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10 Principles of Strategy through Execution

10 Principles of Strategy through Execution | Business change | Scoop.it
Any company can follow the same path as these successful firms, and an increasing number of companies are doing just that. If you join them, you will need to cultivate the ability to translate the strategic into the everyday. This means linking strategy and execution closely together by creating distinctive, complex capabilities that set your company apart, and applying them to every product and service in your portfolio. These capabilities combine all the elements of execution — technology, human skills, processes, and organizational structures — to deliver your company’s chosen value proposition.

How do you accomplish this on a day-to-day basis? How do you get the strategists and implementers in your company to work together effectively? These 10 principles, derived from our experience at Strategy&, can help you avoid common pitfalls and accelerate your progress. For companies that truly embrace strategy through execution, principles like these become a way of life.
David Hain's insight:

Strategy/Execution. Most of my clients treat this as either/or. Working out how to make it 'and' is a critical differentiator. 

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Ian Berry's curator insight, February 7, 5:03 PM
Another good 10 actions I think strategy is overrated It's much simple that most people give credit to and can be described with a bit of discipline in one sentence
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The cornerstones of large-scale technology transformation

The cornerstones of large-scale technology transformation | Business change | Scoop.it

Even companies that devise sound strategies are likely to encounter two formidable obstacles to using advanced technologies at a transformative scale. The first challenge is the sheer number and breadth of technology solutions required to truly transform an enterprise, often in the hundreds. The second one might be called the “last-mile” challenge: redesigning a company’s processes to capture the value of new technologies, in line with their strategic goals. Both sound technical, but they play out far from the traditional IT organization and create headaches for the business leaders who will need to guide their people toward new patterns of thinking and operating.

A playbook for overcoming these challenges is starting to emerge across industries. In this article, we’ll explore five cornerstone practices underpinning the progress of successful companies:

Develop technology road maps that strategically focus investments needed to reinvent their legacy businesses and create new digital ones.
Train managers to recognize new opportunities and build in-house capabilities to deliver technologies.
Establish a modern technology environment to support rapid development of new solutions.
Overhaul data strategy and governance to ensure data are reliable, accessible, and continuously enriched to make them more valuable.
Focus relentlessly on capturing the strategic value from technology by driving rapid changes in the operating model.

David Hain's insight:

Th efuture involves significant leverage form continuously emerging techology enhancement - but how do you get thwat right. McKinsey on their latest insights.

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Managing business growth strategies | McKinsey

Managing business growth strategies | McKinsey | Business change | Scoop.it
Innovation and growth are often lumped together as management concepts, for good reason: it’s self-evident that innovation drives growth, and conspicuous fast growers often benefit from high-profile innovations. Our research, however, suggests growth-minded companies stand to benefit by disaggregating the two concepts. There are, in fact, multiple paths to growth, and the most common growth characteristics among above-average growers often aren’t related to innovation. Significant as well, companies aspiring to the highest levels of growth need to sequence their initiatives carefully. Put differently: you probably can’t do everything at once.
David Hain's insight:

There's more than one way to achieve growth, and the best achievers use more than one!

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What The C-Suite Must Do To Make The Whole Firm Agile

What The C-Suite Must Do To Make The Whole Firm Agile | Business change | Scoop.it

A just-released report entitled “The Business Agility Report (1st Edition, 2018)" by the Business Agility Institute (BAI) illustrates some of the dimensions of the changes under way, particularly the role of the C-suite and the progress towards implementing organizational agility. 

The BAI survey shows that progress towards business agility correlates positively with the level of leadership of the Agile journey. Not surprisingly, the higher the level of leadership, the greater the progress towards business agility.

David Hain's insight:

Leadership is critical to the journey towards agile organisation. New survey shows the state of play.

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Behavioural Government: A major new initiative from the Behavioural Insights Team

Behavioural Government: A major new initiative from the Behavioural Insights Team | Business change | Scoop.it
When we present our work or appear on panels, we’re often asked the same question: “But doesn’t government itself suffer from cognitive biases?”

It’s an issue close to our hearts, given our origins in government. We first highlighted it in the MINDSPACE report in 2010 (see p55) but, in the eight years since, the issue has received only a small amount of attention from academics, think tanks, and practitioners.

We hope to change that. For the last 18 months, we have been working with the Institute for Government to examine how cognitive biases affect government policy making – with a particular focus on how these biases make it more likely that policies do not get wide enough input or challenge.

We will present our findings in a series of blog posts over the coming months, with the full report due to launch in June. After that, we hope to work with governments to implement and test our recommendations.

Here is a preview of the framework we developed for the report. It describes how eight cognitive biases can affect three core activities of policy making: noticing, deliberating, and executing. The report brings these ideas to life with real-world examples.
David Hain's insight:

Introductory article to a useful blog by government behavioural specialists - the people who 'nudge'. It's about policy, but much of the same applies to strategy.

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3 Tactics That Will Improve Execution Immediately 

3 Tactics That Will Improve Execution Immediately  | Business change | Scoop.it
Execution is the lifeblood of your business.

The whole reason you’re in business is because you decided to do or create something that customers find valuable. But just doing isn’t enough to keep the dream alive. Effective execution makes the difference between your blue sky outcome and watching your vision crashland with a cloud of missed opportunities.  

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase, once said, “I’d rather have a first-rate execution and second-rate strategy, anytime, than a brilliant idea and mediocre management.” Jamie knew something that evades most leadership: the cost of missed commitments and poor execution is much more severe than an imperfect strategy. According to a study by Marakon Associates, which surveyed senior executives from 197 companies worldwide, “breakdowns in execution” are responsible for the loss of  as much as 40% of any strategy’s potential value. Missed commitments are the building blocks of poor execution. With each missed mark–no matter how insignificant–issues of customer satisfaction, productivity, profits, and reputation quickly snowball.

So how do you tap into that dream-sustaining lifeblood and avoid missed commitments and the pitfalls of poor execution? These three tactics:
David Hain's insight:

Turns out that great execution is mainly good management!

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All about Network Effects 

All about Network Effects  | Business change | Scoop.it
Network effects. It’s one of the most important concepts for business in general and especially for tech businesses, as it’s the key dynamic behind many successful software-based companies. Understanding network effects not only helps build better products, but it helps build moats and protect software companies against competitors’ eating away at their margins.

Yet what IS a network effect? How do we untangle the nuances of ‘network effects’ with ‘marketplaces’ and ‘platforms’? What’s the difference between network effects, virality, supply-side economies of scale? And how do we know a company has network effects?

Most importantly, what questions can entrepreneurs and product managers ask to counter the wishful thinking and sometimes faulty assumption behind the belief that “if we build it, they will come” … and instead go about more deterministically creating network effects in their business? Because it’s not a winner-take-all market by accident.
David Hain's insight:

How to master network effects to maximise change effectiveness. Lots of solid knowledge here.

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Ten Agile Axioms That Make Managers Anxious

Ten Agile Axioms That Make Managers Anxious | Business change | Scoop.it
In June 2018,  a time when “Agile at Scale” is emblazoned on the front cover of Harvard Business Review, the management journal with quasi-papal status, the era when managers could confidently ridicule agile management practices is fading fast. Instead, most managers have themselves grasped the need to be agile: a recent Deloitte survey of more than 10,000 business leaders across 140 countries revealed that nearly all surveyed respondents (94%) report that “agility and collaboration” are critical to their organization’s success. Yet only 6% say that they are “highly agile today.” So, what’s the problem? Why the 88% gap between aspiration and actuality

David Hain's insight:

Agile is trendy, for sure - but is it too easy to say and too hard to do? Maybe because, as Steve Denning suggests, agile is a mindset, not a process?

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Have you tested your strategy lately? | McKinsey 

Have you tested your strategy lately? | McKinsey  | Business change | Scoop.it
Let’s face it: the basic principles that make for good strategy often get obscured. Sometimes the explanation is a quest for the next new thing—natural in a field that emerged through the steady accumulation of frameworks promising to unlock the secret of competitive advantage.2 In other cases, the culprit is torrents of data, reams of analysis, and piles of documents that can be more distracting than enlightening.

Ultimately, strategy is a way of thinking, not a procedural exercise or a set of frameworks. To stimulate that thinking and the dialogue that goes along with it, we developed a set of tests aimed at helping executives assess the strength of their strategies. We focused on testing the strategy itself (in other words, the output of the strategy-development process), rather than the frameworks, tools, and approaches that generate strategies, for two reasons. First, companies develop strategy in many different ways, often idiosyncratic to their organizations, people, and markets. Second, many strategies emerge over time rather than from a process of deliberate formulation.3
There are ten tests on our list, and not all are created equal. The first—“will it beat the market?”—is comprehensive. The remaining nine disaggregate the picture of a market-beating strategy, though it’s certainly possible for a strategy to succeed without “passing” all nine of them. This list may sound more complicated than the three Cs or the five forces of strategy.4 But detailed pressure testing, in our experience, helps pinpoint more precisely where the strategy needs work, while generating a deeper and more fruitful strategic dialogue.
David Hain's insight:

Useful strategy audit or diagnostic.

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Coming of Age Digitally

Based on a global survey of more than 4,300 managers, executives, and analysts and 17 interviews with executives and thought leaders, MIT Sloan Management Review and Deloitte’s1 fourth annual study of digital business shows that the digital business environment is fundamentally different from the traditional one. Digitally maturing companies recognize the differences and are evolving how they learn and lead in order to adapt and succeed in a rapidly changing market. This year’s research provides some important insights into how companies are adapting to a digital business environment:
David Hain's insight:

The digital leadership landscape, as reported by MIT/Deloitte.

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Thinking about "transformation" beyond the digital

Thinking about "transformation" beyond the digital | Business change | Scoop.it
It's time to step beyond the digital in order to succeed in the rapid state of innovation we're all experiencing.

It's time, that is, to change the way we think about the value of the people in our organizational ecosystems by empowering them to rapidly respond to this change—and by providing the necessary skills and tools for becoming fluent in the critical task of engaging with change. Last November, when interviewed on CNBC's Squawk box, Red Hat president and CEO Jim Whitehurst said: "We found that when projects typically fail, it is usually not the technology, but has much more to do with the way companies operate." Jim went on to say that companies looking to transform the ways they work must examine their cultures, processes, and systems.
David Hain's insight:

The future may be digital, but people are the operating system that will determine its success!

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Don Tapscott: smart contracts will change the nature of firms —

Don Tapscott: smart contracts will change the nature of firms — | Business change | Scoop.it

We think blockchain is leading to a change in the nature of the firm, in its deep architecture: by moving assets around in this decentralized way, companies and industries are going to look more like networks, and that has profound implications or this audience,” said Tapscott. Even the nature of corporate competition may change, as enterprises realize they have more to gain from distributing data and encouraging the flow of digital assets than siloing and hoarding them.

But to truly realize the potential of blockchain, corporate leaders will have to rise to the occasion. “Paradigm shifts involve dislocation, conflict, confusion, uncertainty. New paradigms are nearly always received with coolness, even mockery or hostility. Those with vested interests fight the change. The shift demands such a different view of things that established leaders are often last to be won over, if at all,” Tapscott concluded.

David Hain's insight:

Blockchain is coming - and it's going to make a big difference...

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3 steps to creating participative strategy processes in organizations

3 steps to creating participative strategy processes in organizations | Business change | Scoop.it
Some of my most interesting work in in helping clients create effective processes for participative strategy. The traditional approach to strategy is that it is generated in the executive suite or by highly-paid consultants, then it is communicated to staff, usually rather ineffectively.

There is an increasing recognition that many people across the organization have invaluable insights into industry change, competition, client requirements, innovation and other issues that will help shape strategy. The challenge is in establishing processes that enable broad-based participation in a useful way, tapping ideas and generating positive energy for change.

In some cases, for example as I helped a global real-estate development company to implement, this can be framed in a fun competition format, assisting teams to generate visions of where the company can go. In other cases, a formal process can be created to expose staff across the company to strategic issues, then generating, capturing, filtering, and applying their insights to corporate strategy, as I did for a large financial services company.

Here is an excerpt from Chapter 7 of my book Living Networks providing some of the broader issues to address in implementing participative strategy.
David Hain's insight:

So many so-called strategies are top-down, mostly completely ignored by everyone else. But it doesn't have to be that way, says futurist Ross Dawson...

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Why sensemaking will save agile?

Complex environments represent a continuous challenge for sensemaking in organizations. Continuous ambiguity exerts continuous pressures on organizations to modify their patterns of interaction, information flow and decision making. Organizations struggle to address situations that are precarious, explanations that are equivocal and paradoxical, and cognitive dilemmas of all kinds. This creates a demand for innovative approaches in sensemaking. Since agility is what is required in navigating complexity, we can call these new approaches “agile sensemaking.”
David Hain's insight:

This plea for a new way for organisations to organise makes sense to me, although I'm not surety agile branding will help to take root.

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The Blitzscaling Basics

The Blitzscaling Basics | Business change | Scoop.it
When a startup matures to the point where it has a killer product, a clear and sizable market, and a robust distribution channel, it has the opportunity to become a “scaleup” — a world-changing company that touches millions or even billions of lives. How do startups evolve into scaleups? In a word, by blitzscaling.

Blitzscaling is what we call both the general framework and the specific techniques that allow companies to achieve massive scale at incredible speed. If you’re growing at a rate that is so much faster than your competitors that it makes you feel uncomfortable, then hold on tight, you might be blitzscaling!
David Hain's insight:

Blitzscaling - a new jargon to me, but because of a new book this concept (think Amazon) is likely to get lots of airtime this year.

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Marcelle Smart's curator insight, October 11, 11:18 AM
For the reading list!
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A CEO’s guide to reenergizing the senior team | McKinsey

A CEO’s guide to reenergizing the senior team | McKinsey | Business change | Scoop.it
In addition to the impact that fear has on how people interpret events, cognitive errors can lead even the most talented executives to deny otherwise clear evidence that times have really changed. Until recently, for example, several key members of a global semiconductor company’s senior team were reporting to their CEO that the present downturn was little different from other recessions they had experienced throughout their careers in this highly cyclical industry. A revenue drop of more than 50 percent over two quarters didn’t change their conviction. Some of their comments to the CEO could populate a textbook list of cognitive errors underlying denial:

“We just got an order last week, so things are turning”—a classic example of the availability heuristic
“This feels just like the last downturn; we’ll come back eventually”—an anchoring error
“My team agrees this will resolve itself”—the bandwagon effect
“I found three different studies that support my view that this is a temporary downturn”—the confirmation bias
“We need to study this more before we act irrationally”—the information bias
“If we do the things we usually do in a downturn, everything will be OK”—the optimism bias
David Hain's insight:

Useful article about signs that execs are struggling with change - and what can be done about reframing that.

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7 Essential Insights Normally Missed in Culture Change Efforts

7 Essential Insights Normally Missed in Culture Change Efforts | Business change | Scoop.it
This milestone post is a salute to passionate and experienced culture and performance change agents. You understand the power of culture in organizations and the challenge, frustration, restlessness, and exhilaration inevitably linked to intentional culture-related action. We’re living in the absolute best time in history to be involved in meaningful culture change. Culture is finally a topic of discussion in most organizations, and we need to make the most of it.

I adjusted my plan for this post during a recent trip to Washington, DC. I was going to write a general “how-to” post, but that changed during an early-morning run by the Washington Monument. I saw the flags at half-staff due to the recent Santa Fe High School shooting in Texas and started thinking about the incredibly challenging culture-related issues in organizations and society as a whole. I thought: “It’s going to take every bit of experience and knowledge to tackle these issues, and a general ‘how-to guide’ barely touches the surface of what we need.” I shifted my focus to zero in on details often missed in culture-related change efforts, even by experienced change agents.

Unless you are some sort of crazy unicorn, we all can benefit from learning from others, especially with something as challenging as shifting or evolving culture. We spend so much time trying to understand the stories and examples from great cultures or listening to the latest inspiring keynote, but we rarely dive into the messy culture realities and specific approaches to change. These seven insights will, hopefully, add to your experience in some new and impactful ways.
David Hain's insight:

Perceptive insights from Tim Kuppler on what gets in the way of culture change.

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What digital transformation isn’t – Tim Allan

I have been involved in a number of transformation projects in government and the private sector, across health and taxation, publishing, education and media. Throughout these projects, I’ve worked with many many great people and it was a privilege to work with them.
I can’t think of a scenario where the perfect digital transformation occurred. It’s a messy process. it’s hard to expect something disruptive to follow a typical trajectory every time, and be the same for every organisation. When a ‘digital transformation’ agenda is set, the organisational challenges it poses are usually (in my experience) greeted (on the surface) with optimism.
Looking back, I can recognise in previous projects many points where transformation was failing. Sometimes it’s after-the-fact recognition (usually from a place of more experience, where you think “we didn’t do that right”). Sometimes recognition happened at the time. Sometimes the failure is small, other times it is massive.
There are some common threads that I have drawn together from these projects. These threads are recurring events, people and processes that seem to symbolise the failure of transformation.
David Hain's insight:

Authoritative view from the field on what makes digital transformation work, and what to guard against.

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Treat Strategy as a Journey, not an Annual Management Junket 

Treat Strategy as a Journey, not an Annual Management Junket  | Business change | Scoop.it
I regularly hear business leaders complain about wanting to reallocate resources to attractive growth opportunities but discovering those resources are as sticky as glue, or finding their efforts at bold strategies sandbagged by risk-averse managers. Corporate politics, cognitive biases, the sway of individual incentives—such challenges have long plagued strategy development, but while they are intractable, they are not insurmountable.

Over the past few months, my colleagues Martin and Chris and I have explored the social dynamics that undermine decisions and breed incrementalism, and ways in which companies can use empirical benchmarks to determine the odds of their strategies succeeding. We’ve also laid out the types of big moves most likely to bring major performance boosts. But the question that remains in many executives’ minds is, “What does all this mean for how I run my strategy process and lead my team?”

There are eight shifts you can make to address this dilemma. These are practical changes you can start implementing tomorrow morning which, applied together, will enable you to change what happens in your strategy room.

Over the coming weeks, we will explain them one by one, starting with…

Shift 1: From annual planning…to strategy as a journey
David Hain's insight:

Strategy as a journey, emergent and iterative - it's the only way that makes sense given the inter-connectedness of today's world.

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Company organization in the age of urgency 

Company organization in the age of urgency  | Business change | Scoop.it
Across industries, barely half of the top performers sustain their leadership position over the course of a decade, according to research by our colleagues in McKinsey’s Strategy Practice. The challenges in maintaining dominance are not new; even sectors that digitization has not consigned to oblivion have seen flagships such as Delta Airlines, General Motors, and Owens Corning move from the top into Chapter 11 and then back into leadership positions again.

But of course, technology is changing everything. As digitization, advanced analytics, and artificial intelligence (AI) sweep across industries and geographies, they aren’t just reshaping the competitive landscape; they’re redefining the organizational imperative: adapt or die. The average large firm reorganizes every two to three years, and the average reorganization takes more than 18 months to implement. Wait and see is not an option; it’s a death sentence.

As a result, companies are beginning to experiment with increasingly radical approaches. We’re struck by a commonality among those who get it right: they create adaptive, fast-moving organizations that can respond quickly and flexibly to new opportunities and challenges as they arise. In doing so, they’re moving intelligent decision making to the front lines. That’s in sharp contrast to the standard, “safer” modus operandi of capturing data, sending it up a hierarchal chain, centrally analyzing it, and sending guidance back. Several of these forward-thinking organizations now starkly describe their decision making as being pushed to the “edges”—to and beyond employees, past the organization’s four walls, and out to consumers and partners. The process functions more like a network and less like a chain of command.
David Hain's insight:

Changing at the speed of digital - some McKinsey analysis of what to try out.

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The 25% Revolution--How Big Does a Minority Have to Be to Reshape Society?

The 25% Revolution--How Big Does a Minority Have to Be to Reshape Society? | Business change | Scoop.it
Social change—from evolving attitudes toward gender and marijuana to the rise of Donald Trump to the emergence of the Black Lives Matter and #MeToo movements—is a constant. It is also mysterious, or so it can seem. For example, “How exactly did we get here?” might be asked by anyone who lived through decades of fierce prohibition and now buys pot at one of the more than 2,000 licensed dispensaries across the U.S.
A new study about the power of committed minorities to shift conventional thinking offers some surprising possible answers. Published this week in Science, the paper describes an online experiment in which researchers sought to determine what percentage of total population a minority needs to reach the critical mass necessary to reverse a majority viewpoint. The tipping point, they found, is just 25 percent. At and slightly above that level, contrarians were able to “convert” anywhere from 72 to 100 percent of the population of their respective groups. Prior to the efforts of the minority, the population had been in 100 percent agreement about their original position.
David Hain's insight:

The critical mass for change? should we beware of small extremist groups, or using this insight to build alliances for positive change?

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Success Spotlight: Leader of Change Management at Microsoft

Success Spotlight: Leader of Change Management at Microsoft | Business change | Scoop.it
The people in Microsoft have been doing change management for a long while, but it hasn’t been very public. The original group that drove change management started in 2005 and was known as the Business Strategy Consulting Team. This team of 25 individuals focused on helping customers who had bought large amounts of technology get the best use that they could out of it. They worked directly with customers and CXOs at the executive level, helping customers adopt new ways of working with the technology that they had purchased. It was only around 2009 or 2010 that Microsoft realized that change management could be a competitive advantage as a strategic capability, and that this would require a more comprehensive and scalable change management methodology than what we had been using. Microsoft now has a dedicated team of around 100 people who focus all of their time on Adoption and Change Management, helping customers and partners grow their own capabilities in change management and gain real business value from the products and services that they purchase.
David Hain's insight:

How Microsoft manages change.

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Delivering for citizens: How to triple the success rate of government transformations

Delivering for citizens: How to triple the success rate of government transformations | Business change | Scoop.it

The failure rate of government transformations is far too high. It represents a huge missed opportunity to tackle society’s greatest challenges more effectively, to give citizens better experiences with government, and to make more productive use of limited public resources. If governments around the world matched their most improved counterparts, they could save as much as $3.5 trillion a year by 2021 while maintaining today’s levels of service quality. Alternatively, they could release substantial funds for the services citizens most care about, while keeping overall government expenditure constant.

Of course, this is easier said than done. Government leaders often have limited political capital, particularly in sensitive services such as education and healthcare, and in instances where ministers serve in a minority or coalition government. The public sector often has too many priorities: leaders try to reform too much, across too broad a waterfront. Another challenge is a lack of leadership longevity. For example, a review of ministers of health across 23 countries from 1990 to 2009 found that half of them served for less than two years in office.

To grasp the prize, governments can learn from the 20 percent of transformations that do achieve their goals. Our study not only shows what that involves but also highlights dozens of real-world success stories. It identifies five disciplines that, together, can more than triple the success rate of government transformations (exhibit). These disciplines may seem obvious, but our research shows that they are extremely difficult to get right.

David Hain's insight:

McKinsey report on how governments can up their pretty poor success rate in making transformations work. And boy, do they need to...

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The Power of Listening in Helping People Change

The Power of Listening in Helping People Change | Business change | Scoop.it
One reason that giving feedback (even when it’s positive) often backfires is because it signals that the boss is in charge and the boss is judgmental. This can make employees stressed and defensive, which makes it harder for them to see another person’s perspective. For example, employees can handle negative feedback by downplaying the importance of the person providing the feedback or the feedback itself. People may even reshape their social networks to avoid the feedback source in order to restore their self-esteem. In other words, they defend themselves by bolstering their attitudes against the person giving feedback.

We wanted to explore whether a more subtle intervention, namely asking questions and listening, could prevent these consequences. Whereas feedback is about telling employees that they need to change, listening to employees and asking them questions might make them want to change. In a recent paper, we consistently demonstrated that experiencing high quality (attentive, empathic, and non-judgmental) listening can positively shape speakers’ emotions and attitudes.

David Hain's insight:

Seek first to understand - the power of listening to elicit change readiness.

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How management can prevent the downside of change

How management can prevent the downside of change | Business change | Scoop.it
The researchers, from universities in China and the US, found it is the perceptions of the change coupled with the perceptions of management which increase role stress and have a negative impact on role performance and job satisfaction. Together these two factors often exacerbate an already bad situation.

 

Drive their staff harder

What the researchers also found was that senior management seeking cost efficiencies will inevitably drive their staff harder. This is often as a direct result of the fact that fewer people have to do the same job as a larger team once did.

In many sectors such as healthcare, the passenger airline industry etc. there are definite minimum ratios between staff and clients that cannot be reduced without compromising safety.
David Hain's insight:

Staff perceptions are critical to change receptiveness. this implies a need for continuous dialogue, not simply when change is coming!

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Mapping and Managing Stakeholders: A Practical Guide

Mapping and Managing Stakeholders: A Practical Guide | Business change | Scoop.it
As counterintuitive as this might sound, in corporate context, building a product that customers want is not enough to keep the project going. Managing stakeholders is equally important.
There’s loads of content out there on this topic. And understandably so, for a topic relevant for project managers and product owners in many roles, not just in innovation. A simple Google search of the query ‘managing stakeholders’ returns about 10,600,000 results. By comparison, searching for ‘lean startup’ returns ‘only’ 4,400,000 results.
In The Corporate Startup we present a workshop activity dedicated to stakeholder management. This post wishes to be an addition to that activity, looking at specific actions that you can take when managing stakeholders.
David Hain's insight:

Useful technique from Innov8rs for stakeholder mapping - never done enough at the outset in my experience. Use for diagnostic or planning purposes.

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