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Banana Bacterial Wilt Film, How it spreads and How to control

Banana Bacterial Wilt Film, How it spreads and How to control.
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An ex ante analysis of the impact and cost-effectiveness of biofortified high-provitamin A and high-iron banana in Uganda - Fiedler &al (2013) - IFPRI

An ex ante analysis of the impact and cost-effectiveness of biofortified high-provitamin A and high-iron banana in Uganda - Fiedler &al (2013) - IFPRI | BXW Control | Scoop.it

Uganda has made notable progress in reducing micronutrient deficiencies in recent years, but the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD) and anemia among children under 5 remain unacceptably high... 

 

In this paper we explore the potential contribution to reducing both of these deficiencies using a genetically modified, high–provitamin A and high-iron banana (HPVAHIB) that is currently being developed. We present an ex ante analysis of the costs and nutritional benefits of HPVAHIB.

 

Using the Ugandan National Household Survey of 2005/06, we analyzed the production and consumption patterns of highland cooking banana (nakinyika) and sweet banana (sukalindizi). Informed by the empirical findings, we developed geographically differentiated adoption, production, consumption, and diffusion patterns for several types of HPVAHIB. Based on households’ reported quantities of each type of banana currently consumed, we estimated the number of people consuming each banana and the quantities they consume, and then simulated the additional intakes of vitamin A and iron and estimated the number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) saved attributable to each.

 

Combining the health impacts with the estimated costs of the project, three impact measures of the HPVAHIB are developed: the cost per DALY saved, the benefit–cost ratio, and the internal rate of return... The base scenario, which includes only the biofortification of cooking banana with provitamin A at a level equal to 400 percent its intrinsic provitamin A content, estimates that the net present cost per DALY saved of HPVAHIB is US$62, its benefit–cost ratio is 16, and its internal rate of return is 31 percent.

 

According to criteria established by the World Health Organization and the World Bank, the HPVAHIB project is a “very cost-effective” health intervention. 


Via Alexander J. Stein
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Alexander J. Stein's curator insight, July 19, 2013 7:17 PM

The authors use a DALY value of $1,000 whereas average per-capita income in Uganda is about $1,300. Following the literature, DALYs should best be valued at triple per-capita income, i.e. the benefit-cost ratios and internal rates of return reported here represent very conservative, lower-bound estimates. 

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Symptoms and control of banana xanthomonas wilt disease (BXW)

Identification and farmer management of banana xanthomonas wilt disease (BXW) in Central Africa. www.cialca.org.
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Regional efforts to control banana wilt disease - Banana Bacteria ...

Regional efforts to control banana wilt disease - Banana Bacteria ... | BXW Control | Scoop.it
A team of scientists from Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Rwanda and Burundi, supported by the Association for strengthening Agricultural research in Eastern and Central Africa, is working with farmers and local communities to control the deadly disease...
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PRO/PL> Bacterial wilt, banana | Geostrategic Forecasting

_musacearum_ is the causal organism of banana bacterial wilt in central Africa (BXW; bacterial wilts due to _Ralstonia_ species are present elsewhere). It affects all banana types causing wilting and premature ripening of fruit ...
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The Truth About GMOs | Boston Review

The Truth About GMOs | Boston Review | BXW Control | Scoop.it

Mama Moses has been growing bananas on her farm in southwestern Uganda for twenty years. She farms only bananas, which is typical of subsistence farmers in Sanga, the impoverished village where she lives. Last year, when she saw the flowers on her banana plants begin to shrivel and yellow bacteria ooze from the cut stems, she knew her crop was doomed. Within months the bacterial infection turned her healthy crop into a black, wilted mess.

Banana Xanthomonas wilt disease (BXW) is one of the greatest threats to banana production in Eastern Africa. Cultural practices provide some control, but they are ineffective during epidemics. More than a thousand kinds of banana can be found worldwide, but none has robust resistance to BXW. Even if resistance were identified, most scientists believe that breeding a new variety using conventional methods would take decades, assuming it is even possible.

BXW creates precisely the sort of food insecurity that affects the world’s poorest people. Bananas and plantains are the fourth most valuable food crop after rice, wheat, and maize. Approximately one-third of the bananas produced globally are grown in sub-Saharan Africa, where bananas provide more than 25 percent of the food energy requirements for more than 100 million people.

For anyone worried about the future of global agriculture, Mama Moses’s story is instructive. The world faces an enormous challenge: with changing diets and population growth of 2–3 billion over the next 40 years, UNESCO predicts that food production will need to rise by 70 percent by 2050. Many pests and diseases cannot, however, be controlled using conventional breeding methods. Moreover, subsistence farmers cannot afford most pesticides, which are often ineffective or harmful to the environment.

Yet many emerging agricultural catastrophes can almost certainly be avoided thanks to a modern form of plant breeding that uses genetic engineering (GE), a process that has led to reduced insecticide use and enhanced productivity of farms large and small.

In spite of these benefits, genetic engineering is anathema to many people. In the United States, we’ve seen attempts to force labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In much of Europe, farmers are prohibited from growing genetically engineered crops and so must import grain from the United States. And “GMO-free” zones are expanding in Japan. 

The strong distrust of GE foods is curious. Opponents typically profess a high degree of concern for human welfare and the environment. They want the same things that scientists, farmers, food security experts, and environmentalists want: ecologically sound food production accessible to a growing global population. But their opposition threatens the great strides that have been made toward these goals through deployment of new technologies.

• • •

For 10,000 years, we have altered the genetic makeup of our crops. Conventional approaches are often crude, resulting in new varieties through a combination of trial and error, without knowledge of the precise function of the genes being moved around. Such methods include grafting or mixing genes of distantly related species through forced pollinations, as well as radiation treatments to induce random mutations in seeds. Today virtually everything we eat is produced from seeds that we have genetically altered in one way or another.

Over the last twenty years, scientists and breeders have used GE to create crop varieties that thrive in extreme environments or can withstand attacks by pests and disease. Like the older conventional varieties, GE crops are genetically altered, but in a manner that introduces fewer genetic changes. Genetic engineering can also be used to insert genes from distantly related species, such as bacteria, directly into a plant.

Given that modern genetic engineering is similar to techniques that have served humanity well for thousands of years and that the risks of unintended consequences are similar whether the variety is derived from the processes of GE or conventional gene alteration, it should come as no surprise that the GE crops currently on the market are as safe to eat and safe for the environment as organic or conventional foods. That is the conclusion reached by diverse agricultural and food experts. There is broad consensus on this point among highly regarded science-based organizations in the United States and abroad, including the American Medical Association, the National Academy of Sciences, the World Health Organization, and European Commission Joint Research Centre. In the seventeen years since GE crops were first grown commercially, not a single instance of adverse health or environmental effects has been documented.

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EAST AFRICA: Food security a matter of serious concern

EAST AFRICA: Food security a matter of serious concern | BXW Control | Scoop.it

Dar es Salaam, October 22 -- A workshop was convened by the Economic and Social Research Foundation (ESRF) in collaboration with the Association of Strengthening Agriculture Research for Eastern Africa (ASARECA). The workshop attracted researchers, economists, journalists, statisticians and other stakeholders. Issues discussed included better use of data and information on root causes of food price volatility and its impact on local and regional markets.


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Uganda needs to adapt GMOs and biotechnology - HispanicBusiness.com

Uganda needs to adapt GMOs and biotechnology
HispanicBusiness.com
Some of them are fighting the "difficult" crop diseases like Banana Bacterial Wilt through genetic engineering.
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Farmers Urged to Adopt Biotech - AllAfrica.com

Farmers Urged to Adopt Biotech - AllAfrica.com | BXW Control | Scoop.it
Farmers Urged to Adopt Biotech
AllAfrica.com
"Only GM technology can save the banana from regional eradication by banana bacterial wilt. There is no other way to reliably protect it.
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Banana Bacterial Wilt Film, How it spreads and How to control it

This video documentary on BBW is based on work done by Kabarole Research and Resource Centre in Kabarole District of the Rwenzori sub region in Uganda. It sh...
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Rescooped by Denis Jjuuko from Aquaculture Directory
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MSU fisheries professor receives conservation award | Newburg Farm Equipment Blog

MSU fisheries professor receives conservation award | Newburg Farm Equipment Blog | BXW Control | Scoop.it
top: MSU fisheries professor receives conservation award - The Mississippi chapter of the American Fisheries... http://t.co/bXwxYrMlH7

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Banana Bacterial Wilt, How it spreads and how to control it - Complete Version

I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
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Identification, prevention and control of banana xanthomonas wilt disease (BXW)

A training video to help farmer identify symptoms, modes of spread and management options for banana xanthomonas wilt disease (BXW) in Central Africa. www.ci...
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On the Farm: Making fortune from Bananas

http://ntvuganda.co.ug/ The Banana locally known as matooke is a staple in many households, commonly grown around homesteads. The crop usually does not requi...
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New solution for streneous banana wilt - Simon Mugisha

In a bid to curb banana wilt that has caused the destruction of a major cash and food crop, a strategy dubbed Kick banana Bacterial Wilt out of Uganda, has b...
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Bananas and their future on BBC Radio 4 The Food Programme ...

Bananas and their future on BBC Radio 4 The Food Programme ... | BXW Control | Scoop.it
... being popular in West and Central Africa, Latin America, Brasil, India and Philippines. The medium sized one is and East Africa cooking banana, eaten as matoke, a steamed and mashed dish served with nearly every meal.
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African conference calls for new agricultural universities | AfricanBrains

African conference calls for new agricultural universities | AfricanBrains | BXW Control | Scoop.it
 [KAMPALA] East and Central African countries should establish a new generation of innovation-oriented agricultural universities that would help integrate research, training and extension services, a conference has agreed.

The conference called for more collaboration between research, training and extension service providers.

The recommendation came at the close of the first General Assembly of the Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa (ASARECA), held in Uganda last month (14–16 December).

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Scientific banana trial in the works to fight wilt in Kenya - The Standard Digital News

Scientific banana trial in the works to fight wilt in Kenya - The Standard Digital News | BXW Control | Scoop.it
Scientific banana trial in the works to fight wilt in Kenya
The Standard Digital News
Banana researchers are on course to start confined field trials of a new banana variety that is genetically engineered to resist bacterial wilt disease.
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GM bananas: from nutrition to disease resistance - Fresh Fruit Portal

GM bananas: from nutrition to disease resistance - Fresh Fruit Portal | BXW Control | Scoop.it
GM bananas: from nutrition to disease resistance Fresh Fruit Portal Initially focused on vitamin-rich genetically modified (GM) bananas for growers in Uganda, work has extended to India with disease resistance thrown into the mix, while Dale...
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Eye on Education Overview of Common Core State Standards Resources

Eye on Education Overview of Common Core State Standards Resources | BXW Control | Scoop.it
Eye On Education (RT@eyeoneducation: Resources for meeting the Common Core State Standards http://t.co/bxwRcYH70x #commoncore #ccss #ccchat #edchat”)...

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Uganda : Small market for hybrid bananas hurts farmers - Daily Monitor

Uganda : Small market for hybrid bananas hurts farmers - Daily Monitor | BXW Control | Scoop.it
Small market for hybrid bananas hurts farmers
Daily Monitor
With the development of the hybrid banana, the future of the banana growing in Uganda that looked bleak, became bright.

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ScienceDirect.com - Molecular Immunology - Oxidation matters: The ubiquitin proteasome system connects innate immune mechanisms with MHC class I antigen presentation

ScienceDirect.com - Molecular Immunology - Oxidation matters: The ubiquitin proteasome system connects innate immune mechanisms with MHC class I antigen presentation | BXW Control | Scoop.it
Oxidation matters: The UPS connects innate immune mechanisms with MHC class I antigen presentation http://t.co/BxW26ayH #immunoproteasome...

Via Gilbert C FAURE
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