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Why your boss wants to track your heart rate - Future of work

Why your boss wants to track your heart rate - Future of work | Business Trends | Scoop.it
Future of work,Technology, Wearable Tech, Internet of Things, Healthcare, Wearables, Workplace, Heart rates, tracking systems, Connectivity, Wearable Devices, Analytic
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Does A Sense Of Humor Mean #Winning? Lululemon Goes With The Flow

Does A Sense Of Humor Mean #Winning? Lululemon Goes With The Flow | Business Trends | Scoop.it
It seems that after Jimmy Kimmels' latest spoof, Lululemon took a new approach to being in the headlines and went with the flow by embracing it.
Jen Cohen Crompton's insight:

Will Lululemon's use of humor put them on the #winning side?? 

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Your Business Model Is Killing Innovation

Your Business Model Is Killing Innovation | Business Trends | Scoop.it

Last week, my partners and I were talking about a company that has asked for our guidance on how to develop a more innovative culture. 


Via Peter Verschuere
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Corinne Chauffrut Werner 's curator insight, November 7, 2013 4:05 AM

Business Rules
(for innovation)

Break rules and dreamOpen doors and listenTrust and be trustedSeek fairness, not advantageExperiment & iterate togetherErr, fail, and persistPay it forward

Business Rules
(for production)

Excel at your jobBe loyal to your teamWork with those you can depend onSeek a competitive edgeDo the job right the first timeStrive for perfectionReturn favors
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What You Can Learn From Kid President About Viral Video

What You Can Learn From Kid President About Viral Video | Business Trends | Scoop.it
Working in digital and social media, I have heard it about a thousand times: “I want this video to go viral.” It’s no surprise why brands would want to launch a video campaign. Statista…
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To Win at Marketing, Scrap Your Marketing Department and Hire a Data Geek (Infographic)

To Win at Marketing, Scrap Your Marketing Department and Hire a Data Geek (Infographic) | Business Trends | Scoop.it
Going forward, your marketing department should look more like your IT department.
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3-D printing adds new dimension to business innovation | NetworkWorld.com

3-D printing adds new dimension to business innovation | NetworkWorld.com | Business Trends | Scoop.it

3-D printing may have an image problem. It's sometimes seen as a hobbyist pursuit -- a fun way to build knickknacks from your living room desktop -- but a growing number of companies are giving serious thought to the technology to help get new ideas off the ground.

 

That's literally off the ground in aircraft maker Boeing's case. Thirty thousand feet in the air, some planes made by Boeing are outfitted with air duct components, wiring covers and other small, general parts that have been made via 3-D printing, or, as the process is known in industrial applications, additive manufacturing. The company also uses additive manufacturing with metal to produce prototype parts for form, fit and function tests.

 

Whether it's the living room or a corporate factory, the underlying principle of 3-D printing -- additive manufacturing -- is the same. It's different from traditional manufacturing techniques such as subtractive or formative manufacturing, which mainly rely on removing material through molding, drilling or grinding. Additive manufacturing instead starts from scratch and binds layers of material sequentially in extremely thin sheets, into a shape designed with 3-D modeling software.

 

Boeing has been conducting research and development in the area of additive manufacturing since 1997, but the company wants to scale up its processes in the years ahead so it can use the technology to build larger, structural components that can be widely incorporated into military and commercial aircraft.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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