California construction law
4 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Clint Shaw
Scoop.it!

International Green Construction Code Passes - BuildingGreen

International Green Construction Code Passes - BuildingGreen | California construction law | Scoop.it
Clint Shaw's insight:

Want to know more about green building? Here's some highlights from the International Green Construction Code.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Clint Shaw from California construction law
Scoop.it!

Unlicensed Activity Threatens Credible Contractors

Unlicensed Activity Threatens Credible Contractors | California construction law | Scoop.it
Known by such monikers as “fly-by-nighters,” “chuck-in-a-truck,” and “moonlighters,” unlicensed contractors are likely approaching homeowners in your neighborhood right now. While these under-the-table workers may offer what seems like a great bargain, their discounted prices may end up costing much more in the end.
Clint Shaw's insight:

Many unlicensed contractors don’t obtain permits for their work or have the work inspected by building inspectors. Where residential properties are concerned, the owner is required to disclose that the work was done without permits – unpermitted work can negatively impact the price of your home when you sell.

 

Unlicensed contractors are not bonded, so if they don’t complete the work, you are left to finish it yourself or find another contractor - even if you've already paid for the work.

 

There is often no written contract, leaving the details of the job up to interpretation. Unlicensed contractors often don’t pay taxes on their construction income, potentially exposing you to the risk of having to pay employment taxes.

 

Unlicensed contractors don’t have worker's compensation insurance. So if someone working on your job or property is injured, you could be personally liable.

 

So, while you might save money hiring unlicensed contractors – ask yourself if its work the risk.

more...
Clint Shaw's curator insight, July 12, 2014 10:39 PM

Many unlicensed contractors don’t obtain permits for their work or have the work inspected by building inspectors. Where residential properties are concerned, the owner is required to disclose that the work was done without permits – unpermitted work can negatively impact the price of your home when you sell.

 

Unlicensed contractors are not bonded, so if they don’t complete the work, you are left to finish it yourself or find another contractor - even if you've already paid for the work.

 

There is often no written contract, leaving the details of the job up to interpretation. Unlicensed contractors often don’t pay taxes on their construction income, potentially exposing you to the risk of having to pay employment taxes.

 

Unlicensed contractors don’t have worker's compensation insurance. So if someone working on your job or property is injured, you could be personally liable.

 

So, while you might save money hiring unlicensed contractors – ask yourself if its work the risk.

Scooped by Clint Shaw
Scoop.it!

Homeowners planning to remodel face new water-conservation rules

Homeowners planning to remodel face new water-conservation rules | California construction law | Scoop.it
After the first of the year, homeowners across the state planning to remodel will have to comply with a new year's resolution of sorts: Installing water-conserving plumbing fixtures.
Clint Shaw's insight:

Check out this comparison of low flow shower heads:


http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/27/garden/27roadtest.html?_r=0

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Clint Shaw
Scoop.it!

Unlicensed Activity Threatens Credible Contractors

Unlicensed Activity Threatens Credible Contractors | California construction law | Scoop.it
Known by such monikers as “fly-by-nighters,” “chuck-in-a-truck,” and “moonlighters,” unlicensed contractors are likely approaching homeowners in your neighborhood right now. While these under-the-table workers may offer what seems like a great bargain, their discounted prices may end up costing much more in the end.
Clint Shaw's insight:

Many unlicensed contractors don’t obtain permits for their work or have the work inspected by building inspectors. Where residential properties are concerned, the owner is required to disclose that the work was done without permits – unpermitted work can negatively impact the price of your home when you sell.

 

Unlicensed contractors are not bonded, so if they don’t complete the work, you are left to finish it yourself or find another contractor - even if you've already paid for the work.

 

There is often no written contract, leaving the details of the job up to interpretation. Unlicensed contractors often don’t pay taxes on their construction income, potentially exposing you to the risk of having to pay employment taxes.

 

Unlicensed contractors don’t have worker's compensation insurance. So if someone working on your job or property is injured, you could be personally liable.

 

So, while you might save money hiring unlicensed contractors – ask yourself if its work the risk.

more...
Clint Shaw's curator insight, July 12, 2014 11:07 PM

Many unlicensed contractors don’t obtain permits for their work or have the work inspected by building inspectors. Where residential properties are concerned, the owner is required to disclose that the work was done without permits – unpermitted work can negatively impact the price of your home when you sell.

 

Unlicensed contractors are not bonded, so if they don’t complete the work, you are left to finish it yourself or find another contractor - even if you've already paid for the work.

 

There is often no written contract, leaving the details of the job up to interpretation. Unlicensed contractors often don’t pay taxes on their construction income, potentially exposing you to the risk of having to pay employment taxes.

 

Unlicensed contractors don’t have worker's compensation insurance. So if someone working on your job or property is injured, you could be personally liable.

 

So, while you might save money hiring unlicensed contractors – ask yourself if its work the risk.