Business as an Agent of World Benefit
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Business as an Agent of World Benefit
Sustainable design; green economy; csr; sustainable development; Business as an Agent of World Benefit; Appreciative Inquiry; David Cooperrider; CSR
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World’s Biggest Investor Tells C.E.O.s Purpose Is the ‘Animating Force’ for Profits 

World’s Biggest Investor Tells C.E.O.s Purpose Is the ‘Animating Force’ for Profits  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Mr. Fink this year is amplifying his last year's message of making a difference in a world that has a vacuum of leadership. Its crucial that businesses also make“a positive contribution to society” — and that this CEO plans to hold them to account.

Coming from the world’s largest investor, the letter was seen as an inflection point in the long-simmering argument over the state of global capitalism.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Perhaps BlackRock CEO Lawrence Fink summed it up best when last year he told the corporate world that if they want any of the $6 trillion in assets that BlackRock manages, they need to pursue more than just profit and that they need to make a difference in the world. And there is a better business logic. This year Fink amplified the why and the how of higher purpose.

When companies put purpose first, they have the power to unify their people in a culture of doing good, create more authentic bonds with their workforce and consumers, and truly differentiate themselves while progressing towards important social and environmental goals. Purpose is no longer a nice-to-have, it’s a business imperative. As Chris Jarvis, Chief Strategy Officer of Realized Worth, pointed out the sort of social movement that we’re seeing and talking about can be counted on to create its own energy, allowing for exponential growth and impact. Executives, according to Mr. Fink, must be prepared to think about social considerations as they encounter a new generation of workers, managers and investors. “With unemployment improving across the globe, workers, not just shareholders, can and will have a greater say in defining a company’s purpose, priorities and even the specifics of its business,” he wrote. Although Mr. Fink did not offer examples, the past year did provide them. Employees at Google held walkouts over the company’s handling of sexual misconduct allegations against top executives and staged a separate protest that ended its role in the Pentagon’s Project Maven, which uses artificial intelligence to interpret video images and could be used to improve the targeting of drone strikes. “This phenomenon will only grow as millennials and even younger generations occupy increasingly senior positions in business,” Mr. Fink wrote. He pointed to a survey by Deloitte that asked millennials what businesses should try to achieve. “Improve society” was chosen by 63 percent more respondents than “generate profit.” Mr. Fink also suggested that the millennial generation’s priorities would change the very metrics that were used for investing.
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Capitalism needs a new generation of inspired leaders

Capitalism needs a new generation of inspired leaders | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
A powerful vision for how a company can benefit the world–and not just stockholders–can have amazing effects on employees’ sense of mission.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The Economist, in a recent cover headline--The Next Capitalist Revolution-- speaks about the loss of confidence in big business and the questioning of capitalism: “The sense of a system rigged to benefit the owners of capital at the expense of workers is profound. A recent survey found that more than half of young Americans no longer support capitalism. This loss of faith is dangerous, but is may also be warranted.” So around 500 years in, capitalism is challenged. Undoubtedly the most powerful force to have shaped the world we live in—the long arc of progress of humankind’s escape from poverty, better health and life-span, and innovation in virtually every sphere of life-- it is also the cause of an unprecedented climate crisis, extreme wealth inequality and conflict, and general discontent. And on the inside of the firm what’s happening? The authors of this recent Fast Company article cite studies showing that only 14% of Americans strongly agree that the values of their employer match their own, and Gallup again recently found that 85% of workers are “disengaged” in their work. From a wealth-and-power leadership agenda, you get a downward spiral: disengaged teams and disaffected customers and stakeholders, leading to even greater internal challenges. What’s being called for? We’ve all heard of the “purpose imperative” and the call for shared value creation—goods and services that are good for the business and net-positive for the world. Larry Fink, head of the largest investment firm in the world Blackrock, shared that they, for one, are going to be investing more and more in inspired, high purpose companies. And what does this require, that is, to create companies that generate large amounts of intrinsic motivation and passionate employees and stakeholders? It requires inspired leaders who create organizations that contribute more to the world than they extract. Instead of extractive capitalism the authors speak to the idea of generative capitalism. Generative capitalism contributes new value to the world; extractive capitalism re-allocates existing value. There are famous examples highlighted in this article like Paul Polman, Unilever’s recently retired CEO and champion of the company’s Sustainable Living Plan–a combined business and social impact agenda. Or Rose Marcario, CEO of Patagonia, whose company sued the federal government to preserve national lands. Marcario epitomizes what inspired leaders sound like: “My whole self is here. My values, my passion, my sense of urgency.” And this simple fact is no accident either: during her tenure, profits have tripled.
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A Drucker Institute Study of 752 U.S. Firms Says These Are the Best-Managed Companies in the US

A Drucker Institute Study of 752 U.S. Firms Says These Are the Best-Managed Companies in the US | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Inc.'s Company of the Year is coming soon...
In the meantime, get to know Patagonia, one of the contenders for the title. Business is booming for the outdoor retailer--the company booked around $1 billion in revenue in 2017--even as Patagonia gets ever more unabashedly political in its messaging. Last year, the company sued the Trump administration. Its latest move takes aim at his corporate tax cuts.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
What makes the best run companies? According to the folks at Claremont Graduate University's Drucker Institute, who analyzed 752 U.S. firms to figure out the best-managed companies in America, it all comes down to five factors: customer satisfaction; employee engagement and development; innovation; social responsibility, and financial strength Their results:The number-1 company is Apple, where design, financial strength, and advances  in social responsibility and commitment to 100% renewable energy, put it at the top of the list.
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Five Global Problems And How You Can Profit and Innovate For Them

Five Global Problems And How You Can Profit and Innovate For Them | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
15 solutions for five of the most pressing issues we face right now, and ideas on how you could start a new business around it.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Real Leaders magazine is advancing our basic BAWB premise that virtually every social and global issue of our day is a business opportunity in disguise--just waiting for the primetime and distinctive competencies of agile, innovative business and entrepreneurship. They argue that we are in the midst of a seismic change in the way we organize our societies, run our businesses and live our lives. Whether we all stand to benefit from this change is up to our present and future business leaders. Its young people --such as our MBA students-- that will be the ones who can turn the myriad of interconnected risks we face into bona fide and compelling opportunities. Along with the Sustainable Development Goals launched by the United Nations, the annual Global Opportunity Report highlights concrete steps to reach global aspirations for a sustainable and resilient world. In this article by Real Leaders magazine you will find 15 solutions for five of the most pressing issues we face right now, and ideas on how you could start a new business around it.
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Sick Of Paying $5 For Bottled Water? Tap App Will Find You A Drinking Fountain Instead

Sick Of Paying $5 For Bottled Water? Tap App Will Find You A Drinking Fountain Instead | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
“ Tap wants to make it easy for you to find a place to fill up your water bottle, in turn eliminating purchases of single-use plastic water bottles. It has signed up restaurants including Umami Burger and Sweetgreen to join its network.”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
.When society shifts it’s expectations, entrepreneurs invent new businesses. Knowing how the waste of plastic water bottles is filling our oceans, and how wasteful it is to plop down five dollars for bottled water—we all experience it—quick then, what’s the next new business? Can you think of one? The epiphany moment for Samuel Ian Rosen came when he found himself at an airport shelling out $5 for a bottle of Evian water. “Nobody up till now has built a Google Map for (drinking) water,” Rosen, a serial entrepreneur, said in an interview. “Finding water is inconvenient. When I go to Google Map and type 'water fountain,' there is nothing. We solve it by building Google Map for water....We are a search engine. We tell you where the water is.” Beginning Tuesday, consumers in cities from New York and Los Angeles to Amsterdam and New Delhi will be able to download an app called Tap on their mobile phones that will help them find the closest free public drinking fountains and water bottle refill stations at places like airports. They can also refill their bottles at over 34,000 cafes, restaurants and other businesses — from Umami Burger and Shake Shack to Sweetgreen and Barry’s Bootcamp — that have signed on globally in the Tap Authorized Refill Network. Tap said that number is rapidly growing—it’s actually becoming a movement! Again, when society shifts it’s expectations, entrepreneurs invent new businesses. And it’s fun. And that’s what the 17 global goals are doing. They are creating a revolution in expectations—they are an entrepreneur’s dream!
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The Evergreen Cooperatives launch a fund for Employee Ownership

The Evergreen Cooperatives launch a fund for Employee Ownership | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
With its new fund, the Cleveland-based Evergreen Cooperatives have a bold goal: to make it easy to transition a business to worker-ownership.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
When every employee is also an owner--and when every worker is also a manager at the levels of shared governance--the old distinctions between labor and management evaporate. One of the most successful business innovations of this kind is in Cleveland where a new fund has been developed to expand the Evergreen Network of employee owned businesses in Northeast Ohio. Over the next several years, they hope to use the initial funding to convert around seven businesses, and aim to eventually reach $30 million in funding.
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About Shared Value | Shared Value Initiative

New to shared value? Watch the Shared Value 101 Webinar: Starting Your Journey recording to get insight and best practice from leading shared value practitioners at Enel & Abbott.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Shared value is not social responsibility, philanthropy, or sustainability, but the best and most innovative way for companies to achieve economic success.” Shared value is a management strategy in which companies find business opportunities in social  and global systemic problems. While philanthropy and CSR focus efforts focus on “giving back” or minimizing the harm business has on society, shared value focuses company leaders on maximizing the competitive value of turning social problems into new customers and markets, cost savings, talent retention, and more. More companies are now building and rebuilding business models around social good, which sets them apart from the competition and augments their success. With the help of NGOs, governments, and other stakeholders, business has the power of scale to create real change on monumental social and global problems. Here is a useful Shared Value webinar.
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Tesla — Spaceship of a Revolution

Tesla — Spaceship of a Revolution | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
I didn't get into this career in cleantech via engineering, business, or battery chemistry. My first degree was a dual major in sociology and environmental studies, which somehow led to CleanTechnica through a wildly meandering route. I love sociology and still consider it the heart of my career, and the heart of my work today. So, I'm surely a bit biased in how I view Tesla, which is often through the lens of a sociologist
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The key behind a revolution is not a product. It is an idea, and a mission. A revolution--states this CleanTechnica article-- is about righting an injustice. The injustice at hand today is the injustice we are committing against future generations. It is the injustice we are committing against human society as a whole. Through the inertia of the industrial age's unsustainable economy, as well as cultural l inertia, we are guaranteeing a more difficult life for millions or billions of humans. That includes premature death via natural disaster, disease, poverty, drought, famine, fire, heat, and war. Anyone with even a half understanding of climate science puts catastrophic climate change as one of the three biggest threats to the human species. Air pollution costs the US billions of dollars a year in health costs, but air pollution is nothing compared to the existential societal threat of climate change--in short, climate change is beyond comprehension. 

Enter Tesla. Yes Tesla has a remarkable product. But its  industry leading business is a revolution. Beyond "goods" its distinctive advantage is that it is producing "betters." Betters are not things you can touch. They are meanings. Betters go beyond the transactional exchange, because they invite transvaluings, that is, they forge relationships in a common cause where value increases over time. When goods and betters are married you make exchange of value a sacred and circular act, much like a healthy heart circulation is to every living organ.  
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GLI Bending the Arc of Finance for Women and Girls

GLI Bending the Arc of Finance for Women and Girls | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Please fill out the form to download the complete analysis. We will not share your information with third parties.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Veris Wealth investors has just published a powerful story of how to "bend the arc of finance" for women and girls. It starts with the story of  Linda Pei who had a vision... In 1993, she launched the Women’s Equity Mutual Fund, the first U.S. fund investing in companies with positive track records of hiring, promoting and generously compensating women. Her fund marked the birth of “gender lens investing" (GLI), which is founded on the premise that investing intentionally for gender balance and equity can generate both financial and social returns. For decades, however, there wasn’t much progress. Over the next 20 years, only four new strategies emerged explicitly incorporating gender into their financial analysis of publicly traded securities. GLI Blossoms Fast forward to 2018. Over the past 12 months, we’ve seen more growth in GLI in a single year than we have in the past two decades. As of June 30th, 2018, investors had poured $2.4 billion into 35 GLI vehicles holding publicly traded securities, according to the 2017 Gender Lens Investing report from Veris. This is a 23-fold increase from $100 million just four years ago. These investment vehicles range from U.S. and Canadian ETFs, to French and Nigerian mutual funds, to Australian ‘gender equality bonds.’ Click here to download Gender Lens Investing: Bending the Arc of Finance for Women and Girls. Click here to download the 2017 GLI report--https://www.veriswp.com/ Fully Diversified GLI Portfolios As the number of GLI vehicles has increased, investors have begun making the leap from investing in single products to constructing entire, fully diversified GLI portfolios with clear missions. Our 2018 report highlights three of these portfolios, each tackling distinct social issues: gender-based violence, women’s chronic under-representation in leadership, and the need for innovation in women’s health care. This week, Alison Pyott and Luisamaria Ruiz Carlile of Veris will be sharing this research at the Gender-Smart Investing Summit, taking place in London on November 1-2.


The goal of the summit, expected to attract 300 champions of GLI, is “moving gender-smart capital with vision and velocity.” Linda Pei would be proud that her vision endured. Even greater would be her delight at the accelerating flow of capital into public market GLI products: the first $1 billion took 25 years. The second $1 billion took 12 months. How long to $100 billion? The first $1 trillion?
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How to Attract the Betterment Focused Investor

How to Attract the Betterment Focused Investor | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
What's key to winning the support of this growing investment audience is the crafting of a business strategy that incorporates social causes. How to start? I recommend going with the social causes you already care about. This can be win-win-win situation for you, your backers and the global community, and can produce rewards that go way beyond the balance sheet.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Impact investing is growing rapidly and we can expect this trajectory and growth in impact investing to expand way beyond its $100 billion in assets today. Now that the third wave of conscious capitalism has broken--moving from the defensive risk avoidance phase, to the sustainability phase, and now to the net positive impact phase--  stockholders are actively seeking investments that benefit both their portfolio and the planet, fueled by a desire to give back and the ease of the latest reporting technology. Companies wanting to ride the next swell need to take into account how their business models affect the world. Build this thinking into your organization’s DNA and showcase the difference you’re making -- today’s investors will be more than willing to back you.
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Making the Sustainability Business Case: Why MBA Grads are Wanting to Become Part of Firms Such as Accenture

Making the Sustainability Business Case: Why MBA Grads are Wanting to Become Part of Firms Such as Accenture | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
During this broadcast, Adam Cooper, Senior Manager, Global Strategy and Sustainability Practice at Accenture will outline a step-by-step approach for making the link between sustainability and financial performance, showing how to strengthen your sustainability business case share how to leverage risk management to improve your EHS performance. Patrick Browne, Corporate Sustainability Program Manager at UPS, will share the best practices he has experienced with his work at UPS and Tom Hazeldine, Product Manager at Enablon will describe the tools and technologies available and provide case studies that highlight best practices. Joel Makower, Executive Editor at GreenBiz Group will moderate the session.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
An Accenture global CEO survey a few years ago predicted a tipping point in sustainable value--as a C-suite strategic imperative. Now their consulting practice in this arena is thriving. Accenture Sustainability Services helps business achieve substantial improvement in performance and value by adopting and integrating new and innovative ways of working that continually balance positive economic, environmental and social impact. From strategy design to execution, Accenture works across industries and geographies to create new growth opportunities, generate greater efficiencies, drive resource and energy optimization, lower costs,enhance differentiation and, ultimately, grow the perceived value in the eyes of stakeholders, from customers to communities and nature itself. For our MBA students interested in firms such as Accenture, here is a broadcast by Adam Cooper, senior manager of Global Strategy and Sustainability at Accenture, along with several other CEO's sharing the strong and growing business case for "doing good and doing well."  
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Global warming could be in reverse by 2050: Project Drawdown Is Solutions Focused and Systemic

Global warming could be in reverse by 2050: Project Drawdown Is Solutions Focused and Systemic | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
All the solutions have multiple cascading benefits. For example, regenerative agriculture leads to soil regeneration, better water retention and so on, but also sequesters carbon as an added benefit.’
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
We could get to the stage where atmospheric greenhouse gases are in decline – a point known as drawdown – and begin to reverse global warming before 2050, but it will require us adopting solutions at an aggressive rate, according to Chad Frischmann, vice-president and research director of Project Drawdown. Project Drawdown--the brainchild of Paul Hawken-- is a worldwide research and communications initiative with a plan to reverse global warming based on 100 existing and emerging solutions. 
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What Is Disruptive Sustainable Technology?

What Is Disruptive Sustainable Technology? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Disruptive sustainable technologies are those that change the sustainability algorithm. For example, when batteries, sun, wind, LPG and others work together in harmony to deliver the best alternative at the time when it is most efficient.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Being best for the world requires tremendous business skill. One new arena for mastery--business mastery--is at the intersection of disruptive technologies and sustainable value opportunities, often large ones. Think for example about the alignment of artificial intelligence, solar, industrial scale battery storage, and new digital marketing platforms.  Disruptive sustainable technologies are those that change the sustainability algorithm and eclipse the old. Too often we think in terms of isolated disruptive innovations, yet the future requires systemic thinking. For example, when batteries, sun, wind, LPG and others work together in harmony to deliver the best alternative at the time when it is most efficient--this might be the convergence needed to create breakthrough value.   
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How corporations are approaching sustainability and the Global Goals

How corporations are approaching sustainability and the Global Goals | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
To investigate, we studied 40 companies with a strong record on sustainability. A desktop review provided a foundation and structured interviews with executives of 14 of the companies provided detail and nuance. Here is what we learned.

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
A Brookings study argues that the broad trend toward shared value and embracing the world's global goals is not just a trend but a trajectory. Corporations are increasingly building sustainable value—doing good and doing well-- into their business strategies, and linking outcomes to the world’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as seen in the 7,500 companies issuing annual sustainability or corporate responsibility reports in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiative. Given this evolution in corporate thinking and action, the pertinent questions are “why” and “how.” The authors also cite a recent PWC survey of more than 700 global companies, which reports that 72 percent of some of the largest corporations in the world reference the SDGs in annual corporate or sustainability reports, 50 percent identify priority SDGs, and 54 percent mention them in their business strategy. There clearly is a broad trend. On the “why” side of the equation, the “drivers” that link sustainability and the SDGs to the corporate interest can be either business-case or values-case. The business case for the SDGs is perhaps best articulated at a macro level by the report of the Commission on Business and Sustainability—capped by identification of a $17 trillion market potential for four of the SDGs by 2030. Business-case drivers involve maximizing growth opportunities and minimizing risk and are the rationale for 80 percent of the companies studied. A few have moved a step further to a values-case by adopting a corporate values or purpose statement that moves the corporate strategy beyond just financial return.
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What if Apple and Tesla joined forces to help us draw down climate change?

What if Apple and Tesla joined forces to help us draw down climate change? | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Facing each other in a suburban shopping mall, the two innovative retailers share everything and nothing.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
In “project drawdown” there are several scenarios that hold great promise and the message is that we need systemic breakthroughs—and tremendous business participation and innovation. One partnership that could inspire and rewire whole industries would be an Apple + Tesla revolution. One of the members of the I-tunes innovation sees it as a distinct possibility. For me, just thinking in these “improbable partnerships” terms is a contribution. Paradigm transformations require cross boundary collaborations and this one kindles the imagination—and the heart!
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Economics Nobel prize goes to 'green growth' theorists

Economics Nobel prize goes to 'green growth' theorists | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The Nobel prize in economics has been awarded jointly to two academics for championing the importance of the ideas economy and climate change.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The path to a climate-safe world has become a tightrope, and will call for and demand an unprecedented marshalling of human ingenuity, innovation, and inspiration.  Becoming climate neutral by 2050–at a time when the economy’s climate change gases are still rising—will call for all actors, especially entrepreneurs, designers, investors, policy makers, and visionary business leaders—to harness market forces in a positive way and rapidly—to achieve transformative change at a scale commensurate with the epic task. 

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Stephen Hawking: Humans need to leave Earth or risk being annihilated by nuclear war or climate change

Stephen Hawking: Humans need to leave Earth or risk being annihilated by nuclear war or climate change | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Stephen Hawking, who died in March, wrote a collection of essays that were published this week. Hawking believed humans need to leave the Earth to survive as a race. In one of the essays, he wrote that he is worried about the possibility of nuclear war and the devastating effects of climate change.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
In a collection of essays published posthumously in October, Hawking wrote that climate change and the possibility of nuclear war are putting humans in grave danger, adding that the latter is likely the biggest threat to humanity. The scientist, who died in March, wrote in Brief Answers to the Big Questions that people treat the Earth with "reckless indifference," which could result in our own extinction if we don't find another home.

"One way or another, I regard it as almost inevitable that either a nuclear confrontation or environmental catastrophe will cripple the Earth at some point in the next 1,000 years," Hawking wrote.

Hawking said it was hard for him to maintain his optimism in light of all the problems in the world, particularly political instability and global warming. The population is becoming too large for this planet, and physical resources are quickly running out, he pointed out. A number of issues — including deforestation, the extinction of animal species, rising temperatures, and lack of water — can be solved, though we are failing to take appropriate action, Hawking wrote.
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Martha Nussbaum Wins $1 Million Berggruen Prize for Work Going Beyond GDP As the Measure of Wellbeing 

Martha Nussbaum Wins $1 Million Berggruen Prize for Work Going Beyond GDP As the Measure of Wellbeing  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it

Dr. Nussbaum, the author of “Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach,” and other books, was honored for work showing how philosophy “is far from an armchair discipline”--and can enable significant societal change. 

David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Is GDP the best measure we have to track human wellbeing?  It turns out that an increase in GDP is not very strongly correlated with improvements in many of the areas that affect the lives of a nation’s people. So how should we comparatively assess quality of life, if not via GDP? And how can we shift the conversation from a purely economic basis to one focused on people? As an alternative to the focus on GDP, the Capabilities Approach (also referred to as the Capability Approach and the Human Development Approach) was developed to help the world think about what it means to live a full life, and how governments can provide the opportunities to help their people do so. The philosopher and University of Chicago Professor of Law and Ethics Martha Nussbaum has been one of the leaders in developing this approach, along with the economist and philosopher Amartya Sen. This way of thinking about development led to the creation of the Human Development Index, a UN-backed measure that has thankfully been replacing GDP as a metric of quality of life in policy discussions. The conversation about this approach has been conducted in academic circles, mostly among development economists. Martha Nussbaum’s Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach, the perhaps the first book intended to outline the approach for non-specialists. In the book, she outlines what it means to use an approach that takes each individual person as an end. She explains what’s meant by “capabilities” (“not just abilities residing inside a person but also the freedoms or opportunities created by a combination of personal abilities and the political, social, and economic environment”), and presents her list of the ten most central capabilities, the threshold requirements for a life of human dignity.
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The Surprising Advantages Environmental Entrepreneurs Have Over Established Companies

The Surprising Advantages Environmental Entrepreneurs Have Over Established Companies | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Our research suggests that environmental entrepreneurs may differ in important ways from your run of the mill entrepreneurs.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
Environmental entrepreneurs are a unique breed. This article shows how—through several business techniques and examples—they  hold great promise to help us flourish economically, socially and environmentally. Environmental challenges may very well offer the biggest economic opportunity of our lifetime. We look forward to seeing more entrepreneurs rise to the challenge!
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Tata: "The Community is the Very Purpose of Business" 

Tata: "The Community is the Very Purpose of Business"  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Natarajan Chandrasekaran, chair of Tata Sons, sets a strategic course for the 21st century.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
How do you position a $16 billion dollar company to be a perennial industry leading star for decades and decades? The new Chair of Tata Sons sets a strategic course for the 21st century arguing for a social purpose that advances communities. From its Indian roots, Tata has evolved into a global powerhouse in multiple industries, with two main goals. On the one hand, it is fiercely oriented toward shareholder value: It has an aggregate market capitalization of more than US$160 billion and 4 million shareholders. On the other, it is a community-oriented company, with more than 60 percent of shares held by a set of philanthropic trusts that fund health, education, and development in the communities where it conducts business. Keeping these two goals in harmony in an age of technological disruption is the chairman of Tata Sons, Natarajan Chandrasekaran.  This business empire evolved from a trading company launched by Jamsetji Nusserwanji (J.N.) Tata, a Parsi (Zoroastrian), who was born in 1839 in rural Gujarat. His liberal education gave him a lifelong passion for humanism: He believed that the elevation of the Indian people could best be achieved through business. “In a free enterprise, the community is not just another stakeholder in business,” according to J.N. Tata, “but is, in fact, the very purpose of its existence.” 
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American ESG Investing Reaches $12 Trillion Assets--Up 18x since 1995--Compound Annual Growth of 13.6%

American ESG Investing Reaches $12 Trillion Assets--Up 18x since 1995--Compound Annual Growth of 13.6% | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Investors in the United States consider environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors across $12 trillion of professionally managed assets, a new report from the US SIF Foundation concluded. That represents a 38% increase since 2016.
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
The Report on US Sustainable, Responsible and Impact Investing Trends 2018 shows, through research undertaken this year, that the total US-domiciled assets under management using sustainable, responsible, and impact (SRI) strategies grew from $8.7 trillion at the start of 2016 to $12.0 trillion at the start of 2018. “This represents 26% — or 1 in 4 dollars — of the $46.6 trillion in total US assets under professional management,” according to the report published by the foundation supporting US SIF, an organization whose members include investment management and advisory firms, mutual fund companies, asset owners, financial planners, community investing organizations, and nonprofits. In 1995, the US SIF Foundation first measured the sustainable and responsible investment universe in the United States to total $639 billion. These assets increased more than 18-fold since then, the foundation says, at a compound annual growth rate of 13.6%.
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ChargePoint Plans To Install 2.5 Million EV Chargers In Next 7 Years

ChargePoint Plans To Install 2.5 Million EV Chargers In Next 7 Years | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
In his mind, 2.5 million seems like a better number. At the global climate conference in San Francisco last week, ChargePoint announced it intends to add 50 times more chargers to its network within the next 7 years — a truly monumental task.

“Our commitment to deploy 2.5 million charging spots by 2025 comes as the company embarks on the most significant period of growth in our history and in the midst of a revolution in transportation,” says Romano. “The time for transformative change is now and broadly distributed, substantial, and immediate investments in charging infrastructure are necessary to usher in the future of e-mobility.

“One hundred percent of what we do is focused on developing technology that enables cleaner transportation, and ChargePoint is proud to play a critical role in facilitating the transition to electric mobility, and supporting the Summit’s mission to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide.”
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
“Find a need and fill it,” is perhaps the bedrock principle of capitalism. How to fill it, though, is often a matter of some debate. In 2012, there were about 11 EV chargers in America. Elon Musk and his band of merry pranksters looked out from the confines of Silicon Valley and decided the best way to support their dream of an electric car in every driveway was to build their own charging network. Voila! There are now 1,342 Supercharger locations worldwide with a total of 11,013 charging stations in all.
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The Findings of This Massive Global Social Entrepreneurship Study Will Surprise You

The Findings of This Massive Global Social Entrepreneurship Study Will Surprise You | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Social entrepreneurs not only focus on what goes into their pockets, but also on how they can use their platform to give back. In fact, about 52 percent of those included in the survey reinvested profits into social initiatives. In the U.S., many socially focused companies, such as Yoobi and Toms, have become household names. But trend trickles down to smaller economies. The study goes on to explain how the social entrepreneurship trend transcends education level in many regions.

"Social entrepreneurship is about people starting any initiative that has a social, environmental or community objective," says Siri Terjesen, a professor at American University who co-authored the report, in a press release. "It could be students who are starting a product that's based on recycled materials, or a group working to find a solution to irrigation problems in their neighborhood."
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
People across cultures, demographics and continents believe business is about more than making a profit -- it’s about doing good for others--it's about business as a force for good. 

That’s according to a new report released by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) assessing social entrepreneurship worldwide, where social entrepreneurship is defined as any business that has a social betterment, environmental betterment, or community betterment mission. 
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A Direct Economic Gain of US$26 Trillion Because of Bold Leadership Across the Climate Spectrum 

A Direct Economic Gain of US$26 Trillion Because of Bold Leadership Across the Climate Spectrum  | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
The New Climate Economy Report shows how countries at all levels of income can achieve economic growth while combating climate change
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
We are on the cusp of a new economic era: one where good growth is driven by the interaction between rapid technological innovation, sustainable infrastructure investment, increased resource productivity, radical transparency across markets, and where "thick value" is better than "thin value." 

This is the epic growth story of the 21st century according to this new report of The Global Commission on Climate and Economy. 

See https://newclimateeconomy.report/2018/

The next 10-15 years are a unique ‘use it or lose it’ moment in economic history. We expect to invest about US$90 trillion in infrastructure to 2030, more than the total current stock. Ensuring that this infrastructure is sustainable will be a critical determinant of future growth and prosperity. The next 10-15 years are also essential in terms of climate: unless we make a decisive shift, by 2030 we will pass the point by which we can keep global average temperature rise to well below 2oC. We know that we are grossly under-estimating the benefits of this new growth story. Current economic models are deeply inadequate in capturing the opportunities of such a transformational shift

The growth story--the innovation and entrepreneurship opportunity-- of the 21st century can unlock unprecedented opportunities of a strong, sustainable, inclusive economy. According to this new report the innovation-generating benefits of climate action are greater than ever before, while the costs of inaction continue to mount. The new climate economy combined with the 4th industrial revolution capabilities. While recognising the shortcomings of current economic models, analysis produced for this Report found that bold action could yield a direct economic gain of US$26 trillion through to 2030 compared with business-as-usual. And this is likely to be a conservative estimate.

The opportunity is to accelerate the transition to a better, more inclusive, new climate economy in five key economic systems: energy, cities, food and land use, water, and industry.

Our economies are the heirs of the first industrial revolution, driven by the use of hydrocarbons. The coming industrial transformation must take us beyond the era of fossil fuels and develop sustainable solutions to feed, house, and provide access to clean water, employment, and industrial goods to 10 billion people by 2050. All of this will drive the biggest change in business history. What's coming is the corporation of the future: its based on shared value strategy; it is multi-stakeholder intimate; it is radically dematerializing and decentralized; it is shifting from "goods" to "betters" where differentiation goes to the company that is most making a difference; and it is agile, radically (in blue ocean ways) transcendent; and its win-win-win in its intention.  
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An Entrepreneur On A Mission To Help Americans Discover Superfood Moringa

An Entrepreneur On A Mission To Help Americans Discover Superfood Moringa | Business as an Agent of World Benefit | Scoop.it
Lisa Curtis is the Founder & CEO of Kuli Kuli, a food brand pioneering a new superfood called moringa. Curtis began working on Kuli Kuli while serving in the Peace Corps, a company that has grown to a multi-million dollar social enterprise with products in 6,000 stores. She shares her story here
David Cooperrider & Audrey Selian 's insight:
When you have a purpose in life, business becomes a joy and this entrepreneur models it. 

Lisa Curtis believes that champions aren't made in gyms. Champions are made from something they have deep inside them--a desire, a dream, a vision of betterment. 

Read on to see this young leader's new multi-million dollar enterprise, now with products in 6,000 stores. And it all happened because of an attentive, alert, and opportunity focused inspiration she had when she was a peace corps volunteer. She has a strengths, what we call Appreciative Intelligence. Tojo Thanchekery defines this kind of "AI" as the ability to see the mighty oak in an acorn. In this case Lisa could see big future business possibilities in moringa, now seen as a superfood, to advance health and well-being, in ways that create quantitative value + qualitative value, a formula for deep value.     

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