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Getting ahead of the curve in business
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Can the private sector misbehave its way to sustainability?

Can the private sector misbehave its way to sustainability? | Business change | Scoop.it
This was U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres’ plea to business during his opening of the High-Level Meeting of Caring for Climate, held during COP23 — the annual U.N. climate conference — in Bonn earlier this month. Generally, when the words "misbehave" and "business" appear together, we expect to hear about business behaving badly. But for the secretary-general, this was an enthusiastic call to action for companies everywhere to disrupt "business-as-usual" on climate action and call on governments to ramp up policy ambition.

Via Peter Verschuere
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Head of UN promotes disruption for sustainability!

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5 Hard Truths About Being A Disruptor

5 Hard Truths About Being A Disruptor | Business change | Scoop.it
Innovation is happening at an unprecedented rate. It feels like technology is advancing faster than ever because it actually is. It’s happening in nearly every industry, from biotech to diamond mining, and not only are we seeing great strides when it comes to efficiency, affordability and access, we’re also seeing total disruption. New models are systematically uprooting the way we think and behave.

The term “disruptor” has developed a unicorn status in Silicon Valley. If you didn’t know better, you might think the Race to Disrupt was an extreme sport. I myself have been called a disruptor for removing sweeteners from flavored water and bringing attention to the epidemic of sugar consumption in the beverage industry. While I’ll admit I don’t hate it, I have to say: being a disruptor is not all glory. There are a few things you should understand about disruption. Here’s how to turn the world upside down.
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Confessions of an innovator trying to turn an industry upside down...

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Peter Senge Presentation

Peter Senge's presentation from the 2012 Better by Design CEO Summit.

 

Worth while listening to at least twice. 


Via Anne Caspari
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Preparing for the Next Disruption

Preparing for the Next Disruption | Business change | Scoop.it
The Uncertainty Capability: The Secret to Preparing for the Next Disruption

Answering this question is important on both a personal and organizational level — and regardless of whether you are a technology company or an enterprise. The reason is that the critical capability is not the identification of the next disruptive force, but rather the ability to rapidly adapt to whatever disruption may come.

The reason that many industry leaders missed the significance of the Internet is that we are all subject to something called the “curse of knowledge.” Coined by a Stanford graduate student, it simply means that once we know something to be true, it becomes very difficult to both imagine that anybody else doesn’t know this truth and to break free of the box that the knowledge creates around us.

The current incarnations of Internet-fueled technologies have become our new reality. We understand how it works, we have made plans for the future based on that understanding and are therefore naturally hesitant to accept anything that may challenge that preconception. It is the curse of knowledge in action.
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Useful musings on how to recognise the next global game changer...

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How to survive disruption

How to survive disruption | Business change | Scoop.it

Maxwell Wessel is a fellow at the Forum for Growth and Innovation and a senior researcher at Harvard Business School. Clayton M. Christensen is the Kim B Clark Professor of Business Administration at HBS.

Disruptive innovations are like missiles launched at your business. For 20 years we’ve described missile after missile that took aim and annihilated its target: Napster, Amazon and the Apple Store devastated Tower Records and Musicland; digital photography made film practically obsolete.

And all along we’ve prescribed a single response to ensure that when the dust settles, you’ll still have a viable business: develop a disruption of your own before it’s too late to reap the rewards of participation in new, high-growth markets – as Apple did with the iPod, iTunes, the iPad and the iPhone. That prescription is, if anything, even more imperative in an increasingly volatile world.


Via The Learning Factor
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