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Focus Your Business Pitch on Yourself, Not Your Plan

Focus Your Business Pitch on Yourself, Not Your Plan | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:

"Passion and purpose" (how you personally are involved), "Resilience" (how  you were able to fight the unknown) and "Resource magnetizm" (The power you can mobilize to attract different resources) are key factors in general but also in the investors' pitch too...

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Professional coaching is a thought provoking & creative process inspiring clients to maximize their personal & professional potential - http://be-my-coach.eu
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Rescooped by Miklos Szilagyi from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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How AI Has Already Changed Your Life

How AI Has Already Changed Your Life | Business Coaching | Scoop.it

For some people, artificial intelligence still makes them feel a little…uneasy. It’s often depicted as sinister-looking robots who will take over our lives and our jobs, or even replace humanity. 

The reality is, we are already in an age in which AI is infused into our everyday lives in ways that augment rather than replace people. Digital assistants such as Cortana can find you the closest restaurant, dictate a text to your friend, manage your email inbox and even help you create more beautiful PowerPoint presentations.  Whether you realise it or not, AI is an integral part of all these interactions. And while it’s not something you can often see or touch, I bet you’re already experiencing the benefits of AI every day.

So, how does AI technology actually work? AI is a machine’s ability to recognise images and words, learn and reason in ways that are similar to people. Data is the fuel for AI, and our world is awash with data as our daily interactions are increasingly digital. AI uses sophisticated algorithms to sort through piles of data, spot patterns and make predictions – tasks that would be repetitive and time-consuming, if not practically impossible, for people to do manually. AI can do this work on our behalf and give us back more of life’s most precious commodity - time.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=AI

 


Via Gust MEES
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
“...AI is a machine’s ability to recognise images and words, learn and reason in ways that are similar to people. Data is the fuel for AI, and our world is awash with data as our daily interactions are increasingly digital...” - The AI is already makes a part of our daily life... it gives time for us to become acclimatized to it...
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Gust MEES's curator insight, March 30, 2:40 AM

For some people, artificial intelligence still makes them feel a little…uneasy. It’s often depicted as sinister-looking robots who will take over our lives and our jobs, or even replace humanity. 

The reality is, we are already in an age in which AI is infused into our everyday lives in ways that augment rather than replace people. Digital assistants such as Cortana can find you the closest restaurant, dictate a text to your friend, manage your email inbox and even help you create more beautiful PowerPoint presentations.  Whether you realise it or not, AI is an integral part of all these interactions. And while it’s not something you can often see or touch, I bet you’re already experiencing the benefits of AI every day.

So, how does AI technology actually work? AI is a machine’s ability to recognise images and words, learn and reason in ways that are similar to people. Data is the fuel for AI, and our world is awash with data as our daily interactions are increasingly digital. AI uses sophisticated algorithms to sort through piles of data, spot patterns and make predictions – tasks that would be repetitive and time-consuming, if not practically impossible, for people to do manually. AI can do this work on our behalf and give us back more of life’s most precious commodity - time.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=AI

 

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, March 31, 5:43 AM
Félünk (félünk?) a mesterséges intellingenciától, pedig különböző szintű megjelenési formáit full használjuk... az átalakulás, a változás folyamatos, az is lesz, hol lineáris, hol helyenként ugrásszerű, de hozzászokni már elkezdtünk... nem a távoli jövő az, amikor majd egyszerre csak ránk ugrik, mint egy tigris...:-)))
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The hidden voices of Theory U

Imagine having to face something scary or imagining a new possible future that you’re contemplating pursuing. How is your mind? If you’re anything like me, there’s one thing it’s not. Quiet. Usually…
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Voice of judgement (VoJ), voice of cynicism (VoC) and voice of fear (VoF)... the three inner voices... 

Each has a tendency to block something in us (or at least to make it difficult for us to act)... Generally when the action/decision/compassion are needed perhaps the most... E.g. when thinking on something a little bit scary or simply just on the future... 

Well, in Otto Scharmer's "Theory U"  these blocking processes are analysed too: VoJ blocks our mind (we use one of our "CD"s, one of our thinking/action/decision pattern...), VoC blocks our heart (i.e. our emotions, hence we'd rather evade) and VoF blocks our will (our drive for action)... 

We might be very accustomed to these voices and very often we do not even detect them and their effects... if we knew more about them, how they operate, we could detect the cause backwards/deduce the reason from the effect... The more of our energy goes astray (e.g. we are often very tired even if it is not justifiable), the more plausible that our inner voices have taken the power over us...   
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All Management Is Change Management

All Management Is Change Management | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Leaders should view change not as an occasional disruptor but as the very essence of the management job. Setting tough goals, establishing processes to reach them, carrying out those processes and carefully learning from them — these steps should characterize the unending daily life of the organization at every level. More companies need to describe their work in terms of where they are trying to go in the next month or next quarter or next year.

Via David Hain
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Sure... while all the difficulties remains how to do it... OK, it's a continuous "battle", that's all... 
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David Hain's curator insight, December 1, 2017 4:35 AM

Its not 'business as usual' or 'change management'. Change is the work!

Ian Berry's curator insight, December 1, 2017 4:32 PM
I like David Hain's insight that change is the work For me though only part of the story In terms of management today that's about processes and things associated. Change management is an oxymoron It's part of the hangover from the Industrial Revolution where people in power believe they could control people and things. They were wrong!
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Elon Musk speaks about the possible dangers of AI...

Elon Musk speaks about the possible dangers of AI... | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
+VIDEO. Deux ans après un premier appel, le patron de Tesla et plus de 100 experts de l’intelligenc
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Interesting points... always speaking about the loss of workplaces due to Ai-ing the production & services but there are other possibilities as well, really dangerous ones... what about e.g. when full AI stormtroopers are going to war?!
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We need to shine more light on algorithms so they can help reduce bias, not perpetuate it

We need to shine more light on algorithms so they can help reduce bias, not perpetuate it | Business Coaching | Scoop.it

Courts, banks, and other institutions are using automated data analysis systems to make decisions about your life. Let’s not leave it up to the algorithm makers to decide whether they’re doing it appropriately. ProPublica, a Pulitzer Prize–winning nonprofit news organization, had analyzed risk assessment software known as COMPAS. It is being used to forecast which criminals are most likely to ­reoffend. Guided by such forecasts, judges in courtrooms throughout the United States make decisions about the future of defendants and convicts, determining everything from bail amounts to sentences. When ProPublica compared COMPAS’s risk assessments for more than 10,000 people arrested in one Florida county with how often those people actually went on to reoffend, it discovered that the algorithm “correctly predicted recidivism for black and white defendants at roughly the same rate.” But when the algorithm was wrong, it was wrong in different ways for blacks and whites. Specifically, “blacks are almost twice as likely as whites to be labeled a higher risk but not actually re-offend.” And COMPAS tended to make the opposite mistake with whites: “They are much more likely than blacks to be labeled lower risk but go on to commit other crimes.” Things reviewed “Machine Bias” ProPublica, May 23, 2016 “COMPAS Risk Scales: Demonstrating Accuracy Equity and Predictive Parity” Northpointe, July 8, 2016 “Technical Response to Northpointe” ProPublica, July 29, 2016 “False Positives, False Negatives, and False Analyses: A Rejoinder to ‘Machine Bias’” Anthony Flores, Christopher Lowenkamp, and Kristin Bechtel August 10, 2016 Courts, banks, and other institutions are using automated data analysis systems to make decisions about your life. Let’s not leave it up to the algorithm makers to decide whether they’re doing it appropriately. 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Well, and it's only an example... we are guided/controlled/selected/rejected/etc. acc. to results of algorythms on many (if not all of the...) areas... i.e. we are finally submitted to programmers/coders final logic/thinking... if we are not able to check, monitor & veto on some meta-levels the working of these algirithms (are we guys?!), then, well, one thing remains: to pray...
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Hiring Mistake #1: Your Job Description is Worthless

Hiring Mistake #1: Your Job Description is Worthless | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
In my last post, I mentioned that I would take the Study we did within the Vistage/TEC CEO and Senior Executive Community on Hiring Failure before we

Via Barry Deutsch
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Good point!
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Barry Deutsch's curator insight, August 7, 2017 2:33 AM

One of the worst elements of the hiring process is the traditional and tribal reliance on job descriptions. They are worthless useless as a predictor and management tool for performance - as they are typically used in most organizations. There must be a better way!

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The Power of Rejection

The Power of Rejection | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Dear reader, today we have a special post - a guest post from Naomi. She has indeed written a masterpiece for you and this is her first blog. I have never met Naomi face to face. Our paths crossed as our common friend John Wheeler introduced us one to another, saying we might be a…
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Rejection as a resource, as a new starting point, as like more knowing what's around us, as like more owning what is useful to us & what helps us become our better version... solution focused thinking in its prime... beautiful...
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Rescooped by Miklos Szilagyi from Leadership Lite
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How to Win Influence and Keep It

How to Win Influence and Keep It | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
The power behind leadership can take several forms, and can gain its sustainability through several different routes. A look at three sources of earned power.

Via Kevin Watson
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Good metaphor...:-))) be good, trustworthy, accountable & empowering... (accountable & empowering are my substitution of likeable...)
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donhornsby's curator insight, May 10, 2017 1:58 PM
As leaders, we must master the art of influence if we expect to make a difference in this world.
 
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Psychology into economics: fast and frugal heuristics

Abstract The present essay focuses on the fast and frugal heuristics program set forth by Gerd Gigerenzer and his fellows. In particular it examines the contribution of Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996) ‘Reasoning the Fast and Frugal Way: Models of Bounded Rationality’. This essay, following the theoretical propositions and the empirical evidence of Gigerenzer and Goldstein, points out that simple cognitive mechanisms such as fast and frugal heuristics can be capable of successful performance in real world, without the need of satisfying the classical norms of rational inference.
https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/78162/3/MPRA_paper_78162.pdf


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Yeah... praise of intuition... in its place it's "the" thing... and then, lots of research and books speak about the foreseeable and/or accidental failures yielded by intuition... 
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Your Brain on Learning

Your Brain on Learning | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Most trainings fall down because we leave it up to the employee to go back and change their behavior when they go back to an environment that’s already rigged to have them execute the old habit,” she explained. “If they don’t have some intentionality, some chances to develop repetitions of doing it correctly, all the best intentions in the world will fall down.

Via David Hain
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
It's about the durable maintenability, or the proficiency of putting into practice the human development (training, coaching, etc.)... I would add four remarks: 

 1. It helps a lot if the leader/manager still before the development shows a genuine interest, even enthusiasm about the development process. Then the participant will know that it is important, he/she should be easier motivated because the workplace is waiting eagerly his/her new or more finetuned skill. 

2. During the training/coaching the facilitator should make it possible that the participants have an as passionate as possible experience, either at the theory as at the practice part. I know, it's not an easy task but without it the money for the development is just thrown out of the window because nobody is learning on purely cognitive basis. If the heart is not there it simply run through without any seeable imprint, if a sort of flow/joy wasn't there, the topics handled are quickly fading...

3. At the end, still during the practice a sort of agreement should be facilitated among the participants (or in case of a personal coaching with the leader/manager and/or with some coworkers) how they exactly will practice in the everyday working relationships what they learned. 

4. After the reinsertion somehow the environment and the participants themselves should be informed and asked for mutual accountability warning in case somebody would fall back into the old habits... 

And you know what? All these are just simple common sense, you do not need for any neuroscience smartness. Of course, it works only if you do it accordingly...
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David Hain's curator insight, April 12, 2017 2:48 AM

Are you following through on money you are spending on leadership coaching and development? Thats where you get the bangs for your buck!

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 12, 2017 1:26 PM

I also find that many training programs are excellent but when taken back to the job, leaders won't all the new practices to be used. Not it becomes a waste of money.

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The Problem with Saying “My Door Is Always Open”

The Problem with Saying “My Door Is Always Open” | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Leaders need to do more to encourage candor.
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Yeah... it's too easy to say that, and thinking, "I'm an approachable, open person... if they do not come that's their problem... I have told them..." ...and there is another problem with this 24/7 invitation: if they take it really seriously, you would have no time to think, to plan undisturbingly... Either way: it's not a good idea... there are more to be close/open to your reports, leave this ancien slogan alone...
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Us versus Them: Reframing Resistance to Change

Us versus Them: Reframing Resistance to Change | Business Coaching | Scoop.it

Change champions tend to pay attention to the upside of their future vision and the downside of today’s status quo. For example, those who are passionate about customers are hyper-focused on building relationships for the long term. To them, resistors seem greedy or blind.

Conversely, resistors pay attention to the downside of the change and the upside of the current state. They see the risks. When change champions refuse to discuss an issue, resistors assume they are hopelessly naive or sinister actors trying to pull the wool over everyone’s eyes. To them, it can seem fiscally reckless to divert attention from the financial aspects of the business to softer issues such as customer experience. Which of them is right? “They both are,” says Jacobs. “But each is only half-right.”

In the worst-case scenario, “us versus them” thinking devolves into factions that compete but never really engage. 

The solution is to reframe how we think about resistance. Rather than assuming critical thinkers are resistors, we would do better to treat them as guardians. Guardians see what needs to be protected, and the trust that can be destroyed by a broken promise or a shortcut. Who else will ask the hard questions? 


Via David Hain
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Guardians or fact/idea-checkers who can have a very valuable contribution... and when they feel that their contribution is seen as important and valuable, the reframing could be successful...
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David Hain's curator insight, February 3, 2017 2:56 AM

A very sensible way to defuse resistance and to enrol critical friends rather than critics!

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17 Strategies to Overcome Burnout and Achieve Balance For Life | Succeed Without Burnout

17 Strategies to Overcome Burnout and Achieve Balance For Life | Succeed Without Burnout | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
The secret to the developing strategies to overcome burnout and achieve balance for life is to focus on the good habits to develop, not bad ones you need to
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
"...Burnout is not caused by over-commitment as most people think. Burnout is caused by a lack of commitment to some very important aspects of life. Those areas include our health, our relationship, our finances and our spiritual well-being..."
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Three Things Recruiters No Longer Look For (And Three They Still Do)

Three Things Recruiters No Longer Look For (And Three They Still Do) | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Is job-hopping really OK? Do you still need a cover letter? We talked to the experts to find out what matters in hiring.
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
The (almost) obsolete list: 
1. Your cover letter. – It’s your CV what they are checking… 
2. Where you went to school. – “you want to dial up the skills . . . those things jump out far more than your grad school.” 
3. Where you used to work. – Well, it depends… but ““We’re seeing more cross-pollination among industries than ever before,” 

The new list: 
1. Your research chops. - “…now that anybody can easily look up the going rates for specific roles, levels of experience, and geographical regions on sites like Glassdoor, PayScale, and Indeed.com, failing to benchmark yourself can look sloppy.” & “do the research on the recruiters you will be talking to” so you can ask smarter questions about their needs and objectives during your interview. At a minimum, it’s now pretty much expected that you’ll have checked out your interviewer’s LinkedIn profile ahead of time the same way they’ve definitely checked out yours. 
2. Too much job-hopping (in most cases) – but “it depends”… 
3. How you talk about your career - control the narratives about their careers. “A job seeker has to be able to tell their story and tell how one thing relates to another,”
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How to Be a Leader Without Having to Act Like One

How to Be a Leader Without Having to Act Like One | Business Coaching | Scoop.it

It's been largely assumed that to run a successful business today, good leadership is required. But it's not the end of the world for leaders who worry that they're low on charisma or can't stir employees' hearts and minds. Maybe they don't particularly want to, and that's OK too.

 

Sometimes, it's more effective for employees to be more loyal to the work instead of being more loyal to the leader. After all, the end goal should be to keep employees engaged and productive by charging them to solve compelling problems.

 

First, it's important to understand the difference between an appealing boss and challenging work. A recent Harvard Business Review article found that employees at Facebook were more likely to quit because of their work--and not because of a "horrible" boss. The authors--three HR executives and Wharton professor Adam Grant--had spent years studying Facebook. When the social media giant started tracking employee exits, "all bets were on managers," the authors wrote. Turns out, employees left "when their job wasn't enjoyable, their strengths weren't being used, and they weren't growing in their careers."


Via The Learning Factor
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Well, I am not so sure about this problem-led leader thing but the video at the end is a must-see...:-)))
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The 12 Stages of Burnout, According to Psychologists

The 12 Stages of Burnout, According to Psychologists | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
How bad is your burnout? Here's the scientific answer.
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
About the burnout and how to avoid it very briefly and in everyday language... There are stages and there are differences within each stage, therefore it would be impossible to say what to do in actual cases... this might help to identify where somebody is on the scale, if at all he/she started to realise that the danger is around him/her... and if you think that you are on the burnout bandwagon, let it be any of the stages, it is advisable to turn to experts...
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Molecules react to their environment

Molecules react to their environment | Business Coaching | Scoop.it

Does adaptation lead to a molecular Darwinism? Le Chatelier’s principle is neither hard to state nor to understand. But it’s kind of hard to find the right words. It’s typically expressed as something like: ‘If a dynamic equilibrium is disturbed by changing the conditions, the position of equilibrium moves to counteract the change.’ But there is a clear implication of intentionality here: it’s as though the system is determined to keep its balance. Sometimes, Le Chatelier’s principle is more or less equated with homeostasis in physiology – the maintenance of a steady state in a changing environment. Some homeostasis, such as pH regulation, does indeed involve the kind of shift in chemical equilibria described by Le Chatelier’s principle. The confusing thing is that biological homeostasis is also a survival mechanism and therefore connected to Darwinian adaptation. We have evolved sweat glands, yet the regulation of body temperature by sweating can be explained by purely physical laws. What this really means is that ‘adaptation to the environment’ has more than one meaning. It can refer to the gradual accommodation to a niche explained by natural selection in self-replicating systems, or to the instantaneous response to fluctuating environmental conditions due to physicochemical principles. These two processes interact, but one might have thought we could keep them distinct. After seeing a paper by Jordan Horowitz and Jeremy England of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US, I’m not so sure.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Highly sophisticated piece (on the base (and extrapolating from) of a specified chemical experiment) about 2 things: (1) whether evolution is explaining evolution or some more basic physical/chemical/biological processes are also there to act and (for me at least) (2) whether equilibrium states are so general and universal we think they are... About point (2)... just thinking about it some days whether human race is not being left behind by the technological environment (in work and in privat life) it created itself on the first place... It seems to me that we are just living the moment of finally and irreversibly leaving our possibility to ever find a new balance in our life... not because we are individually not capable of finding it but because our constitution's incapability...
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An algorithm trained on emoji knows when you’re being sarcastic on Twitter

An algorithm trained on emoji knows when you’re being sarcastic on Twitter | Business Coaching | Scoop.it

Understanding sarcasm could help AI fight racism, abuse, and harassment. The researchers originally aimed to develop a system capable of detecting racist posts on Twitter. But they soon realized that the meaning of many messages couldn’t be properly understood without some understanding of sarcasm. The algorithm uses deep learning, a popular machine-learning technique that relies on training a very large simulated neural network to recognize subtle patterns using a large amount of data. The secret to training this algorithm was that many tweets already use something like a labeling system for emotional content: emoji. Once they took advantage of this to help the system read tweets for emotion in general, the researchers had a head start in teaching it to recognize sarcasm.


Via Alessandro Cerboni
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Wow... this algorithm is better to spot sarcasm, i.e. complex emotion in written text through emojis than the control human test group... wow...
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Is “nudge management” the new scientific management approach?

Is “nudge management” the new scientific management approach? | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
A recent journal article isn't telling the full story.

Via Kasia Hein-Peters
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How to Improve at Work When You’re Not Getting Feedback

How to Improve at Work When You’re Not Getting Feedback | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
A list of the skills that most strongly influence performance reviews.
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
...that is, in most of the cases... why on earth is it so difficult to give feedback?! Of course, I know... arrogance ("they are here for working, aren't they?! Why to do so much fuss about this?!"), real or felt incompetence (impostor syndrome: they are just happy that still nobody hasn't discovered that the coat/post is too much, too complicated for them)... we could reengineer this whole thing backwards: those leaders/managers who do not in a demonstrable way do informal/development-focused feedback or rather feed forward, should be dismissed... by bosses who also not strong in giving useful informal feedbacks?! Hmmm... it looks like a wrong cycle... or, one of the necessary & sufficient operating characteristic of a good/result-oriented boss that the people reporting them do not fear what he/she think about them... iit's an effectiveness issue
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Information Aversion

Abstract 
We propose a theory of inattention solely based on preferences, absent cognitive limitations or external costs of information. Under disappointment aversion, agents are intrinsically information averse. In a consumption-savings problem, we study how information averse agents cope with their fear of information, to make better decisions: they acquire information at infrequent intervals only, and inattention increases when volatility is high, consistent with the empirical evidence. Adding state-dependent alerts following sharp downturns improves welfare, despite the additional endogenous information costs. Our framework accommodates a broad range of applications, suggesting our approach can explain many observed features of decision under uncertainty
https://www.tse-fr.eu/sites/default/files/TSE/documents/doc/wp/2017/wp_tse_779.pdf  

Via Alessandro Cerboni
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
The monkeys don"t hear, don't see, don't speak... where your attention is there you have your focus... and all the other aspects are in the Moon... yeah... sure...
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Empty Why Do Most Interviews Have A Low Correlation to Success?

Empty Why Do Most Interviews Have A Low Correlation to Success? | Business Coaching | Scoop.it

Acting in the interview does not correlate to success.


Via Barry Deutsch
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
I just go one step further.... Have you met guys who are brilliant on gamification (in the old times simple training games) and they are just not there for real work? They love playing but they hate working... more common than you just think now...
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Barry Deutsch's curator insight, April 24, 2017 2:45 AM

Have you ever hired someone that said all the right things in the interview (like an actor or actress) – yet fell flat on their face after they came aboard?

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Here Are the Ages You Peak at Everything Throughout Life

Here Are the Ages You Peak at Everything Throughout Life | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Sometimes older is better.
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“Positive thinking” has turned happiness into a duty and a burden, says a Danish psychologist

“Positive thinking” has turned happiness into a duty and a burden, says a Danish psychologist | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Everyone wants you to be happy: Self-help books dish out advice on how to stop worrying, boost happiness, and banish negative thoughts; bosses want to see smiling enthusiasm in the workplace; and the only way to respond to “how are you?” is with a joyful “great!” But according to Svend Brinkmann, a psychology professor at Denmark'
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
When something is too much on one side there will always come the other side as well... when something valuable is profanised by too many, too superficial people, there will come somebody saying: stop that nonsense... Waiting for the book...:-)))
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Elearning: innovate or keep it simple? | Part 1: Introduction | PT Learning blog

Elearning: innovate or keep it simple? | Part 1: Introduction | PT Learning blog | Business Coaching | Scoop.it
Miklos Szilagyi's insight:
Some e-learning ideas... "...balance between innovation and simplicity..."
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