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Rescooped by Dané Davis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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This Inspiring TED Talk Celebrates Imperfection as the Key to Success

This Inspiring TED Talk Celebrates Imperfection as the Key to Success | Business | Scoop.it

True innovation starts with ditching the ideal of perfection.

 

Studies have shown that self-doubt can potentially be a major hurdle to women's success. There's evidence we might not ask for a promotion, apply for a job we're absolutely qualified for or execute on a big idea because we're not as confident in our abilities as men.

 


Via The Learning Factor
Dané Davis's insight:

Are we still teaching our girls growing up to avoid risk and failure, while their counterparts are taught to play rough, swing high, and crawl to the top of the monkey bars just to jump off head first?  Are we perpetuating habits that stiffen women in their future success? 

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june holley's curator insight, March 14, 2016 12:14 PM

Most girls are taught to avoid risk and failure. We're taught to smile pretty, play it safe, get all A's. Boys, on the other hand, are taught to play rough, swing high, crawl to the top of the monkey bars and then just jump off head first.

Melissa Ness's curator insight, March 15, 2016 1:12 PM

Most girls are taught to avoid risk and failure. We're taught to smile pretty, play it safe, get all A's. Boys, on the other hand, are taught to play rough, swing high, crawl to the top of the monkey bars and then just jump off head first.

Donna Farren's curator insight, March 29, 2016 7:15 PM

Most girls are taught to avoid risk and failure. We're taught to smile pretty, play it safe, get all A's. Boys, on the other hand, are taught to play rough, swing high, crawl to the top of the monkey bars and then just jump off head first.

Rescooped by Dané Davis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Role models are the new royalty, so be a great one

Role models are the new royalty, so be a great one | Business | Scoop.it

In the age of social media, role models are the new royalty. Whether it's labels such as #fitspiration, #bodyspiration or - the hashtag I most frequently see on my newsfeed - #careerspiration, it seems like everyone is looking for someone to look up to. With power, though, comes great responsibility.

As a CEO in a high-profile publishing role, I am in the lucky position to frequently meet people who say my work, books or conference addresses have inspired, motivated and guided them. I love hearing this, but it always leaves me with a slight sense of 'imposter syndrome'. Because, lets face it, I'm only human, and no single person has all the answers. What if I lead someone down the wrong path, and offer advice that doesn't serve them?


Via The Learning Factor
Dané Davis's insight:

In the age of social media we're all looking for someone to look up to.  Who are your inspirations?

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 3, 2016 10:24 PM

In the age of social media we're all looking for someone to look up to.

Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 4, 2016 8:09 AM

In the age of social media we're all looking for someone to look up to.

Rescooped by Dané Davis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Best Leaders Allow Themselves to Be Persuaded

The Best Leaders Allow Themselves to Be Persuaded | Business | Scoop.it

When we think of great leaders, certain characteristics come to mind: They have confidence in their abilities and conviction in their beliefs. They “trust their gut,” “stay the course,” and “prove others wrong.” They aren’t “pushovers,” and they certainly don’t “flip-flop.” But this archetype is terribly outdated. Having spent three years studying many of the world’s most successful leaders for my new book, Persuadable, I’ve learned one surprising thing they have in common: a willingness to be persuaded.

Alan Mulally, the vaunted CEO who saved Ford Motor Company, is, for example, exceptionally skeptical of his own opinions. Ray Dalio, one of the world’s most successful hedge fund managers, insists that his team ruthlessly second-guess his thinking. Christine Lagarde, managing director of the IMF, seeks out information that might disprove her beliefs about the world and herself. In our increasingly complex world, these leaders have realized that the ability to consider emerging evidence and change their minds accordingly provides extraordinary advantages.


Via The Learning Factor
Dané Davis's insight:

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

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Jordan's curator insight, March 8, 2016 6:09 AM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, March 8, 2016 4:05 PM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!

MindShare HR's curator insight, March 10, 2016 7:24 AM

The best Leaders allow themselves to be persuaded, especially for the big decisions!