causing an increase in bites and the possibility of West Nile virus exposure.(Photo: Charlie Leight/The Republic) 19 CONNECT LINKEDIN EMAILMORE The bloodsuckers are back. Maricopa County has received record numbers of calls about mosquitoes since the first of several storms hit in early Se

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Evolutionary Biology is Not Just for Textbooks Anymore | Medindia

Evolutionary Biology is Not Just for Textbooks Anymore | Medindia | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Solving global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss requires evolutionary thinking, argues a new study published online in Science Express.
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To tackle diverse global problems, look to evolutionary biology | Davis Enterprise

Evolutionary biology techniques can and must be used to help solve global challenges in agriculture, medicine and environmental sciences, advises a nine-member global team led by an evolutionary ec...
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Evolutionary Biology: It's Not Just for Textbooks Anymore | Science Newsline

Solving global challenges in food security, emerging diseases and biodiversity loss requires evolutionary thinking, argues a new study published online in Science Express that was co-authored by Bruce Tabashnik of the University of Arizona College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.
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The Archaeology News Network: Evolutionary tools improve prospects for sustainable development | Archaeology News Network

The Archaeology News Network: Evolutionary tools improve prospects for sustainable development | Archaeology News Network | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
For the first time, scientists have reviewed progress in addressing a broad set of challenges in agriculture, medicine and environmental management using evolutionary approaches, approaches that consider species’ evolutionary histories and the likelihood of rapid evolutionary adaptation to human activities.
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Evolutionary biology key to tackling diverse global problems | Imperial Valley Press (El Centro CA)

Evolutionary biology techniques can and must be used to help solve global challenges in agriculture, medicine and environmental sciences, advises a nine-member global team led by an evolutionary ecologist from University of California, Davis.



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