California and the Civil War
84 views | +0 today
Follow
California and the Civil War
Way out west the conflict came home to roost, this page attempts to bring together information about the effects of the Civil War out west.
Curated by Jane Applebee
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Island Insights – The Angel Island Blog » Blog Archive » Camp Reynolds

Island Insights – The Angel Island Blog » Blog Archive » Camp Reynolds | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
Jane Applebee's insight:

Short introduction to Camp Reynolds, a Civil War fort on Angel Island in the San Francisco Bay - part of a line of defense across the gate.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Bad Blood in the Bald Hills

Bad Blood in the Bald Hills | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
As the Civil War raged in the East, settler-Indian violence tore apart northern California.
Jane Applebee's insight:

From the New York Times Series, Disunion. The Civil War cut the Native Californians a little slack as federal troops headed east giving them more of a chance to keep and reclaim their land. It was a momentary glimmer of hope soon extinguished.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

California History Collection - From Gold Rush to Golden State

California History Collection - From Gold Rush to Golden State | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
Short article on California from 1850-1880
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Secession Crises in California | California's Olden Golden Days

Secession Crises in California | California's Olden Golden Days | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
Two years later at the outbreak of the Civil War, California's very attachment to the Union became a vital question in political back-parlors. Los Angeles and neighboring El Monte, by 1860 populated largely by settlers from ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

THE CIVIL WAR IN CALIFORNIA

THE CIVIL WAR IN CALIFORNIA | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it

Super good site to start your research into Civil War California.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

1st Battalion of Native Cavalry, California Volunteers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

1st Battalion of Native Cavalry, California Volunteers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it

Californios, Native Californians, and immigrants from Latin America and France made up the most of the numbers of this battalion which was originally stationed in San Francisco before being sent to the Arizona Territory.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Queen of the Northern Mines

Queen of the Northern Mines | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
This page is dedicated to interesting facts about the Civil War in California, compiled by the authors of Queen of the Northern Mines.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Santa Cruz County History - Santa Cruz Public Libraries

3 part article by Phil Reader on Copperheads, Secesh Men, and Confederate Treason in California from the Santa Cruz Public Library website...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

California and the Civil War Exibit at the Folsom History Museum

California and the Civil War Exibit at the Folsom History Museum | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it

Also from the Queen of the Northern Mines site. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Walnut Creek: Why California was relatively insulated from Civil War's effects - San Jose Mercury News

Walnut Creek: Why California was relatively insulated from Civil War's effects - San Jose Mercury News | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
Walnut Creek: Why California was relatively insulated from Civil War's effects San Jose Mercury News WALNUT CREEK -- In one of a handful of public events aimed at commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War -- with a salute to the national...
Jane Applebee's insight:

The state libarian speaks on California in the Civil War.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

The Civil War in Art : Teaching & Learning Through Chicago Collections | Introduction : Image as Identity and Memory

The Civil War in Art : Teaching & Learning Through Chicago Collections | Introduction : Image as Identity and Memory | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
"The Civil War in Art: Teaching and Learning through Chicago Collections" is intended to help teachers and students learn about the Civil War—its causes and effects, and connect to the issues, events, and people of the era through works of art.

 

There is no focus on California but a good site if you are considering analyzing art from the period or creating art as part of your presentation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

California, First Person Narratives: General Collections: Library of Congress

California, First Person Narratives: General Collections: Library of Congress | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
The California As I Saw It: First-Person Narratives of California's Early Years, 1849 - 1900, collection contains 190 books about individual experiences in and on the way to California during and after the Gold Rush.
more...
Jane Applebee's comment, July 18, 2013 10:59 PM
Photo taken on a backpacking trip near Weaverville, CA in the Trinity Alps.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Mental Masala: How the Golden Gate Got Its Name

Mental Masala: How the Golden Gate Got Its Name | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it
The name was given by John C. Fremont, one of those larger-than-life men of the 19th century: explorer, military governor of California, one of California's first U.S. Senators, a Major General for the Union in the Civil War, and ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

California Indian History - California, a "free" state?

California Indian History - California, a "free" state? | California and the Civil War | Scoop.it

"Despite entering the union as a free state in 1850, the California legislature rapidly enacted a series of laws legalizing Indian slavery. One of the laws sanctioned an indenture system similar to Mexican peonage in widespread practice throughout California prior to 1850. All levels of state, county and local governments participated in this ugly practice that evolved into a heartless policy of killing Indian parents and kidnapping and indenturing the victims children. Indian youth could be enslaved by the cruel act to the age of 30 for males and 25 for females. This barbarous law was finally repealed four years after President Lincoln's emancipation proclamation in 1863."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

California Gold, Nativism and Racism

"In the 1850s and 60s whites raided Indian villages and kidnapped their inhabitants to sell them to farmers and ranchers -- peonage had been transformed into slavery."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jane Applebee
Scoop.it!

Mail service ties California to the East

The first transcontinental mail service to San Francisco begins, Sep 15, 1858:
“On this day in 1858, the new Overland Mail Company sends out its first two stages, inaugurating government mail service between the eastern and western regions of the nation.

With California booming, thanks to the 1849 Gold Rush, Americans east and west had been clamoring for faster and surer transcontinental mail service for years. Finally, in March 1857, the U.S. Congress passed an act authorizing an overland mail delivery service and a $600,000 yearly subsidy for whatever company could succeed in reliably transporting the mail twice a week from St. Louis to San Francisco in less than 25 days. The postmaster general awarded the first government contract and subsidy to the Overland Mail Company. Under the guidance of a board of directors that included John Butterfield and William Fargo, the Overland Mail Company spent $1 million improving its winding 2,800-mile route and building way stations at 10-15 mile intervals. Teams of thundering horses soon raced across the wide open spaces of the West, pulling custom-built Concord coaches with seats for nine passengers and a rear boot for the mail.

For passengers, the overland route was anything but a pleasure trip. Packed into the narrow confines of the coaches, they alternately baked or froze as they bumped across the countryside, and dust was an inescapable companion. Since the coaches traveled night and day, travelers were reluctant to stop and sleep at one of the "home stations" along the route because they risked being stranded if later stages were full. Many opted to try and make it through the three-week trip by sleeping on the stage, but the constant bumping and noise made real sleep almost impossible. Travelers also found that toilets and baths were few and far between, the food was poor and pricey, and the stage drivers were often drunk, rude, profane, or all three. Robberies and Indian attacks were a genuine threat, though they occurred far less commonly than popularly believed. The company posted guards at stations in dangerous areas, and armed men occasionally rode with the coach driver to protect passengers.

Though other faster mail delivery services soon came to compete with the Overland Mail Company-most famously the Pony Express-the nation's first regular trans-western mail service continued to operate as a part of the larger Wells, Fargo and Company operation until May 10, 1869, the day the first transcontinental railroad was completed. On that day the U.S. government cancelled its last overland mail contract.”

more...