C21 learning: ideas and tools for teachers
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C21 learning: ideas and tools for teachers
Curated by Jean Jacoby, Teaching Consultant (Online), Massey University
Curated by Jean Jacoby
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News and Threat Research: Mobile Malware Gets in the Top 10 Viruses

News and Threat Research: Mobile Malware Gets in the Top 10 Viruses | C21 learning: ideas and tools for teachers | Scoop.it

Up to now, mobile malware were certainly growing, but still minor compared to PC malware. Well, this is about to change. We have recently acknowledged a mobile malware getting in our top 10 virus activity, where usually there were only PC malware. The (sad) winner is Android/Plankton.B!tr, with a record prevalence of 4.42% (note: prevalence is the number of new hits in a given time frame divided by the number of fortigates reporting during that same interval of time).

 

This would currently rank it as the 6th most active virus - PC malware included. Actually, Plankton (also known as Counterclank and NewyearL) is a very intrusive form of advertisement which changes your browser’s home page, adds bookmarks, shortcuts or records your search queries. Some other AV vendors classify it as an adware, anyway, what’s for sure is that end-users won’t want it on their phones… and the fact is that it is more and more wide spread…

 

===> This definitely is a new milestone in mobile malware’s history. I take the opportunity to draw your attention on the mobile world. <===

 

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, July 31, 2013 3:22 PM

 

This would currently rank it as the 6th most active virus - PC malware included. Actually, Plankton (also known as Counterclank and NewyearL) is a very intrusive form of advertisement which changes your browser’s home page, adds bookmarks, shortcuts or records your search queries. Some other AV vendors classify it as an adware, anyway, what’s for sure is that end-users won’t want it on their phones… and the fact is that it is more and more wide spread…

 

===> This definitely is a new milestone in mobile malware’s history. I take the opportunity to draw your attention on the mobile world. <===

 
Rescooped by Jean Jacoby from 21st Century Tools for Teaching-People and Learners
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Malicious Web Apps: How to Spot Them, How to Beat Them

Malicious Web Apps: How to Spot Them, How to Beat Them | C21 learning: ideas and tools for teachers | Scoop.it
These days, a Web app can be malware. Here’s what you need to know about this emerging threat, and what to watch for.

 

 

Tim Keanini, CTO of nCircle, says cyberattackers are talented, creative developers who are motivated to find innovative ways to part you from your money or information.

 

Typically, a malicious Web app is a form of Trojan horse: The app claims to be something else--and it may in fact run some legitimate utility or application--but once you click it, it runs malicious code in the background that may compromise your system or secretly download other malicious payloads from the Internet.
Speaking of Web apps, Camp warns, "While they allow increased functionality within the browser, users should be aware of how deeply into your system they may be able to reach."

 

===> Don't assume that you're safe if you avoid Microsoft Windows. Web apps do frequently target specific vulnerabilities, and Windows is often a primary focus, but Web apps--both benign and malicious--are fundamentally platform-agnostic. <===

 

Gust MEES: check out also my #itsecurity #tutorials (FREE courses) here

 

http://gustmeesen.wordpress.com/2012/03/16/beginners-it-security-guide/

 

 

- http://gustmeesen.wordpress.com/2012/02/13/why-ict-security-why-the-need-to-secure-a-computer/

 

 

- http://gustmeesen.wordpress.com/2012/01/05/pc-security-howto-secure-my-pc/

 

 


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Bring Your Own Device: Advantages, Dangers, Risks and best Policy to stay secure

Bring Your Own Device: Advantages, Dangers, Risks and best Policy to stay secure | C21 learning: ideas and tools for teachers | Scoop.it

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) is more complex than most people know, read further to learn… . .

 

Keywords for this free course: . motivation, engagement, heroes, Security-Scouts, critical thinking, stay out of the box, adapt to new technologies, be aware of the malware, nobody is perfect, knowing the dangers and risks, responsibility, responsibility of School, responsibility of IT-Admin, responsibilities of BYOD users, Apple insecurity, Insecurity of Apps, Principals responsibilities, Mobile Device Management, risks of BYOD, BYOD-Policy, IT-Security Infrastructure, Teacher-Parents Meeting, Cyberwar, Cyberwarfare, Government, Internet-Safety, IT-Security knowledge basics...

 

The weakest link in the Security Chain is the human! If you don’t respect certain advice you will get tricked by the Cyber-Criminals!


===> NOBODY is perfect! A security by 100% doesn’t exist! <===

 

Read more:

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/07/07/bring-your-own-device-advantages-dangers-and-risks/

 


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kallen214's comment, February 6, 2013 1:18 PM
Thank you for the information.
Gary Harwell's curator insight, April 3, 2013 12:47 AM

Is ti possible that we have a special room for this?

Linda Allen's curator insight, April 5, 2013 1:08 PM

More information on BYOD