Business Case Studies
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Business Case Studies
The case studies available here are narratives that facilitate discussions about a particular business or management issue.
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Transformation of Entire Supply Chain into an Extended Enterprise System - Cisco Case Study

Transformation of Entire Supply Chain into an Extended Enterprise System - Cisco Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Cisco systems 'ecosystem' which in fact transformed the entire supply chain into an extended enterprise system based on internet technology was created in order to links customers, prospects, partners, suppliers and employees in a multi-party, multi-location electronic network.
Abey Francis's insight:
Cisco Systems has developed a scalable business model that enables the company to meet the challenges posed by continued explosive business growth. It has created a new form of supply enterprise,termed an‘ecosystem’,that seamlessly links together customers,employees,contract manufacturers and other supply chain partners into a multi-site,multi-location electronic network,based on the practices and technology of the Internet
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Use of Technology by Zara to Improve Operational Responsiveness

Use of Technology by Zara to Improve Operational Responsiveness | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Fashion giant, Zara, forms part of the retail group ‘Grupo Inditex’ which is one of the “largest, fastest growing and successful” clothing retailers across Europe. Grupo Inditex is formulated by an amalgamation of major high street names from across Europe, including Zara, Pull and Bear and Bershka, in total boasting 3825 stores across 68 countries. …
Abey Francis's insight:
Zara's use of technology in information & technology is unique from its competitors. Firstly Zara uses much less technology, in terms of expenditure and work-force, than its competitors - just 0.5% of its work force compared to 2.5% of employees that its rivals utilise. Similarly Zara spends only 0.5% of its revenue on information technology compared to expenditure of 2% by its competitors. Secondly Zara employs a unique combination of human and IT intelligence. Managers at the stores and the market survey done by the employees, form the human intelligence while IT intelligence consists of the PDA devices used to send information collected by the managers and other employees carrying the PDAs. An order form is transmitted to each manager's PDA asking for information such as availability of garments and patterns of garment sales. The managers of each retail outlets then divide this order form into sections and these sections are transmitted to the PDAs of each employee to fill up, based on customers' feedback and the kind of designs sold. Employees then transmit back their respective sections to the manager's PDA, after entering the customer's requirements. The managers of each store are given total authority to determine and identify which sections are to be retained in the order form. The edited order form is then sent back to headquarters where the designing teams start working on the basis of the order forms. This unique hybrid of humans & technology helps in managing the inventories efficiently and quick and efficient link between demand and supply, thus successfully helping in their own doctrine of 'fast fashion'.
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Building a Global Brand Image- Nike Case Study

Building a Global Brand Image- Nike Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Brand History The idea of Nike began way back in the 1950s. A track coach by the name of Bill Bowerman was at the University of Oregon training his team. Bill was always looking for a competitive edge for his runners, like most of us today look for any advantage we can get. Bill said …
Abey Francis's insight:
In Greek Mythology, the word “Nike” is associated to the goddess of success, representing ‘honored conquest’ on the battleground. When Bill Bowerman and Phile Knight founded Nike, they aspired to inspire this myth in every product. Primarily, Nike focused on top quality sports shoes however branches quickly to all kinds of sportswear. Their objective was not just to aid the world’s finest sportsmen find new degree of accomplishment, but to morph the normal person into a new place o Nike athleticism. The founder wanted each client to believe that through purchasing Nike products, they would obtain success, power and happiness. Nike stores are consistent with this dream. As a money making business, the branding strategy of Nike interpolate its client into buying merchandise. 

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Starbucks Entry to China Case Study

Starbucks Entry to China Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Starbucks is one of the largest coffee chains in the World. The company has a unique style and atmosphere in their coffee houses. We chose China because it is the world’s most populous country with over 1.3 billion people live there and second-largest country by land area. After 1978, the country’s economy were underwent dramatic …
Abey Francis's insight:
Starbucks, one of the largest coffee chains in the world, was started in 1971 in Seattle, USA. It is regarded as the pioneer of the coffee culture in the US and in many other countries. Earlier, Starbucks dealt only in coffee beans and equipment. It was only in the 1980s, with Howard Schultz taking charge as the marketing chief and later as CEO that the company ventured into building coffee houses. In 1995, the company started its international expansion by entering Japan, followed by many other countries in the later years. It entered China around the mid-1990s with a distribution business, before making a full-fledged entry with its retail stores in 1998. The case study particularly talks about Starbucks' entry into China. It highlights the strategies of entry and expansion and also discusses some of the localization strategies followed by Starbucks in the country.
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Integrated Customer Ordering Service at Marks & Spencer

Integrated Customer Ordering Service at Marks & Spencer | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Marks and Spencer is one of the leading retail organizations in UK which sell stylish, quality and great value clothing and home products , also quality food. They are one of the most popular brand among people not only in UK but globally. They have more than 600 stores in UK and constantly increasing many …
Abey Francis's insight:
In this coursework, I have tried to discuss how Information Systems play an important role in the functioning of an organisation. An adequate Information System is a must requirement in today's technology-driven and competitive era. I studied about a system integrated in Marks and Spencer for improving its ordering system and thereby proving to be a reason for its return on investment. The Information system helps to control, coordinate, analyze, interrelate data and also supports in decision making. I have explained how application of an Information System can support organizational success and efficiency by increasing profits and providing services that are easily accessible to meet the needs of organisation in such a way that the organisation can keep up the standards and services smoothly.
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Case Study of Zara : Application of Business Intelligence in Retail Industry

Case Study of Zara : Application of Business Intelligence in Retail Industry | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
The Zara has made of use of Information Systems (IS) and to advance in many areas. This has resulted in huge success for the company. 
Abey Francis's insight:
Information Systems deals with the application of people, technologies and procedures to solve business problems. Management information systems are different from the normal is in the sense that they are applied in analyzing other is used in operational activities of the organization. In academics, the term usually refers to a group information management methods associated with the automation and decision making of humans for example, expert systems, decision support system , executive information systems. In management information system data is carefully and systematically collected, stored and disseminated in the form of information required to perform roles of management.
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Nissan's Successful Turnaround Under the Leadership of Carlos Ghosn

Nissan's Successful Turnaround Under the Leadership of Carlos Ghosn | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
The presented case study is about a challenging turnaround of the Japanese car manufacturing company Nissan under the leadership of Carlos Ghosn.
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Nissan has been successfully competing in the automobile industry through decades, but in the early nineties they reached a critical point with severe losses and debt. The Nissan brand was loosing its value, and a turnover was urgent for the company to survive. Nissan got an alliance opportunity with Renault, which resulted in Carlos Ghosn taking over, as the first non-Japanese Chief Operating Officer in Nissans history. The task at hand for Ghosn was not easy, but he came to Japan with a vital revival plan hoping to succeed. When Carlos Ghosn took over Nissan in 1999, the company was on the brink of disaster, with a staggering $22 billion debt, slumping sales, a declining image, etc. Just one year later, the automaker was profitable once again. By 2001, debt had been whittled down to $4 billion, operating profit was at a record high, and the popularity of the brands new models surpassed all expectations.

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“Imagination At Work” Ad Campaign by General Electric

“Imagination At Work” Ad Campaign by General Electric | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
General Electrics “Imagination At Work” ad campaign made a change in consumers’ perceptions of GE: more people were viewing GE as a high-tech company rather than as a relic from the smokestack eras.
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Since 1979 General Electric Co. (GE) had relied on one of the most successful branding slogans in history: ‘‘We bring good things to life.’’ But along the way the company had become almost exclusively associated with its lighting and appliance products, which by the end of the twentieth century represented only a small percentage of the company’s business. With the installation of a new chief executive, Jeffrey R. Immelt, who replaced the legendary Jack Welch, the company decided to rethink its branding in order to better position GE as an innovative and forward-looking company. The result was a new slogan, ‘‘Imagination at work,’’ which became the focus of a campaign aimed at consumers, business partners, and investors as well as GE employees. The $100 million ‘‘Imagination at Work’’ campaign, developed by BBDO Worldwide Inc., began in January 2003. In addition to TV spots, it included print ads and Web elements. The advertisements simultaneously repositioned the brand and directly promoted one of GE’s many businesses. In one commercial, for example, Lassie, the heroic canine star of vintage TV and films, warded off a cougar with an array of karate moves as a way to talk about GE’s security technology. In time the campaign also spread to Europe and Asia. Despite taking some criticism for dropping ‘‘We bring good things to life,’’ GE expressed satisfaction with the campaign and continued to build on it. Market research detected a change in consumers’ perceptions of GE: more people were viewing GE as a high-tech company rather than as a relic from the smokestack era. Moreover the new slogan became something of a rallying cry within the company, spurring on employees to make innovative contributions.

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Social Anxiety Disorder Campaign by SmithKline Beecham

Social Anxiety Disorder Campaign by SmithKline Beecham | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
After the social anxiety disorder campaign had been running for seven months, according to Medical Marketing and Media, Paxil scored third among advertised prescription drugs in unaided recall, behind Viagra and Claritin.
Abey Francis's insight:

In 1999 Paxil, manufactured by SmithKline Beecham (now GlaxoSmithKline plc), was third among the pharmaceutical industry’s best-selling SSRIs, a class of drugs then used primarily to treat depression and anxiety related maladies. The drugmaker’s strategy for gaining ground on rivals Prozac and Zoloft included extending Paxil’s market by winning approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat other forms of mental illness. When, in May of that year, the FDA made Paxil its only approved treatment for social anxiety disorder, the drug finally found itself in a position, after seven years on the market, to outsell its rivals. Social anxiety disorder was a little-known condition at the time, but estimates by SmithKline Beecham put the number of potential Paxil customers in the United States at close to 10 million. Enlisting the public relations firm Cohn & Wolfe as well as Paxil’s advertising agency of record, McCann Erickson Consumer Health, SmithKline Beecham mounted a combined physician, PR, and directto-consumer branded campaign that was meant to inform Americans about social anxiety disorder and to let them know that Paxil alone had been approved to treat it.

 

Immediately after learning of the FDA ruling, SmithKline Beecham increased its spending on physician-targeted ads to get the word out about the new Paxil designation. Meanwhile, the drugmaker funded a public-service campaign meant to spread awareness of social anxiety disorder. Then, in September 1999, a $30 million push of the Paxil brand began its run on television and in magazines with national circulations. SmithKline Beecham focused its message about social anxiety disorder on professionals between the ages of 18 and 34, with an emphasis on men, who were believed more likely to seek help for the condition because of career concerns.

 

The PR campaign resulted in more than a billion media references to social anxiety disorder, up from roughly 50 in previous years, almost all of which mentioned that Paxil was the only approved treatment for the condition. Seven months after its launch, the campaign had made the Paxil brand name one of the most recognized prescription drugs in the United States, and the drug was responsible for a sizeable increase in the anxiety medication category. Paxil gained on its SSRI rivals and experienced sustained sales growth, a trend that continued as the drug won further treatment designations, and the company adapted its marketing accordingly in the following years.

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GoDaddy's Super Bowl Commercials Case Study

GoDaddy's Super Bowl Commercials Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
In 2005 GoDaddy.com successfully exercised an advertising campaign during the Super Bowl, the most viewed television event in the US.
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By 2004 Go Daddy Software had become a leader in the Internet domain-name registration industry, buying available domain names and then selling them to individuals and businesses for a yearly fee. In 2004 the company embarked on its first national marketing effort, contracting New York agency the Ad Store to help make Go Daddy and the GoDaddy.com website known to mainstream America via a TV spot for Super Bowl XXXIX. That Super Bowl, played on February 6, 2005, was the first since the infamous ‘‘wardrobe malfunction’’ that had resulted in pop singer Janet Jackson’s breast being exposed on the air during the previous year’s halftime show. Among the results of the public outcry following the incident was increased pressure on Super Bowl advertisers to avoid risque´ images and themes. Go Daddy chose to fly in the face of this pressure by running a sexually suggestive commercial that lampooned the prevailing climate of censorship.

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Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty Case Study

Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
In a world that is inundated with images that give women a narrow view of what the ideal body, the Dove's Campaign for Real Beauty is a refreshing change.
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 For decades, the media has portrayed the idea of a “beautiful woman” as something completely fake. Whether it’s in a magazine or on a commercial, almost every single one of these women have been photo-shopped or modified to some extent; some a lot more extreme than others. One brand in particular decided to take a stand and do something different, to stand out. That brand is Dove.

The aim of the Dove Campaign for Real Beauty is to celebrate the natural physical differences personified by all women and to encourage them to have the confidence to be comfortable and happy with themselves. This campaign has won a handful (or two) of ad awards and has sold an enormous amount of product. Sales have increased to $4 billion today from $2.5 billion in its opening campaign year.

Not only has this campaign helped Dove successfully increase its sales (and number of awards), but it has also increased women’s confidence. Research from a Harvard psychologist, Nancy Etcoff, examining the campaign and found that more women today describe beauty on a wider variety of qualities outside of just looks, such as confidence.

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Intel Corporation's Social Media Strategy

Intel Corporation's Social Media Strategy | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Intel is everywhere in the digital social media - blogs, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Google+, LinkedIn, etc. Intel’s chosen social media weapon is high-quality content, and its delivery vehicle is its staff.
Abey Francis's insight:

With 17,000,000 likes on its global Facebook page, 900,000 @Intel Twitter followers, and more than 44,000 subscribers to YouTube, Intel’s Social Media Center of Excellence is certainly living up to its name. In addition to the global accounts, Intel’s geo and country teams operate an additional 50+ international Facebook pages, 30+ supporting Twitter handles, and 14+ global YouTube channels.

 

Organizations such as Intel are beginning to look and operate more like media companies–a transition that doesn’t happen overnight. They’re evaluating topics and trends in real-time and creating a brand narrative across multiple networks. It takes a lot of content to fuel that many channels–and a dedicated team to manage the ideation, creation, and analysis of that content. More importantly, it takes a lot of quality content to generate engagement with audiences across continents and timezones, and for Intel engagement is a key metric.

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Starbucks Social Media Marketing Strategy

Starbucks Social Media Marketing Strategy | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Starbucks social media marketing strategy consists of many different elements masterfully integrated and combined, involving millions of loyal fans boosting their branding.
Abey Francis's insight:

Starbuck's has a big brand presence online. Not because they have millions of dollars for Marketing and Advertising, which they do have, but because they are one of the most engaging companies online. If you are fan of Starbucks coffee, and a bit Internet savvy, then chances are you have come across one of if not all of Starbuck’s Social Media Pages. Starbucks has made it a point to take its successful offline branding strategies and implement them online. Its online image and messages have stayed consistent with their brand values, which are honesty, sincerity, and connecting with its consumers on a level unlike any other brand. The offline Starbucks Culture has taken to the airwaves of the Internet and Social Media. Lets take a look at how they became one of the most engaging brands online.

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Using Marketing Channels to Create Value for Customers - Fedex Case Study

Using Marketing Channels to Create Value for Customers - Fedex Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
FedEx as a service company that mainly focuses on transportation or shipment services, channel played an important role leading to success. FedEx has a strong network structure linking all the market together. FedEx serves more than 220 countries and territories currently.
Abey Francis's insight:
By and large, a channel designed to do the service available to clients. A service without good selling channel consider useless because it is non accessible for client to acquire the service. FedEx as a service company that chiefly focuses on transit or cargo services, channel played an of import function taking to success. FedEx need a good channel to acquire and make more clients. FedEx has a strong web construction associating all the market together. FedEx serves more than 220 states and districts presently. Further, these webs are linked up by land, air and ocean transit. FedEx ‘s service covered all around the Earth, doing services available for clients from many states and about every topographic point. FedEx has many beads off location around the Earth. Customer can take either one drop- off location that is nearest to them.
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Zara's Supply Chain Success Case Study

Zara's Supply Chain Success Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Zara is a Spanish fashion clothing manufacturer and retailer, formed in the 1970’s It is known that only two weeks are required for Zara to complete the development and shipment of a new product to its stores, which outweighs the average of fashion industry of six months, thanks to the collaborative relationship with customers and …
Abey Francis's insight:
Zara can deliver garments to stores worldwide in just a few days: China – 48 hrs; Europe – 24 hrs; Japan – 72 hrs; United States – 48 hrs. It uses trucks to deliver to stores in Europe and uses air freight to ship clothes to other markets. Zara can afford this increased shipping cost because it does not need to do much discounting of clothes and it also does not spend much money on advertising.

Zara is a clothing and fashion retailer that uses its supply chain to significantly change the way it operates in a very traditional industry. No other competitor can copy its business model until it first copies its supply chain. And since supply chains are composed of people, process, and technology, even the latest and greatest technology is not a competitive advantage all by itself. People must be well trained, and processes must be put in place that enable people to apply their training and their technology to best effect.
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Zara Business Model Case Study

Zara Business Model Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Zara's business model is basically based on the principle that it can sell "medium quality fashion clothing at affordable prices".
Abey Francis's insight:
The key to the process lies in Zara’s skill at tuning into the personal tastes of its customers so that it can give them what they want even before they ask for it. To do that, more than 200 designers located at the company’s central headquarters in Spain constantly collect information about the decisions made by consumers in each of the chain’s stores. They also probe the latest trends, which their own scouts observe in the streets and malls around the world, for inspiration when they are designing their latest creations. In reality, Zara is all about timing. Its products wind up on the shelves and clothing racks of its shops because Zara produces them by itself and only continues to manufacture those products that sell the best within its stores. Another one of Zara’s business-model strengths is that it has limited production seasons and a high turnover of products; they change every 15 days.

Nowadays, it seems that none of its main competitors – the manufacturers of so-called ‘fast fashion’ items that are quickly designed and sold mainstream from the latest high-fashion trends — including Sweden’s H&M, Spain’s Mango and America’s The Gap – have a more flexible and efficient model than Zara when it comes to offering the latest in fashion, at the lowest possible price, and in the shortest possible time. How long will that last? The crowded world of retail can be fickle. Zara will no doubt continue to assess its business model and, if needed, adjust it to meet the changing needs of its customers.
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Corporate Social Responsibility of Starbucks Case Study

Corporate Social Responsibility of Starbucks Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Starbucks is the world’s largest and most popular coffee company. Since the beginning, this premier café aimed to deliver the world’s finest fresh-roasted coffee. Today the company dominates the industry and has created a brand that is tantamount with loyalty, integrity and proven longevity. Starbucks is not just a name, but a culture. It is …
Abey Francis's insight:
First and foremost, Starbucks decided to invest in its people and the communities they work with. When a company puts people first, and focuses on making positive changes for the communities they work with and serve, consumers notice. In fact, studies show that when companies support social or environmental issues, 93% of consumers have a more positive image of that company. Starbucks’ strategy and resultant outcomes are proof positive of that study. Plus, when companies like invest in their people, they see less turnover, and employees become advocates of the company as well.
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Case Study: Merger Between US Airways and American Airlines

Case Study: Merger Between US Airways and American Airlines | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
On December 9th, 2013 the two airlines, US Airways and American Airlines merged to form the American Airline Group that turn out to be the major airline in the world. This merger was structured by the enlarged competition that airlines are countenancing in the business at present. The merger offered a prospect for both airlines …
Abey Francis's insight:
Few would counter the conclusion that, so far, the merger between American Airlines and US Airways has been nearly flawless. In late 2015 the company executed the most successful passenger systems cutover in the recent history of US consolidation. With a unified customer interface, American is now in a position to start exploiting some revenue synergies inherent in the merger. In parallel with meticulously planning the complex technology transition to a single system, American has worked since the close of its merger three years ago to slash nearly USD3.6 billion in debt. Between 2014 and Sep-2015 the company paid USD350 million in dividends, and repurchased nearly USD4.5 billion in stock. Its top line profits for the first nine months of 2015 jumped 89% to USD4.3 billion. But American’s stock in 2015 traded at a discount for much of the year, as investors became spooked over the company’s efforts to match fares of ultra low cost competitors.
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Case Study: Success Story of Google Search Engine

Case Study: Success Story of Google Search Engine | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
The persistence of Google for continuous excellence and innovation makes them the leading standard. Google has helped to redefine the value of how the individuals, businesses and technologist see the Internet.
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Google, Inc. made innovation an everyday process rather than using it as a strategy during times of crisis. While some companies worked on perfecting their product before its initial release, Google followed a unique ‘launch and iterate’ process to innovation. Right from the time the company was founded, Google relied on its employees to augment its culture of innovation.
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Claire Bear's curator insight, May 16, 2017 5:14 AM
I am going to store this away for later. Most students today could not imagine a world without Google.  It is a relevant case study worth showing a Business or commerce class.  
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Analysis of "Do More" Advertising Campaign by American Express

Analysis of "Do More" Advertising Campaign by American Express | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Created by ad agency Ogilvy & Mather, ‘‘Do More’’ aimed to convey all the advantages AmEx could offer, ranging from its numerous charge and credit cards to travel services and financial-planning assistance.
Abey Francis's insight:

The American Express Company (AmEx) was long associated with the celebrities whose appearance in print campaigns was meant to position ‘‘membership’’ in its credit-card brand as the domain of a privileged few. But AmEx’s elitist brand image became a serious hindrance in the 1980s and 1990s. Rivals such as Visa U.S.A. and MasterCard International had been using their own marketing to exploit the fact that their card brands were accepted more universally than AmEx, and by 1996 their gains had significantly eroded AmEx’s market share. The launch of a new umbrella advertising campaign tagged ‘‘Do More’’ was not just the debut of new creative concepts; it marked a concerted attempt to reposition the AmEx brand.
Created by ad agency Ogilvy & Mather, ‘‘Do More’’ aimed to convey all the advantages AmEx could offer, ranging from its numerous charge and credit cards to travel services and financial-planning assistance. The company also used ‘‘Do More’’ to broaden its consumer base, employing celebrities, such as Tiger Woods and Jerry Seinfeld, who appealed to consumers across demographic and income boundaries. The umbrella effort had various incarnations and encompassed several individual campaigns through 2001. AmEx typically spent between $170 million and $200 million on U.S. credit-card advertising during these years.
AmEx gained market share in the first two years that ‘‘Do More’’ ran. Difficulties in later years were reversed by the introduction of a new card appealing to young adults, a product whose existence itself was a measure of the evolving nature of the AmEx brand. ‘‘Do More’’ did a great deal to bring about and to publicize this evolution, and many of the hallmarks of this repositioning campaign—including the continued participation of Tiger Woods and Jerry Seinfeld—were visible in the advertising that followed its discontinuation in 2002.

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The Collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008

The Collapse of Lehman Brothers in 2008 | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
In September 2008, Lehman Brothers filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The company became insolvent with finances totalling $639 billion in assets and debt worth $619 billion; it became the largest bankruptcy in history.
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The aim of this case study is to discuss the case of fall of Lehman Brothers which enjoyed several years of the glorious past and reach to a financial tragedy leading to its collapse in 2008. The crucial part of the question that “Why did Lehman Brothers fall?” 


The bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers had brought a devastating effect for economies and the financial markets worldwide. The fall of Lehman Brothers was not just a banking failure but it was far more and had its effect in the worldwide economy. This was a human failure that leads to the greatest tragedy in the field of investment and real estate market and lead to a severe financial crisis and global recession.

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Citibank's "Live Richly" Ad Campaign Case Study

Citibank's "Live Richly" Ad Campaign Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Citibank committed itself to the ‘‘Live Richly’’ campaign through Fallon in 2001 by bolstering its advertising budget, increasing it to some $100 million.
Abey Francis's insight:

Citibank, a subsidiary of Citigroup Inc., the largest financial-services company in the world, offered consumer and corporate banking services through some 1,400 offices in more than 40 countries. In the early twenty-first century, amid a strong U.S. economy, Citibank initiated research for an advertising campaign to promote its personalized services, attract financially savvy consumers seeking options for investing their new wealth, and strengthen brand recognition. With the help of newly hired advertising agency Fallon Worldwide of Minneapolis, Citibank launched the ‘‘Live Richly’’ advertising campaign in 2001.


The rebranding campaign, with an estimated budget of $100 million, was built around the tagline ‘‘Live Richly.’’ The television, print, and billboard campaign featured slogans such as ‘‘People with fat wallets are not necessarily more jolly,’’ ‘‘Holding shares shouldn’t be your only form of affection,’’ and ‘‘He who dies with the most toys is still dead,’’ emphasizing the importance of living life to the fullest while downplaying the focus on money. In addition to promoting the Citibank brand, the campaign sought to highlight Citibank’s credit-card division as well as its retail bank operations. Several of the ‘‘Live Richly’’ television commercials were named ‘‘Best Spots’’ by Adweek magazine. ‘‘Live Richly’’ succeeded in raising interest in Citibank and its offerings: following the unveiling of ads for Citibank’s new financial service Citipro, the number of information requests for Citipro at retail branches increased 47 percent.

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BMW Film's "The Hire" Ad Camapaign Case Study

BMW Film's "The Hire" Ad Camapaign Case Study | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
In a series of short online films known as “The Hire,” starring Clive Owen as the heroic, enigmatic “Driver,” BMW sought to promote its brand in an unorthodox way.
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In 2000 Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW) posted total sales of $33 billion, a slight decrease from its 1999 earnings of $34 billion. Afraid of further backsliding, the Bavarian automaker decided to reshape its advertising to better target the Internet-savvy BMW customer. Before 2001 the company’s advertisements had typically consisted of product-driven campaigns with immaculate BMWs clinging to mountain roads. BMW asked its longtime advertising partner, Fallon Worldwide, to create something different. In 2001 five action-packed short films emerged under the campaign title ‘‘The Hire,’’ which became one of the most acclaimed campaigns in advertising history.

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Delta Airlines Successful Business Turnaround

Delta Airlines Successful Business Turnaround | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
The case study discusses the reasons of financial problems and restructuring plan of Delta Airlines. Issues like the pilot union impasse, increasing operational expenses and legacy costs, falling yields and severe competition from low cost airlines are discussed in detail.
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What started as a humble, little aerial crop dusting operation called Huff Daland Dusters in 1924 has now grown into one of the world’s largest global airlines, helping more than 160 million travelers get to the places they want to go to each year. Delta Air Lines was the third biggest airlines in the US in the early 2000s. After the September 11 attacks, which led to the decline of the airline industry in the US, many of the major carriers in the industry went bankrupt. Delta was one of the few major carriers that managed to stay afloat. However, in mid 2004, the airline announced that it might have to file for bankruptcy protection if it failed to obtain pay cuts of $1 billion from its pilots, who were the only unionized employees at the airline. The case discusses the problems at Delta and their role in the financial decline of the airline. Issues like the pilot union impasse, increasing operational expenses and legacy costs, falling yields and severe competition from low cost airlines are discussed in detail.

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Richard Stern's curator insight, February 20, 2015 9:08 AM

Interesting information about Delta. GTI Travel is a preferred vendor of Delta.

Thomas Bivens's curator insight, September 11, 2015 11:49 AM

With the September 11th attacks on the United States, the airline industry suffered and Delta was no different. Many U.S. airlines filed for bankruptcy and Delta was well on its way to doing the same. The reconstruction plan called for the removal of 7,000 employees which is around 10% of the company's work force. In addition, one of the airline's biggest hubs, Dallas, cut 90% of its flights which led to the ultimate removal of Dallas as a hub all together. These plans improved the situation but led to a chapter 11 bankruptcy that was filed in 2005. Over time, things changed and the airline industry improved bringing Delta back into the game. This change led Delta Airlines to be one of the most successful and profitable airlines in the world.

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The Body Shop's Ruby Ad Campaign - An Example of Anti-Marketing Strategy

The Body Shop's Ruby Ad Campaign - An Example of Anti-Marketing Strategy | Business Case Studies | Scoop.it
Body Shop created the Ruby ad campaign which challenged the belief that beauty is directly related to size. Ruby, the size 16 campaign doll, challenged the stereotypes of the ideal woman for she looked like a Barbie doll of an average women.
Abey Francis's insight:

The Body Shop was and still is aware of the self- image debacle that women are constantly battling. After all, “to promote self-esteem”is one of their key values as a company. In 1997, they created the Ruby campaign which challenged the belief that beauty is directly related to size. Ruby, the size 16 campaign doll, challenged the stereotypes of the ideal woman for she looked like a Barbie doll of an average women.

 

With the slogan “There are 3 billion women who don’t look like supermodels and only 8 who do” The Body Shop was able to connect to their consumers on a more intimate level for it allowed the customers to see that although this company is part of the cosmetics industry their definition and idea of beauty is not in agreement with the usual message that the industry displays.

 

“Ruby is the fruit of our long-established practice of challenging the way the cosmetic industry talks to women. The Ruby campaign is designed to promote the idea that The Body Shop creates products designed to enhance features, moisturize, cleanse, and polish, not to correct ‘flaws.’ The Body Shop philosophy is that there is real beauty in everyone. We are not claiming that our products perform miracles.’”-Randy Williamson, spokesperson for the Body Shop

 

This campaign was an eye-opener to the public for the Body Shop was one of the first companies to challenge image with Ruby. With all campaigns some can admire it while others disapprove as seen with Mattel, a toy company, who argued that Ruby created a bad image for Barbie and provided The Body Shop with a cease-and-desist order.

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