Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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Solar Roadways

Solar Roadways | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Solar panels that you can drive, park, and walk on. They melt snow and... cut greenhouse gases by 75-percent?!!!
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:

Solar Roadways is a modular paving system of solar panels that can withstand the heaviest of trucks (250,000 pounds). These Solar Road Panels can be installed on roads, parking lots, driveways, sidewalks, bike paths, playgrounds... literally any surface under the sun. They pay for themselves primarily through the generation of electricity, which can power homes and businesses connected via driveways and parking lots. A nationwide system could produce more clean renewable energy than a country uses as a whole


(http://solarroadways.com/numbers.shtml). They have many other features as well, including: heating elements to stay snow/ice free, LEDs to make road lines and signage, and attached Cable Corridor to store and treat stormwater and provide a "home" for power and data cables. EVs will be able to charge with energy from the sun (instead of fossil fuels) from parking lots and driveways and after a roadway system is in place, mutual induction technology will allow for charging while driving. 

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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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2017 EL 50 Industry Honorees

2017 EL 50 Industry Honorees | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Beau Daane, Weatherhead School of Management grad and
Director, Sustainable Development
Fairmount Santrol is named one of the top Environmental Leaders for 2018

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Congratulations to Beau Daane, one of our MBA grads now leading the way as Director of Sustainability at Fairmount Santrol. We just found out that Beau has once again made our Weatherhead School of Management proud--he has been named one of the top 75 environmental leaders in corporate sustainability. Beau has also had great mentors at the "Fairmount family"--Jennifer Deckard, CEO and former CEO Chuck Fowler--both were also Weatherhead EMBA grads.  From all of us at the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit we are sending you and your "family" big cheers! 
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Millennial Survey 2018 | Deloitte | Social impact, Innovation

Millennial Survey 2018 | Deloitte | Social impact, Innovation | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Following a troubling year, where geopolitical and social concerns gave rise to a new wave of business activism, millennials and Gen Z are sounding the alarm, according to Deloitte’s seventh annual Millennial Survey. Millennials’ opinions about business’ motivations and ethics, which had trended up the past two years, retreated dramatically this year, as did their sense of loyalty.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Deloitte’s 2018 Millennial Survey is eye opening—at least for me as a business school professor. Each new generation brings its own set of attitudes, beliefs and behaviors. Millennials’ confidence in business, loyalty to employers are rapidly deteriorating. The key finding based on a survey of 10,000 millennials across 36 countries is this: 

 Respondents yearn for leaders whose decisions might benefit the world—and their careers 

 This year’s survey shows a clear, negative shift in millennials’ feelings about business’ motivations and ethics. Today, the majority of millennials do not believe that businesses behave ethically and do not believe that business leaders are committed to helping improve society. In terms of change—kind of a sea change in one year-- only a minority of millennials believe businesses behave ethically (48 percent vs 65 percent in 2017) and that business leaders are committed to helping improve society (47 percent vs 62 percent in 2017). 

 There continues to be a stark mismatch between what millennials believe responsible businesses should achieve and what they perceive businesses’ actual priorities to be—but where matches exist, those companies are more successful, have more stimulating work environments and do a better job of developing talent. 

 Their concerns suggest this is an ideal time for business leaders to prove themselves as agents of positive change. 

The findings are based on the views of more than 10,000 millennials questioned across 36 countries and more than 1,800 Gen Z respondents questioned in six countries. The survey was conducted 24 November 2017 through 15 January 2018. Here are three other notable findings from the massive survery: 

 1. Forty-three percent of millennials envision leaving their jobs within two years; only 28 percent seek to stay beyond five years. The 15-point gap is up from seven points last year. Employed Gen Z respondents express even less loyalty, with 61 percent saying they would leave within two years if given the choice. 

 2. Millennials and Gen Z recognize the current and future importance of Industry 4.0, yet many feel unprepared for the changes it will bring. Fewer than four in 10 millennials (36 percent) and three in 10 Gen Z currently in work (29 percent) believe they have the skills and knowledge they’ll need to thrive. 

 3. While technical skills are always necessary, respondents are especially interested in building interpersonal skills, confidence and ethical behavior—all of which they consider essential for a business to be successful. They would like business to take a lead role in readying people for Industry 4.0.
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The Theory of the Business

The Theory of the Business | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Not in a very long time—not, perhaps, since the late 1940s or early 1950s—have there been as many new major management techniques as there are today: downsizing, out-sourcing, total quality management, economic value analysis, benchmarking, reengineering. Each is a powerful tool. But, with the exceptions of outsourcing and reengineering, these tools are designed primarily to […]
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
In this classic HBR article Peter Drucker speaks to "the theory of business"--what it is; why important; and how the theory of business changes. In today's context, for example, there are some spectacular examples of the positive change in today's theory of business (see our previous posting on Walmart's commitment to help the world reduce carbon emissions at a level that's somewhere akin to reducing to zero all the emissions from Germany and Japan) and there are some remarkably disastrous (for the business and the world) examples where the theory of business is totally out of sync with reality--for example Volkswagen's diesel scandal costing the company some $30 billion in penalties as well as reputation damage that may far exceed that.  In one case the "theory of business"-- of business as an agent of world benefit can be seen to be emerging, while in the second case its reality was no where to be found. I think if Drucker were still with us he would be observing and building the new theory of business. It would include all of the things we are hearing about conscious capitalism , the B-corp, shared value as a strategy concept, the stakeholder view of the firm, the Purpose Economy, and more. But what would that something more be? I think it would include "a theory of work"--and how opportunity for dignified work is something of gift we too often take for granted--and i think it would include a theory of organic interdependence, that is, how all of life is connected like each distinct but inseparable organ in the body. And i think it would include a view of innovation and entrepreneurship--where to find the opportunities-- and how the greatest sources of innovation might be found in the world's 17 great global goals, representing trillions in business opportunities to build a better world. Would it not be great to see a history of human well-being--how the world may be getting better and better-- alongside of the changing "theory of business?"    
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Next generation takes over at Akron's GOJO Industries

Next generation takes over at Akron's GOJO Industries | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Marcella Kanfer Rolnick--a leader in the concept of business as a force for good-- is taking the reins of Akron-based GOJO Industries Inc., the company announced Wednesday, May 9.

Kanfer Rolnick, vice chair since 2007 and a third generation of the Lippman-Kanfer family, is now the executive chair for the 72-year-old family company, maker of Purell-brand hand sanitizer.

David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Cheers to Marcella Kanfer Rolnick--she is now the executive chair of GOJO Industries--one of the region's great leaders in "doing good, doing well" and advancing the idea of full spectrum flourishing--working toward a world where business can excel, people can flourish, and nature can thrive. Marcella has been a long term member of the Advisory Board for the Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit and is an inspiration for uniting high performance business acumen with the practice of high purpose business. Upon taking the reins of this 72 year old family company Marcella stated:  "I am humbled and proud to serve and lead with our talented team in pursuit of our GOJO Purpose – Saving Lives and Making Life Better Through Well-Being Solutions."  

Marcella: we at the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit are proud to know you, work with you and your company, and learn with you! Thank you for your leadership vision of management as a noble profession, and for showing all of us how to unite success with significance!

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Invitation from David Cooperrider to the World Positive Education Accelerator

Invitation from David Cooperrider to the World Positive Education Accelerator | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
I would like to personally invite you to join me for one of the most exciting projects of my career: the World Positive Education Accelerator. This event, supported by many of us here at the Weatherhead School of Management and the University of Pennsylvania MAPP program and colleagues from Brazil to the India, is being co-convened by Champlain College’s David L. Cooperrider Center for Appreciative Inquiry and the International Positive Education Network (IPEN) The event is a four-day gathering of educators, academics, policymakers, families, students, and businesses from nearly three dozen countries aimed at accelerating positive education where academics + human flourishing unite as one. As you can read more about on the website, wpea2018.com, we have a vibrant agenda that weaves both cutting-edge practices, research, and innovations in positive education, along with a full Appreciative Inquiry summit process that we know will help accelerate this work around the world. And we need YOUR voice in the room. You have insights and experiences related to this work that we know will bring value to the conversations. And we know you will gain new insights from participating, including inspiration and knowledge about wellbeing and character development in education from birth to higher education and beyond. We believe you will ultimately walk away not only with inspiration, but also the tools, resources and networks to make immediate change in your own institutions as well. Last September, we convened 105 practitioners and thought-leaders from 15 counties to help plan this exciting event. If you have not yet seen it, we invite you to enjoy our 3 minute video summary from that gathering which helps further illuminate the work we are envisioning. Further details about the event are below, as well as attached. We would greatly appreciate your help in spreading this event in your newsletter or social media - here are a host of images, tweets, and graphics for you at http://ipen-festival.com/partnerpromo. For your support, we would like to offer you and your network a 10% discount by using the code WPEAFRIENDS - please share this far and wide! Please email us at positiveeducationsummit@champlain.edu if you have any questions. Thank you in advance for considering this opportunity.
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TURNING POINT: Corporate Progress on the Roadmap for Sustainable Value Creation is Growing

TURNING POINT: Corporate Progress on the  Roadmap for Sustainable Value Creation is Growing | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Record numbers of the largest and most influential companies in the US have been found in this new research report to be committing themselves to ambitious sustainability policies. The optimistic report, tagged Turning Point, has been released by the Boston-based non-profit sustainability consultancy Ceres, which seeks responsible solutions with prominent investors and companies. The findings, following up on an original 2014 assessment, Gaining Ground: Corporate Progress on the Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability, show that nearly two thirds of the more than 600 companies covered are reducing CO2 emissions, and investing in sustainable value creation and a source of industry leadership. In other reports it has been called "the sustainability advantage" and it's about the managerial skills for turning social and global issues into sources of innovation. This Turning Point report demonstrates that hundreds of large companies are in fact "aiming higher"--and that this trend will likely amplify as sustainable value creation becomes better taught, applied, and experienced. 
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Higher Purpose: The Core Foundation Shared by “Heroes of Conscious Capitalism”

Higher Purpose: The Core Foundation Shared by “Heroes of Conscious Capitalism” | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
When we announced our inaugural “Heroes of Conscious Capitalism” Class of 2017 at this past CEO Summit, we knew that each and every one of them were exemplary Conscious Leaders. What also became clear after several interviews with some of this year’s more widely-recognizable honorees were published by Forbes was that there is an undeniable common theme: Each of them were leading their respective organizations toward pursuing a Higher Purpose beyond simply being a profitable company.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Check out these three interviews with CEO's showing how powerful it is to create a high purpose enterprise--to rally people around meaning, purpose, and values. Campbell Soup Company’s Denise Morrison, Unilever’s Paul Polman, and PepsiCo’s Indra Nooyi to see how a sense of Purpose deeply permeates each of their companies, providing a solid foundation for business success as measured by a multitude of meaningful metrics.
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Wild is the wind: the resource that could power the world

Wild is the wind: the resource that could power the world | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Toulson has a slide that shows one very clear reason for the falling cost of wind energy. Over time, the diameter of the blades have enlarged. A turbine commissioned in 2002 swept 80 metres; in 2005, that figure rose to 90 metres; in 2011, it was 120 metres. By 2020, it will be 180 metres.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Did you know that there is enough wind globally to power all of humankind's energy needs 50x over? So how about a wind farm out in the ocean the size of India? How about blades that sweep a diameter of 492 feet? These things are happening and the winds of change show how wind prices are plummeting. Wind is a metaphor for change, the passage of time, the past and the future (“The answer, my friend …”). It blows through the art of Van Gogh, through Hokusai to the far western tip of Cornwall, and Gill Watkiss, whose landscapes are peopled by figures permanently bent, snapped over by the wind, hair whipped. “I like to feel it playing havoc with me,” she says. “You feel alive.” And that's what we are finding in companies too...as companies go into 100% renewable energy their people report more energy, they feel more alive. We call this resonance "mirror flourishing" because when one part of a system moves toward flourishing so do all other interrelated systems. Wild is the wind, says this article, and wild are the possibilities that we can and will likely see in our lifetime!  
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Is There Hope for a Better World?

Is There Hope for a Better World? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Donald Trump. North Korea. Hurricanes. Neoliberalism. Is there any hope of a better world? Yes, but we have to come together to tell a new, kinder story explaining who we are, and how we should live
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
This is a thoughtful article about not only the power of grand narrative, but the need to start shaping it-and at its core it’s about the goodness and uniqueness of the human being. Could it be that we have glossed over our relational qualities of altruism, supercooperation, and core of caring? Over the past few years, there has been a convergence of findings in different sciences: psychology, anthropology, neuroscience and evolutionary biology. Research in all these fields points to the same conclusion: that human beings are, in the words of an article in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, “spectacularly unusual when compared to other animals”. This refers to our astonishing degree of altruism. We possess an unparalleled sensitivity to the needs of others, a unique level of concern about their welfare, and a peerless ability to create moral norms that generalise and enforce these tendencies. We are also, among mammals, the supreme cooperators. We survived the rigours of the African savannahs, despite being weaker and slower than our predators and most of our prey, through developing a remarkable capacity for mutual aid. This urge to cooperate has been hard-wired into our brains through natural selection. Our tendencies towards altruism and cooperation are the central, crucial facts about humankind. But something has gone horribly wrong.
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Electric Cars May Rule the World’s Roads by 2040

Electric Cars May Rule the World’s Roads by 2040 | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
New analysis suggests the gasoline engine may be like the horse-and-buggy a century ago: doomed to a rapid demise.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Based on how quickly horses and buggies disappeared in the early 1900s, the researchers argue, more than 90 per cent of all passenger vehicles in the U.S., Canada, Europe and other rich countries could be electric by 2040.
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Psychology and Organizational Behavior Education beats business training when it comes to entrepreneurship: Science

Psychology and Organizational Behavior Education beats business training when it comes to entrepreneurship: Science | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Psychology beats business training when it comes to entrepreneurship

Among small-business owners in Togo, at least
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The Economist reports an intriguing study published in Science Magazine. If you were going to take very small enterprises, and give them business training (finance, marketing, strategy, etc) OR give them human science education on psychology, for example optimism, goal setting, motivation, group dynamics and relationships, etc--which would produce more achievement, business success, and innovation potential? As they report in Science and now The Economist, the researchers split the businesses into three groups. One group served as the control. Another received a conventional business training in subjects such as accounting and financial management, marketing and human resources. They were also given tips on how to formalise a business. The syllabus came from a course called Business Edge, developed by the International Finance Corporation. The final group was given a course inspired by psychological research. In the later  monthly sales rose by 17% compared with the conventional/business trained group, while profits were up by 30%. It also boosted innovation: recipients came up with more new products than the control group. The article's conclusion: "That suggests that entrepreneurship, or at least some mental habits useful for it, can indeed be taught. More surprising was how poorly the conventional training performed: as far as the researchers could tell, it had no effect at all. Budding entrepreneurs might want to avoid the business shelves and make for the psychology section."
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Elon Musk: Tesla's now turning its attention to networked versus command-and-control organizational culture to challenge Big Auto inertia

Elon Musk: Tesla's now turning its attention to networked versus command-and-control organizational culture to challenge Big Auto inertia | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
ELON MUSK: TESLA'S INTERNAL COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL CAN CHALLENGE BIG AUTO INERTIA
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Elon Musk knows he not only needs transformational products to win the future and elevate a small but radical company beyond the giant industry incumbents, but he also knows that he needs a company or organizational form where any person can leap the traditional hierarchies, talk to anyone, and do anything, at any level, and at any scale, that serves to advance the purpose and principles of the company. His recent letter is reprinted here--he gave everyone in his company the green light to transcend and leap over any semblance of command-and-control to advance the interests  and sustainability mission of the whole. He calls hierarchical communication patterns "simply dumb" unlike networks that tap the whole of collective intelligence with speed and freedom. Here is the empowering letter--a lesson on leadership for all our students studying sustainable value and flourishing enterprise here at Case Western Reserve University's MBA, EMBA, and MPODs! 

Subject: Communication Within Tesla by Elon Musk 

 "There are two schools of thought about how information should flow within companies. By far the most common way is chain of command, which means that you always flow communication through your manager. The problem with this approach is that, while it serves to enhance the power of the manager, it fails to serve the company. Instead of a problem getting solved quickly, where a person in one dept talks to a person in another dept and makes the right thing happen, people are forced to talk to their manager who talks to their manager who talks to the manager in the other dept who talks to someone on his team. Then the info has to flow back the other way again. This is incredibly dumb. Any manager who allows this to happen, let alone encourages it, will soon find themselves working at another company. No kidding. Anyone at Tesla can and should email/talk to anyone else according to what they think is the fastest way to solve a problem for the benefit of the whole company. You can talk to your manager's manager without his permission, you can talk directly to a VP in another dept, you can talk to me, you can talk to anyone without anyone else's permission. Moreover, you should consider yourself obligated to do so until the right thing happens. The point here is not random chitchat, but rather ensuring that we execute ultra-fast and well. We obviously cannot compete with the big car companies in size, so we must do so with intelligence and agility. One final point is that managers should work hard to ensure that they are not creating silos within the company that create an us vs. them mentality or impede communication in any way. This is unfortunately a natural tendency and needs to be actively fought. How can it possibly help Tesla for depts to erect barriers between themselves or see their success as relative within the company instead of collective? We are all in the same boat. Always view yourself as working for the good of the company and never your dept. Thanks, Elon"
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New Survey Explores The Value Of Renewable Energy To Corporations

New Survey Explores The Value Of Renewable Energy To Corporations | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Cost Parity Finds More Corporations Investing in Renewables
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Its fun to watch my son Matt's company--Apex Clean Energy--grow and help define the philosophical basis of what the founder has called "the new energy ethic."  Here Apex teams up with the magazine GreenBiz to present the survey results with business leaders. "More renewable energy, more value" is the theme.  The main takeaway is that corporations transitioning to renewables are also adopting a more holistic approach to business. The majority (65 percent) of survey respondents cite the primary importance of cost in their renewable energy purchases, but other factors also feature strongly. Corporate goal-setting is a strong driver of renewable energy purchases, cited by 70 percent of respondents. That finding is backed up by the premium that most respondents (65 percent) place on establishing their brand as a renewable energy leader.
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Lindsey Godwin--PhD Alum from the Weatherhead School of Management's OB PhD-- Receives the Robert P. Stiller Endowed Chair at Champlain College

Celebrating Faculty and Staff Accomplishments and Awards
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
While Lindsey Godwin was working on her PhD dissertation research on  "moral imagination"  at Case Western Reserve University she was also helping the Weatherhead School of Management create the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit. Today we at the Fowler Center want to celebrate Lindsey Godwin!  She has just been awarded the Robert P. Stiller Endowed Professorship at Champlain College! We love it when our graduates not only succeed, but move forward advancing the theory-practice, and the vision of a world where business can excel, all people can thrive, and nature can flourish. Three cheers... on your great accomplishment!
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Can an Economy Survive Without Corporations? Technology and Robust Organizational Alternatives | Academy of Management Perspectives

We are living through a radical shift in how business is organized in the United States and around the world. In many sectors, the corporation—the dominant economic form of the 20th century—is under siege.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Why are we seeing so many new kinds of businesses--the B-corp, the small local social business with high purpose beyond profit, conscious capitalism types of business, and platforms for the collaborative economy--why are we seeing such a big shift. Could it be we are seeing these new forms because "small is beautiful" and less expensive to run?   Shareholder-owned corporations were dominant for much of the 20th century in the United States, yet their numbers are substantially declining in the 21st. This article--its a really good one-- argues that we are observing a regime shift in the transaction costs of organizing that disfavors traditional corporations. Accompanying this shift is the emergence of low-cost, small-scale production technologies that will allow locally based universal fabrication facilities. In combination, these changes are compatible with new forms of non-corporate enterprise. While corporations are basic units of production in many theories about the economy, they should be regarded as only one hypothesis about how production is and can be organized. Traditional alternatives to the corporation include producer and consumer cooperatives (e.g., Land o’ Lakes, REI) and mutuals (e.g., State Farm, Vanguard). More recent possibilities include commons-based peer production (such as Linux and Wikipedia) and “platforms” that connect buyers and sellers (such as Uber and Airbnb). The raw materials are available for more democratic and locally oriented enterprise. Management scholarship has an opportunity to document and encourage this movement. See this thoughtful article written by Jerry Davis.
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Inside Walmart’s Lofty Project Gigaton: How One Company's Strategic Choice "To Lead" Instead of "Just Keep Up" Can Accelerate Achievement of our Global Goals

Inside Walmart’s Lofty Project Gigaton: How One Company's Strategic Choice "To Lead" Instead of "Just Keep Up" Can Accelerate Achievement of our Global Goals | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The global production and use of consumer products – from supplier to retailer to consumer – now accounts for 60 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions and by 2025 will generate 2.2 billion tons of municipal solid waste per year according to estimates from The Sustainability Consortium.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Sixty-percent of all greenhouse gas emissions can be traced to the global production and use of consumer products. So what is the largest retailer in the world going to do? If you were the CEO what would you do? One strategic choice is to ignore it--and treat sustainability as if it were a drag on the business. Another is to "just keep up" with the changing norms and shifts in society expectations. And a third is to lead. Its to stand up, step up and scale up efforts to turn global issues into business opportunities to innovate, excel, and unite success with significance. That's what Walmart's CEO Doug McMillon is doing. And its big. At its April 2017 Sustainability Milestone Summit, the retailer launched Project Gigaton, a challenge to its direct Tier 1 suppliers to collectively cut one gigaton (1 billion metric tons) of greenhouse gas emissions from their operations by 2030. Most of Walmart’s emissions are produced by its supply chain (so-called indirect or Scope 3 emissions), so this target is significant. It’s also ambitious considering one gigaton falls somewhere between the annual emissions of Japan and Germany. Imagine it: one company igniting a movement that will eliminate the annual emissions the size of of countries such Japan and Germany. Walmart's many sustainability initiatives began in 2005--and this one, its largest, can be traced to an Appreciative Inquiry Summit bringing hundreds and hundreds of Walmart suppliers into the room to design a new sustainability index looking to tell the story of the life-cycle and footprint of every product sold in Walmart stores (for more on Appreciative Inquiry see--https://www.champlain.edu/appreciativeinquiry.) 

The "AI" summit we were part of was designed by the pioneering strategy firm Blu Skye together with faculty and doctoral students at the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit.  https://weatherhead.case.edu/centers/fowler/

For me its a thrill to have been part of it and to see how long term change initiatives like this not only survive but thrive, and grow in magnified momentum over the long term. This is big news in the change management industry where 50-75% of all change efforts largely fail. Big cheers to Jib Ellison, Dave Sherman, and Chris Laszlo of Blu Skye, the sustainability strategy firm that worked with former CEO Lee Scott to help the company to choose: Do we want to just keep up? Or do we want to stand up, scale up, and lead?  http://bluskye.com/

While one book has already been written--Force of Nature: The Unlikely Story of Walmart's Green Revolution--its now time for another!   

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Paul Polman Shows How Every Social and Global Issue of our Day is a Business Opportunity

Paul Polman Shows How Every Social and Global Issue of our Day is a Business Opportunity | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Discover more about Paul Polman, Unilever Chief Executive.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
When Peter Drucker was advising us on the development of the Fowler Center for Business as an Agent of World Benefit we heard him loud and clear: "Every single social and global issue of our day is a business opportunity, in disguise, just waiting for the business leader who sees the future; just waiting for the bold lens of industry leading innovation; and just waiting for effective management." You need to listen to Paul Polman, head of Unilever, a corporation with something like a market cap of $167 billion dollars. You can read about him here but also listen to him speak when he received the Oslo Prize for recognizing businesses that are turning conflicts into peace. For Paul Polman sustainable value is the strategy and core to long term success, good growth, superior performance, growing market cap, and creating jobs. Here is his talk that I share with our Executive MBA students. They love it. It also speaks to millenials--and speaks to what many are calling The Purpose Economy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONj7T6VWgx8  
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A Sense of Purpose Means a Longer Life

A Sense of Purpose Means a Longer Life | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
in a study published just this month, researchers at University College London found that, for people over the age of 65, a sense of purpose and overall well-being meant that they were 30% less likely to die over a period of eight and a half years.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
‘Do you have a strong sense of purpose, meaning, and passion for  a better world in your life?’ If you answer yes to this question, then you may have a 15% higher chance of still being alive in the 2028. That sounds crazy, but indeed it’s based on longitudinal research – in 2000, more than 6000 people were asked this and similar questions. In Man's Search for Meaning Victor Frankl demonstrated how sense of meaning is absolutely life promoting.  Frankl, as we all know, was in a concentration camp where everything was taken from him and others, and yet he saw resources, relationships, and regenerative possibilities that gave life to many, and built a whole new edifice and field of transformational capacity in psychology. There are examples after examples of Frankl's idea of finding the life-promoting meaning in the midst of extreme suffering; they are threaded throughout his accounts in the harsh conditions of the Nazi concentration camps. In his 1959 book--"Saying Yes to Life in Spite of Everything: A Psychologist Experience the Concentration Camp" he said, "What is to give light must endure burning."  What's important about the London study cited in this article is that we are heading into an era that's been called The Purpose Economy (see Aaron Hurst's book)--and I have seen how people flourish, and companies prosper, when the sense of real purpose is ablaze. For example I  interviewed an associate at the Tesla display store in Amsterdam. The young person was alive. He was responsive. He was as bright about the technical questions I asked as anyone at "the shop floor level" I have ever seen. I wondered why. I asked him:"can you tell me--what's your job here at Tesla?" He did not hesitate a moment: "My job is to electrify the renewable energy age" he said. But, I said, what is it that you do here at Tesla in this display center? He said "I told you--my job, and i feel so privileged, is to electrify the renewable energy age!"  Then i tried a different angle. I still wanted to understand his job. This time I wanted to make it simple. So I asked "When you tell your mother what you do in your job, what do you tell her about your work?" He said it again: "Just as I've shared with you I have shared it with my mother, that is, my job is to electrify the renewable energy age, and Tesla might well be the best company in the world today to help me help get this task of historic magnitude actually done." Wow. And with this sense of Purpose and meaning, not only is everyday at work a special mission, but we can bet that with this kind of flourishing this young person will actually boost his odds of being healthier and live longer that those working without a sense of life-giving purpose. We call this dynamic "mirror flourishing"--whereupon by a company and its people doing good to help the world to flourish "out there" guess who also really flourishes? Yes "the out there" becomes "the in here" and this dynamic is predictable--yes it's no accident that the young Tesla missionary was so impressive at work-- and this health enabling dynamic is demonstrated over and over at this storytelling site called www.aim2flourish.com.   
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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, March 19, 9:27 AM
Just like happiness, leading a meaningful life is also associated with a longer life!
Ziggi Ivan Santini's comment, March 20, 5:23 AM
These news are from 2014, so obviously not "published just this month"
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Dalai Lama: We need an education of the heart

Dalai Lama: We need an education of the heart | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
My wish is that, one day, formal education will pay attention to the education of the heart, teaching love, compassion, justice, forgiveness, mindfulness, tolerance and peace. This education is necessary, from kindergarten to secondary schools and universities. I mean social, emotional and ethical learning. We need a worldwide initiative for educating heart and mind in this modern age.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The time has come to understand that we are the same human beings on this planet. Whether we want to or not, we must coexist. We need more than education of the mind, says this article--we need education for the heart. If we want a world of prosperity and full spectrum flourishing we need that intrinsic motivation that comes from that sense of interconnectedness, where caring for well-being is intrinsic. All of this, of course, speaks to the research on emotional intelligence and great leadership (Boyatzis and Goleman) as well as the quantum physics view of the "entanglement" of everything (Laszlo and Tsao)...  
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Michael Plishka's curator insight, December 9, 2017 12:59 AM
 What ethics guides our innovation? 
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Can we use business to better the planet? 

Can we use business to better the planet?  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Can we use business to better the planet? This new documentary explores a path. Check out the #ProsperityFilm.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
Can business really make a net-positive impact on our world? Do we have the power to shape a global transition to a flourishing world? In our work on Business as an Agent of World Benefit we are searching for the greatest business innovations on the planet that serve to create shared value--good for the planet and people, and good for the business success of a company. Is a world of full spectrum flourishing possible? Customer sentiment is a key. And so is innovation guided by positive intent. Here is a video that was just released capturing the stories of executive innovators.  Complimentary access to filmmaker Pedram Shojai’s latest thought provoking documentary, “Prosperity.” You can watch the full film during this special screening event here. https://go.well.org/prosperity/movie/view/can-we-use-business-to-better-the-planet-this-new-documentary-explores-a-path-check-out-the-prosperityfilmccla/ ;  “Prosperity” is a bold new documentary that takes us from NYC to Panama to explore the potentials of concious capitalism and the concept of Business as an Agent of World Benefit to elevate humanity through business. It is a film you will want to watch multiple times…and it's a world conversation I  encourage you to share with your students, family and friends.
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Michael Plishka's curator insight, December 9, 2017 12:52 AM
Can we use business to better the planet? This new documentary explores a path. Check out the #ProsperityFilm.
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How A Former Accenture CEO Turned Failing Leadership Into "Growth Through People" Taking Pride Not Just in Their Jobs But the Success of the Whole Business

How A Former Accenture CEO Turned Failing Leadership Into "Growth Through People" Taking Pride Not Just in Their Jobs But the Success of the Whole Business | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
It became apparent to me that to effectively inspire people, in my case more than 100,000, my leadership team and their direct reports needed to understand this.

“WHEN PEOPLE TAKE PRIDE IN THE BUSINESS, THEY FOCUS MORE ON CUSTOMER NEEDS AND DELIVER INNOVATION.”
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The former CEO of Accenture orchestrated a turnaround. And it was based on "the biology of leadership"---a crash course on the neuroscience of human action and relationships. Here are the interrelated steps and components of this CEO's upward spiral: 

1. When you focus on your people, you are communicating that you care. When people know you care, it inspires them to take pride in the business. 

 2.When people take pride in the business, they focus more on customer needs and deliver innovation. 

3.  Innovation helps to differentiate your business and sets you apart from the competition because you are actually delivering the products and services your customers need and want. 

4. When you differentiate your products and services you will win more in the market, and there is nothing like winning to build a team and a business. 

 5.  You are winning, and when you win you grow the business in revenue and profitability.  

6. You are growing, taking market share from your competitors and driving your business to be the market leader. 

7.  Back at the beginning:  You celebrate and reinforce your success by acknowledging, recognizing and rewarding your people. This inspires  more, and an upward spiral develops.
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Wind power is now cheaper than nuclear – the energy revolution is happening

Wind power is now cheaper than nuclear – the energy revolution is happening | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Government policy means the cost of offshore wind energy has halved. The benefits to the UK will be enormous, says John Sauven, director of Greenpeace
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
With the hurricane of bad news—where it sometimes seems there is no good news—there are quiet revolutions that need to be celebrated. By the 2020s wind energy will be as cheap or cheaper than any other form of power generation. It’s just become much cheaper than nuclear, even taking into account the additional costs associated with the wind’s intermittency.
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Is the World Falling Apart? Not at All.

Is the World Falling Apart? Not at All. | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Bill Gates is on a mission to prove that things are getting better—despite what you see on the news.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
A lot of people look at the news these days and think that the world is falling apart. Bill Gates says:" I have a different view. I think the world has never been better—more peaceful, prosperous, safe, or just. And I’m on a mission to prove it." What Gates is arguing is that we need to be looking more at the trend lines than the headlines. Yes we have lots on our hands as a human family. But if we look at the long arc of time and ask what's changed, what's better and where and why--what we might discover is that because things have gotten better that they can become better. In the new book Homo Prospectus--arguing that the human being is a prospecting being, always projecting ahead of ourselves--and that the way we see the future has huge impact or conditions everything we do in the present. We are anticipatory beings. If we believe things can get better and better it obviously impacts our imaginative capacities, our effort, and our capacity to shape our collective willpower. Also see Rosabeth Kanter's book "Confidence"--its defined as the experience of victory ahead of the success. So between Gates webtalk (follow the links), and the book Homo Prospectus (Seligman et al, 2017) and Kanter's Confidence, there is an interesting case to be made for noticing progress and possibilities, and exploring the proposition that "if things have gotten better, then they can get better."
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VW's Dieselgate bill hits $30 bln after another charge

VW's Dieselgate bill hits $30 bln after another charge | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The German group is struggling to put the two-year-old “Dieselgate” scandal behind it, and working to transform itself into a maker of mass-market electric cars.
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
What a case study on the defensive need to be a leader and not a laggard in an increasingly sustainability conscious world. VW, Europe’s biggest automaker, admitted in September 2015 that it had used illegal software to cheat U.S. diesel emissions tests, sparking the biggest business crisis in its 80-year history. Before Friday, it had set aside 22.6 billion euros ($26.7 billion) to cover costs such as fines and vehicle refits, and already its still growing bill is now $30 billion. At one point is this tragic story the company's market cap dropped in half. I love to ask my MBA students to take this case and design the turnaround transformation, paying attention to people, corporate culture, global sustainability's earth call and opportunities, stakeholder trust, shareholder expectations, and their theory of change. I ask them to read Chris Laszlo's books on Sustainable Value, and Embedded Sustainability (with Nadya Zhexembayeva) and Flourishing Enterprise. And almost  immediately all the students point to a Tesla and treat VW more as a poorly run business--with so little ahead of the curve business and society vision of the sustainability boom in our midst-- more than "just" a massive ethical breach drenched in bureaucracy. I'll report back when student teams have imagined what they--as design thinkers applying design thinking to a traumatized business-- would do at this stage.  
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2017 Annual Conference - OD Network

2017 Annual Conference - OD Network | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Call of our Time: OD Innovating for Impact
David Cooperrider & Christopher Johnston's insight:
The field of Organization Development has been at the forefront of helping organizations succeed in a changing world through emphasizing the human factors in leading change in ways that are empowering of people, and based on values of collaboration, a spirit of inquiry, and the goal of full spectrum flourishing. Case Western Reserve University helped create the field with the 1st PhD in the field in 1960 and today its Masters in Positive Organization Development is pioneering once again . And our program is active in supporting the  the OD Network's annual international conference, happening in mid October. Help us get the word out:  Our world faces great opportunities — rebuilding trust in our financial systems and global relationships, turning around inequality and poverty, caring for our environment, shifting from less harm to full spectrum flourishing, and lifting up education and healthcare. Organization Development — being creative, inspirational, and deeply practical — is poised to inspire and generate the innovation being called forth by our organizations, communities, and society. The 2017 Conference invites all of us to think differently about our work, not as intervention but rather as innovation and delivering impact. Our conference will combine learning from thought-leaders and practitioners with hands-on action learning in multi-stakeholder client systems. Be part of the innovation in OD that will answer the call of our time. It is our time! We can create a world where business can prosper, people can flourish, and nature can thrive--and its the transition from here to there that represents the call of our time. 
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