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Rescooped by Debbie Lynch from Pulp Ark's Islamology
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Europe got rid of at least six million Jews and replaced them with 20 million Muslims

Europe got rid of at least six million Jews and replaced them with 20 million Muslims | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it

I walked down the street in Barcelona , and suddenly discovered a terrible truth – Europe died in Auschwitz .. We killed six million Jews and replaced them with 20 million Muslims. In Auschwitz we burned a culture, thought, creativity, talent. We destroyed the chosen people, truly chosen, because they produced great and wonderful people who changed the world.


The contribution of this people is felt in all areas of life: science, art, international trade, and above all, as the conscience of the world. These are the people we burned.


And under the pretense of tolerance, and because we wanted to prove to ourselves that we were cured of the disease of racism, we opened our gates to 20 million Muslims, who brought us stupidity and ignorance, religious extremism and lack of tolerance, crime and poverty, due to an unwillingness to work and support their families with pride.


Via Pulp Ark
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Rescooped by Debbie Lynch from Daraja.net
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20 Years of Democracy through the Lens of South African Art

20 Years of Democracy through the Lens of South African Art | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
Artists are important agents of social critique that hold a mirror to society. In reflecting on 20 years of South Africas democracy, a group of artists in Johannesburg have tapped into the major themes in our ambient culture to emerge with a fascinating exhibition of artworks that distil some of the key issues dominating our national discourse at this important juncture in South African history. SACSIS caught up with curator of the exhibition Farieda Nazier at the Ithuba Art Gallery and discovered that violence, censorship, racism, patriarchy and politics are key themes that stood out for the artists.

Via Firoze Manji
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Rescooped by Debbie Lynch from Arab America Music
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Meet the Muslim Superhero Fighting Bigotry on San Francisco Buses

Meet the Muslim Superhero Fighting Bigotry on San Francisco Buses | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
At the start of the year, the extremist anti-Islamic group the Freedom Defense Initiative purchased 50 controversial ads to be displayed on San Francisco city buses. The ads – perceived as out of step with the city’s largely liberal metropolitan community – called for an end to aid to Islamic countries and depicted a Muslim leader consorting with Hitler, essentially equating Islam with Nazism. In response to these Islamophobic messages, street artists affiliated with the Bay Area Art Queers Unleashing Power acted quickly to cover the ads with vibrant images of Pakistani-American superhero Ms Marvel along with comic-style blurbs trumpeting messages of equality: “Calling All Bigotry Busters,” “Stamp Out Racism” and “Free Speech Isn’t a License to Spread Hate”.

The bus art has been called “graffiti”, “defacement”, and “supremacist criminality” by some, but for an overwhelming majority the culture-jamming demonstration holds a powerful significance. For the first time ever, Muslim Americans have a visible, mainstream superhero they can call to arms. As a major Marvel character, Kamala Khan (Ms Marvel’s alter ego) stands alongside Wolverine, Captain America, Iron Man and the X-Men. Her image is synonymous with her message: freedom of speech belongs to everyone. Ms Marvel comic co-creator and writer G Willow Wilson, a Muslim American herself, likened the bus art to a freedom of speech “call and response”, ultimately summing up her sentiments with a tweet that ended with “Spread love.”

This isn’t the first time comic characters have influenced and informed readers about social-justice issues. Superman has a 75-year history of reflecting and enacting essential virtues such as patriotism, honesty and freedom. A force for good. But we’ve come a long way since the days of homogeneous heroes and damsels in distress. In fact, the largest comic publishers, DC Comics and Marvel, have begun to move towards more inclusive and diverse superhero narratives in both written form and on screen. From releasing the first female Thor title to introducing a mixed-race Spider-Man, Marvel has shifted its spotlight to tell stories more readers can relate to. Agent Carter, a one-shot mini-series spin-off of Agents of SHIELD, with Hayley Atwell reprising her Peggy Carter character from the Captain America films, has had decent reviews. With a Supergirl television series just announced by CBS and a Wonder Woman film set for release in 2017, DC Comics is breaking similar ground. 

Via Warren David
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Darkness.com ☥'s curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:57 PM

The 'Freedom Defense Initiative' --a group of complete douche nozzles, purchased 50 ads to be placed on city buses. Most public transportation bus lines have ad space that can be purchased by corporate entities and even small businesses. This is, in fact, one way that cities can raise funds outside of taxes. Which is why the city agreed to allow the racist messages to appear on their buses in the first place: money talks, bullshit walks. 


So, another group, this one affiliated with the Bay Area Art Queers Unleashing Power, amassed a campaign to cover the ads with female superhero, Ms Marvel, a Pakistani-American, as well as stickers that say things like "Stamp Out Racism", "Free Speech isn't a License to Spread Hate" and "Calling All Bigotry Busters!" This an amazing response to these messages of hate. I hope they all end up covered, personally. 


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Feminist art in China

Feminist art in China | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it

In Beijing, feminists are playing "Bald Girls", a play written in the 1930s by Eugène Ionesco. The exhibition includes three contemporary domestic or overseas female artists of different ages. With their unique art language, they unconventionally challenge the long and established social identity of Chinese women and the concept of gender in China. As feminist artists, they express their cultural perplexity in a consumer society and amid globalization, and take advantage of the great social transformation through which they are able to find their independent and equal voices as women.

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Maureen Rhodes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 12:29 PM

I love the idea of women making a statement in a culture stereotypically opposed to women and equal rights. In China the roles of gender play such a huge role within their culture so to see these outspoken artists is inspiring!

Rescooped by Debbie Lynch from Social Art Practices
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New MA in Art, Education, and Community Practice at NYU Steinhardt

New MA in Art, Education, and Community Practice at NYU Steinhardt | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it

The Department of Art and Art Professions at NYU Steinhardt is pleased to announce a new 34-credit M.A. program in Art, Education, and Community Practice that catalyzes social change through the arts.


Via Jules Rochielle
Debbie Lynch's insight:

This new 34 credit MS program offered by NYU  at Steinhardt focuses on social change through the arts. Its goals are to offer the chance for community, educators, and artists to collaborate to create learning neighborhood- based environments that promote cultural and educational practices that focus on cultural aspects of the community. Personally, I think there should be more outreach programs such as this from institutions of higher learning. Learning communities, including private and public schools should be incorporating studies that promote our globalized world. art is on way to easily develop and foster such awareness.

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Rescooped by Debbie Lynch from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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The Uncommon Core

February 2013 | Volume 70 | Number 5
Creativity Now! Pages 42-46

The Uncommon Core

Jason Ohler

Essential creativity skills and the grammar of new media are missing from the Common Core English Language Arts Standards.

The United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, just look at the Common Core State Standards. If you search the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words creative, innovative, and original—and any associated terms, you will find scant mention of the words and the ideas they represent. Readers should find this troubling.

Supporters of the new standards will likely note that creativity relates more to instructional methodology than to literacy and that the Common Core initiative leaves choices about methodology to teacher practitioners. Although this deference to teachers' judgment is appreciated, there are three problems with this reasoning.

First, producing something innovative is as real an exercise as producing many of the traditional literacy artifacts cited in the standards, such as grammatical sentences and well-developed essays. Our tendency to shroud creativity in an aura of impenetrable mystery prevents educators from seeing creative production as a practical skill that every student can and should develop—just like the ability to read and write.

Second, it's safe to assume that the Common Core initiative will drive standardized testing, which makes it as much a threat as an inspiration. Nearly every state has signed on, making the standards ubiquitous. Students' mastery of the competencies outlined in the standards will become the benchmark against which most students, teachers, schools, districts, and states will be judged. The end result will be that policy groups—from school boards to state and federal agencies—will have a rationale to avoid embracing creativity as a skill in school.

The third—and most urgent—reason to be concerned about this failure to address creativity is that the standards fail to support the United States' reputation for creativity in the global community. This country hasn't been competitive in the arena of labor costs for some time. We're losing our edge in information processing. Everything from technical support for printers to app development can be purchased in the global marketplace, where information workers throughout the world compete quite effectively. Where the United States has maintained its edge is in entrepreneurial ideas that produce economic growth in science, technology, and the arts.

Our insistence on clinging to a high-stakes testing culture that pursues limited notions of intelligence at the expense of developing the skills of innovation puts us at risk of becoming a poor nation. As Yong Zhao (2012) notes, researchers who compare scores on the Programme for International Student Assessment with measures of creativity like patent filings and Global Entrepreneurship Monitor scores find that countries that do well on standardized tests typically perform poorly on creativity markers.

What the Standards Lack

At this point in history, certain competencies and understandings should be outlined in our basic literacy standards. I have four suggestions for what we should add to the new standards, all tied to creativity and technology.

First, artistic skill should become accepted as a foundational literacy—the 4th R. Second, schools should embrace and teach the grammar of new media as clearly as the new standards embrace grammar related to words.

Third, we need to teach creativity and critical thinking together (because they work in tandem in any innovative venture). Fourth, teachers must explicitly teach students how to innovate and must provide opportunities for them to innovate, particularly in relation to technology and living a digital lifestyle.

What Is Creativity?

Before we discuss my proposal in detail, let's define creativity. There's so much research related to creativity and the creative process that defining it is as problematic as defining intelligence. A solid working definition comes from researcher Steven Pfeiffer (2013): To be creative is to produce something original and useful. Alane Starko (2010) echoes this idea, noting that creativity involves the ability to produce something novel (not in an absolute sense, but new to the student) and appropriate. Zhao (2012) actually calls for evaluating students' progress in terms of their ability to produce innovative products.

I'd add to these criteria Sir Ken Robinson's (2011) notion that all creativity involves the informed use of some sort of media. Using a medium can be low-tech—for example, carrying a tune with the human voice—or complex, such as producing a holographic living space. For today's student, creativity almost certainly involves using some kind of digital medium.

Synthesizing these components yields this definition: Creativity involves creating something that is new to the student, that is appropriate or useful, and that demonstrates a command of some kind of media. With this in mind, let's consider what a set of standards that honors the creative imperative might include.

Four Ways to Include Creativity1. Adopt Art as the 4th R

The Common Core standards are clear, detailed, helpful, and above all, representative of common notions of literacy. But they have a structural constraint: They limit "literacy" to a facility with words and numbers—basically, the 3Rs.

People can assuredly be creative in how they use words and in certain realms of mathematics. But traditional forms of literacy now coexist with a new form: the creative, well-designed media collage, which involves putting several elements together creatively. The most common media collage is the web page, but a number of other media constructs also qualify, including videos, digital stories, mashups, stand-and-deliver PowerPoint presentations, games, and virtual environments (Ohler, 2009). In addition, we are seeing the inclusion of media that involve senses beyond sight and sound, including movement and touch. We encounter the media collage whenever we enter the vast mediascape of the Internet, which has become everyone's second home.

Literacy has always meant being able to read and write the media forms of the day. Thus, it isn't enough to simply consume the media collage; we must be able to create it as well. Creating within this environment calls on our abilities to craft a mix of images, animation, music, and other elements, as well as text. In short, being literate in the 21st century requires each of us to be a designer and a multimedia artist.

The limited notion of literacy found in the Common Core standards goes to the heart of the cultural schism that pervades our view of the purpose of schooling. On the one hand, the public loves to call for the arts and creativity as part of a general plea for educational excellence. We listen raptly to Thomas Friedman and Yong Zhao, who warn us that ignoring creativity at school leaves our children wholly unprepared for the world that awaits them. On the other hand, we continue to support school systems driven by high-stakes testing that concentrates only on the traditional literacies and content areas.

I don't see the schism closing anytime soon. Educators are left to build bridges to span the divide. There's no better place to start than to treat art as the 4th R, as a literacy rather than simply a content area.

If the creators of the standards had recognized art as a foundational literacy, some would have considered it prescient. By my account, this move would have been simply realistic and long overdue. There's no question that words will continue to be an important medium. But text-centrism has yielded to the media collage as the new foundational literacy in many areas of life. If the test of a literacy is whether it functions as a language across disciplines, as do letters and numbers, then the media collage clearly qualifies.

It's important to distinguish between teaching about the arts in education and teaching artistic skill in education. Although the former is crucial for a full education, it's the latter that demands we embrace art as literacy. As long as art is considered a content area, its fortunes will shift with the politics of the time. As a literacy, it will become untouchable.

2. Teach Media Grammar

Marshall McLuhan (1964) recognized that every new medium has its own grammar. Part of the shift from the 3 Rs to the 4 Rs involves recognizing and teaching the grammars of the new media. Doing so will help students speak the "language" that media artists use.

The Common Core standards in English language arts and literacy do reference the importance of new media. And the standards do a good job of acknowledging the need for students to learn to read web material critically so they can separate fact from spin.1  What we don't find are references to "media grammar"—guidelines people use to develop successful media. Whereas there are standards that address the correct use of prepositions, linking words, and other conventions of traditional writing, there's nothing like that for multimedia texts—such as a standard addressing how to coordinate music, images, and voice narrations.

The realist in me isn't surprised. Grammatical conventions have evolved slowly, over many years, since literacy first entered mainstream culture. But we're just now entering an era in which the opportunity to make media has shifted from an elite few to anyone with a computer, an Internet connection, and an imagination. This shift is irreversible and spreading, making it clear that we should consider the grammar associated with this new language.

3. Adopt "Creatical" Thinking

Critical thinking and creativity are considered at odds in our approach to schooling. Having standards that reflect the need for both would be immensely helpful. Having standards that blend both into an integrated approach to problem solving would be ideal.

Neuroscientists disagree about the degree to which analytic and creative ways of thinking are really split between the left hemisphere of the brain (for analytical thinking) and the right (for creative). Regardless of whether it's scientifically valid, the idea of such a split works well as a metaphor to describe the two parts of our psyche that seem to have been at war ever since the industrial age pitted rationalists against romantics.

Currently, the "left brain" side is winning the hearts and minds of our school systems. Education planners have great respect for critical thinking, but they tend to view creative thinking as a specialist's language for art majors and gifted students. This is certainly a misguided view; creative thinking is important in any field of work, and it is everyone's birthright.

The real shame isn't that one side is winning but that we endorse the separation of these two important human perspectives instead of blending them into one integrated approach to learning, living, and working. Sir Ken Robinson (2011) describes the inescapable relationship between creativity and critical thinking: "Creativity is not only about generating ideas; it involves making judgments about them" (p. 302). Critical thinking, Robinson says, is part of the iterative nature of the creative process. People work on creating something original by entering the "flow" state identified by Csikszentmihalyi (1990) but then back away from that state to analyze their work. This continues throughout the development process.

This is particularly true in an age of digital tools. Creators in most endeavors can now do something that heretofore was impossible or very difficult: erase. Modifying an oil painting or a handwritten manuscript is tedious and messy. But adjusting a photograph using Photoshop, or a document using word processing, is routine. Anyone with tools and tenacity can now craft something new by creating something, thinking critically about that piece of work, and modifying it. Creative and critical thinking are inextricably intertwined—which is why I propose the term creatical thinking.

There are tremendous benefits to this comprehensive approach to problem solving. Most notably, it leads to valuing the development of new ideas, rather than just thinking critically about others' ideas. When we encourage creatical thinking, students become not just problem solvers, but also problem finders (Starko, 2010).

4. Spur Thinking About Technology

There are many ways to teach divergent thinking and creativity.2  Here I'll suggest several ways to help students think creatively—or creatically—about one topic: technology and the digital lifestyles they lead. Two key ways to spur students' thinking about technology are (1) encourage them to be innovators—to add to the global conversation about new inventions—and (2) help them identify solutions for complex societal challenges (such as global warming or how to live peacefully in a multicultural society).

Students as innovators. An effective way to get students thinking is through what I call the technology innovation game. A teacher describes several ways that innovation generally occurs and then asks students to use each of those ways to come up with something novel and useful. For example, innovation often occurs through sequencing—building on prior innovation. Recall that suitcases didn't used to have wheels. Then someone created a suitcase with two wheels. Now many suitcases have four wheels. What helpful improvement on the suitcase might come next?

I've pitched this question to students, who then produced amazing renditions of future suitcases, with elements like GPS tracking devices and built-in digital scales that check whether a suitcase is over a weight limit—or suitcases that steer themselves. Once they worked through the suitcase example, I'd have students brainstorm improvements to technology-based products; it's important that students use their skills not only as problem solvers, but also as problem finders.

Another way innovation happens is through confluence, the intersection of innovations. Most technologies are combinations of other technologies. To help students understand confluence, I tell them to look around and imagine how they might combine any two technologies they happen to see. What might they produce by combining Twitter and a voice synthesizer? A cell phone and a refrigerator?

Because we want technology to be beneficial, I tell students to imagine a practical goal that their hybrid invention could fulfill. I encourage them to relate this goal to a career they're interested in. One student considering a future in physical therapy suggested connecting a Wii (a device that tracks body movement) to the Internet so a physical therapist could diagnose an injury from afar. The possibilities are endless.

Students as problem solvers—and problem finders. We should encourage students to identify and grapple with societal problems (some that exist as a result of living a technology-infused lifestyle) and imagine how technology could be used to generate solutions. Technology always both connects and disconnects. Once we recognize certain disconnections that technology brings to people's lives, we can often find a way to use those technologies to reconnect people's lives in more helpful ways.

For example, consider the fact that most images people see on the Internet have been manipulated to some degree—often without our knowing it. One group of 7th graders identified this issue as important. They suggested that images posted on the web should bear a number from 1 to 10 indicating the degree of manipulation. Imagine how you'd react to a photo on a news site that was labeled a 7 (highly manipulated). These teens then grappled with how to detect manipulation, which kinds of manipulation actually matter (in terms of changing a photo's meaning), and so on. They were probing much deeper into their digital lifestyles than they normally do.

A Natural Endeavor

We tend to forget that the impetus to create literacy standards wasn't to have standards; it was to ensure that students are engaged and useful in the workplace and the social commons. Literacy is simply the means by which this happens. We need to continually ask what being engaged and useful requires—and see that in these times, it requires being adept in the languages of art, design, and creativity.

Read more....http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/feb13/vol70/num05/The-Uncommon-Core.aspx


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Debbie Lynch's insight:

This article explores the gaps in creativity in the new Common Core Standards. It offers a set of possible solutions. The first being to make creativity on of the "R's". The second suggestion deals with media literacy, or learning to think and speak in creative terms. The third proposal involves using critical thinking and balancing the current focus of left-brain thinking. the current trend being keeping the creative right side of the brain tied to only artistic minded people. It also proposes focusing thinking more on technology. " I think the article hits the nail on the head for what is currently lacking in the Common Core Standards. The arts are as fundamental to learning and cognitive development as the current common core Standards.

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Why Arts Education Must Be Saved

Why Arts Education Must Be Saved | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
Almost every one of us can point back to a creative pursuit, in or out of school, that enhanced our skills, knowledge, or understanding.

Via Holly Tharp
Debbie Lynch's insight:

This article deals with the lack of required Art education in America's schools. It offers links via, Edutopia  which offers examples of the value of the arts in education and how communities are responding with innovative ways to infuse the arts into the classroom. One of the links written in 1997 focuses on how the community of Dallas created a model that increased the availability of art programs throughout their district. The program called Dallas Arts Partners united the district,local  government, and more than sixty art and cultural institutions. I personally believe there should be more institutions like this. In my own district there is a limited art program.

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Censored Street Art and Culture News 2014 - Street I Am

Censored Street Art and Culture News 2014 - Street I Am | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
Censored Street Art and Culture News 2014 - Street I Am streetiam.com/censored- Censored street art & busking, USA to China in 2014. Well financed interests

Via Street I Am
Debbie Lynch's insight:

This scoop offers multiple vignettes with links to articles about street art that is being censored world -wide. It discusses how censoring street art is basically censoring freedom of speech. One such mural by artist "Ernest Zacharevic, a permanent resident nicknamed “Malaysia’s Banksy” by the media" features a lego woman carrying a designer handbag as a lego man seeking to rob her awaits around the corner of the wall. The mural created outrage by bringing attention to the high crime rate in Malaysia. Located in an up and coming area the mural has affected investors and impeded progress towards developing the area.Residents took the mural to social media sites further promoting the high crime rate in the area and further stirring contraversy.

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Thanksgiving Meals for Modern Artists

Thanksgiving Meals for Modern Artists | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
What would Vincent van Gogh's Thanksgiving spread have looked like? Would Jackson Pollock have been as gestural in his deployment of gravy and cranberry sauce as he was with his paints?
Debbie Lynch's insight:

Artist Hannah Rothstein asks and answers  burning questions regarding how famous artists  of the 19th and 20th centuries would have portrayed a traditional Thanksgiving dinner if it to be a piece of art. She states that "although she loves making art it is a selfish act." She satirically plates such pieces  as might have appeared if Van Gogh, Mondrian, and Pollock , to name a few had painted with turkey, cranberry sauce, and the other trappings of a traditional dinner. the best part about her work is that its goal is to promote people donating food to local food banks. Truly an inspiring and humorous approach to helping people stricken by poverty.

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Rescooped by Debbie Lynch from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants | Dara Lind | Vox.com

American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves "a nation of immigrants": a place where everyone's family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life.

 

America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of "inferior" races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America's immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it's still a fundamental truth of the country's history. It's impossible to understand the country today without knowing who's been kept out, who's been let in, and how they've been treated once they arrive.

 

Click headline to view the maps, some of which are interactive, and read about them--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Debbie Lynch's insight:

This is an interesting article about the immigration; forced or voluntary of American s. The maps are particularly interesting. They provide a visual reference for the article. 

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Julia Hoffman's curator insight, January 25, 2015 10:50 PM

This website is fantastic! The fifth map highlighted on the page is very interactive and shows immigration trends over the course of the past 100 years. All of these maps show varying immigration trends. They would fit well with our reporting standard regarding being able to interpret maps.

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The Self-Portrait Project in Haiti – in pictures

The Self-Portrait Project in Haiti – in pictures | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
The Self-Portrait Project went into four camps in Haiti to highlight the ongoing housing crisis. Here are some of the resulting photographs

 


Via Ana Valdés
Debbie Lynch's insight:

An eye oopening visual depiction of the housing crisis in Haiti today.

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Ana Valdés's curator insight, September 28, 2013 8:09 PM

add your insight...

 
Debbie Lynch's curator insight, January 27, 2015 3:00 PM

The multiple displays of these portraits have brought the ongoing housing crisis in Haiti to light. It is an interesting visual commentary that serves to educate people about this plight. I have always believed that education is key to change. hopefully the attention they are receiving will create that change for the homeless citizens of Haiti.

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Social Media Anxiety Disorder (SMAD): The Next New Medical Condition?

Social Media Anxiety Disorder (SMAD): The Next New Medical Condition? | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
Could Social Media Anxiety Disorder (or Social Media Anxiety Syndrome) be the next illness we create?

Via Talmadge Hutto
Debbie Lynch's insight:

Kids today are more at risk for developing social and emotional disorders because of the influence of social; media sites. They are at the mercy of multiple peoples opinions, making them vulnerable to criticism. In addition, to a child that lacks the cognitive and emotional abilities to remove themselves from others posts, may in fact develop anxiety and feel depression based on others posts. Some people put out a fantasy world where all is perfect. Children who face challenges in their own lives, such as  divorce, homelessness, parental addictions, etc. may develop negative self opinions when they compare themselves to the "prefect" world of others.

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Talmadge Hutto's curator insight, July 9, 2014 12:33 PM

Social Media Anxiety Disorder (SMAD): The Next New Medical Condition?" CommonHealth RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 July 2014

 

This site shows how social media can actually be the cause of psychological disorders other than eating disorders.  This is a blog that one woman wrote about her encounter with anxiety after signing up for a Pinterest.  She implies that people have become too focused on social interactions.  They rely on the opinions of others to base their emotions and actions.  Social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, have been known to cause depression and anxiety for some people.  This may be the next plague in the line of disorders caused by social media.  This blog represents how out-of-control the media has become with influencing the public in a negative way.  This blog sparks ideas on what we have in store for the future if we do not take some sort of action.  It is very interesting and relevant to my topic because it shows the seriousness of the issue.  The author of the blog, Martha Bebinger, graduated from Harvard University and currently maintains a career in healthcare.

Debbie Lynch's curator insight, January 9, 2015 4:31 PM

Social media can definitely impact how kids think and feel about themselves, contributing to this epidemic. this is one of many reasons why parents need to closely monitor their kids internet sites. Many sites out there, are sadly devoted to promoting such behaviors.

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Woodmore students begin Olweus Anti-Bullying Program - Press Publications Inc.

Woodmore students begin Olweus Anti-Bullying Program - Press Publications Inc. | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
Woodmore students begin Olweus Anti-Bullying Program
Press Publications Inc.
Woodmore students and staff will be working towards reducing and preventing bullying. On Jan. ...

Via Noah Barringer
Debbie Lynch's insight:

The Olweus program is a comprehensive program that creates a partnership with the school, community, parents, and teachers ot stop bullying. It has a comprehensive training module that teaches staff how to effectively handle both the bully and the victim. It involves an intensive school survey that identifies specific situations, the frequency they occur, and potential hot spots. It teaches staff how to recognize a bullying situation and gives guidelines on following through with administration, parents, the victim, and the bully. It is a partnership that is focused on building a positive whole-school climate. It promotes anti-bullying in all areas of the school. Through weekly class meeting student's are taught how to recognize the signs of bullying and what to do in different situation. Students role play to learn coping skills. These weekly meetings also serve to create a positive school climate, one that ensures a safe learning place for all.

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Noah Barringer's curator insight, March 11, 2013 5:05 PM

Anti-bullying Program

Rescooped by Debbie Lynch from State of Black Science Fiction
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Making History A Mirror: How Does White Supremacy profit from the commonly held belief that there were no People of Color in European History?

Making History A Mirror: How Does White Supremacy profit from the commonly held belief that there were no People of Color in European History? | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
The Original Post in Question. Discusses the role of Immanuel Kant and other Enlightenment philosophers is inventing race, racism, and white supremacy at the intersection of Art and...

Via Alicia McCalla
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Creative Placemaking and the Politics of Belonging and Dis-belonging - World Policy Institute (blog)

Creative Placemaking and the Politics of Belonging and Dis-belonging - World Policy Institute (blog) | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it

Ella Fitzgerald’s “Bewitched, Bothered, and Bewildered” is one of my favorite songs. In her warm and radiant version, you feel each word in pure tones. Ella sings about love—a blind love and the escape from that bewitchment. This is the song that plays in my head when I think about the practices of “Creative Placemaking,” which as an arts manager and policymaker, I define as those cultural activities that shape the physical and social characteristics of a place. I embrace Creative Placemaking in a variety of methods—from city planning to art practices with a goal of advancing humanity. But I am bothered by what I consider a significant blind spot—a blind love of sorts—in the Creative Placemaking discourse and practices. There is a lack of awareness about the politics of belonging and dis-belonging that operate in civil society, and is manifested in racism, classism, sexism, and any other kind of discrimination.


Via jean lievens
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The Banksy Of Egypt: Ganzeer Goes "All American" - ANIMAL

The Banksy Of Egypt: Ganzeer Goes "All American" - ANIMAL | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it

"Mohamed Fahmy, aka Ganzeer, is an Egyptian artist from Cairo who created work in the street both during and after the January 25th Revolution. In 2011, he was briefly detained by Egypt’s Central Security Forces during a crackdown on political dissidence. He was not deterred. And yet, he doesn’t like to be referred to as street artist. “I’m not as good as those guys man,” said Ganzeer to ANIMAL as he was prepping the opening of his “All American” exhibit at the Leila Heller gallery in Chelsea, his first solo show in the United States. “I can’t do the really wicked stuff with spray paint, and control like thin lines to thick lines and all that stuff.”

 

"Street art is just one of many mediums that Ganzeer has deployed to express himself and so the typical labels used by the media to define him are both limiting and not necessarily accurate. However, there are exceptions: Bidoun magazine once described him as a “contingency artist,” and as someone who systematically alters his creative output based on where he is and the situation on the ground, it’s a term he’s most comfortable with. “I can’t stick to one thing at all,” he said. “Right after this [exhibit], I will probably jump to do something entirely has nothing at all to do with screen printing or making images or whatever.”

 

The exhibit is comprised entirely of one-off prints that were hand embellished, making each piece unique and an original. Printmaking is a process that Ganzeer had never experimented with before. While he routinely eschews the jargon thrown around by the art world, “Concept Pop” is a descriptor he uses when referring to his body of work. He explains:

 

Concept Pop is a magical world that exists between conception art and pop art, which is fun, but empty. So you have these two worlds, one is visually compelling in an amazing way but that’s it, which is pop art. And the other thing has so much content embedded in it and so much to say but then it isn’t nearly as stimulating. It’s just about delivering the concept in a stale and boring way. So concept pop is basically merging those two worlds together, having meaningful subject matter but delivered in a very digestible, kind of pop aesthetic.

 

Since May of last year, Ganzeer has been in “New York, Las Vegas and a handful of places,” soaking up the culture. His stay has inspired him to create a whole new body of work, a highly critical take of American culture that explores racism, propaganda, and the security state. Ganzeer says that one of his biggest misconceptions he had about the U.S. was that it celebrated freedom. Noting the MTA’s very Big Brother-like warning that “all bags are subject to search,” he says that such conditions set the stage for a revolution in Egypt. “That’s the reason Egyptians revolted against Mubarak and wanted to take him down is because cops were harassing them in the street,” explained Ganzeer while standing next to an MTA-inspired print. “So we decided alright, we gotta take this motherfucker down. This is the reason people revolt in other countries.”

 
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STEM vs. STEAM: Why The “A” Makes All The Difference

STEM vs. STEAM: Why The “A” Makes All The Difference | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) subjects are the focal point of popular integrated learning systems. However, voices are calling out for the “A” in “arts” to turn STEM into STEAM.

Via Becky Roehrs
Debbie Lynch's insight:

Recent studies indicate a decline in students who will be skilled worker, engineers, and hold higher degrees of learning. The trend led to the formation of STEM- Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. I would argue, in agreement with the article there needs to be one more word added to the acronym- Art, making it STEAM. Recent research on the significance of the arts s a vital part of education indicate students are only receiving a "half brained" education, meaning they are only using the analytical side of their brains as opposed to both sides, the other being the creative side. Research has proven through people like Albert Einstein,and Steve Jobs that a creative approach to learning opens the door for deeper learning, brain development, critical thinking, and problem solving. Nay sayers such as Brian Dunning argue "the importance of art has nothing to do with education." I completely disagree. Art has everything to do with learning.

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Becky Roehrs's curator insight, January 21, 2015 3:19 PM

Research on why arts are essential..

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Educational Leadership:Strengthening Student Engagement:A Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching

September 1995 | Volume 53 | Number 1
Strengthening Student Engagement Pages 17-21

A Framework for Culturally Responsive Teaching

Raymond J. Wlodkowski and Margery B. Ginsberg

Research has shown that no one teaching strategy will consistently engage all learners. The key is helping students relate lesson content to their own backgrounds.

To be effective in multicultural classrooms, teachers must relate teaching content to the cultural backgrounds of their students. According to the research, teaching that ignores student norms of behavior and communication provokes student resistance, while teaching that is responsive prompts student involvement (Olneck 1995). There is growing evidence that strong, continual engagement among diverse students requires a holistic approach—that is, an approach where the how, what, and why of teaching are unified and meaningful (Ogbu 1995).

To that end, we have developed a comprehensive model of culturally responsive teaching: a pedagogy that crosses disciplines and cultures to engage learners while respecting their cultural integrity. It accommodates the dynamic mix of race, ethnicity, class, gender, region, religion, and family that contributes to every student's cultural identity. The foundation for this approach lies in theories of intrinsic motivation.

Before we outline our framework for culturally responsive teaching, we will address the bond of motivation and culture, and analyze some of the social and institutional resistance to teaching based on principles of intrinsic motivation. Understanding these relationships provides a clearer view of the challenges we must overcome if we are to genuinely transform teaching and successfully engage all students.

Motivation Is Inseparable from Culture

Engagement is the visible outcome of motivation, the natural capacity to direct energy in the pursuit of a goal. Our emotions influence our motivation. In turn, our emotions are socialized through culture—the deeply learned confluence of language, beliefs, values, and behaviors that pervades every aspect of our lives. For example, one person working at a task feels frustrated and stops, while another person working at the task feels joy and continues. Yet another person, with an even different set of cultural beliefs, feels frustrated at the task but continues with increased determination. What may elicit that frustration, joy, or determination may differ across cultures, because cultures differ in their definitions of novelty, hazard, opportunity, and gratification, and in their definitions of appropriate responses. Thus, the response a student has to a learning activity reflects his or her culture.

While the internal logic as to why a student does something may not coincide with that of the teacher, it is, nonetheless, present. And, to be effective, the teacher must understand that perspective. Rather than trying to know what to do to students, we must work with students to interpret and deepen their existing knowledge and enthusiasm for learning. From this viewpoint, motivationally effective teaching is culturally responsive teaching.

Locked in Mid-Century

Most educators with whom we have worked would agree that there is a strong relationship between culture and motivation, and that it only makes sense to understand a student's perspective. Why, then, do we have such difficulty acting this way in the classroom?

One major reason is that we feel very little social pressure to act otherwise. The popular media and structural systems of education remain locked in a deterministic, mechanistic, and behavioristic orientation toward human motivation.

If one were to do a content analysis of national news broadcasts and news magazines for the last 40 years to identify the most widely used metaphor for motivation, “the carrot and the stick”—reward and punish, manipulate and control—would prevail. As a result, our national consciousness assumes there are many people who need to be motivated by other people.

The prevailing question, “How do I motivate them?” implies that “they” are somehow dependent, incapable of self-motivation, and in need of help from a more powerful “other.” In this sense, the “at-risk” label acts to heighten our perception of students as motivationally dysfunctional, and increases our tendency not to trust their perspective. The fact that an inordinately high number of “at-risk” students are poor and people of color should cause us to reflect on how well we understand motivation. Thoughtful scholars have suggested that this label now serves as a euphemism for “culturally deprived” (Banks 1993).

Secondary education is influenced a great deal by the practices of higher education, and both levels tend to follow the precepts of extrinsic reinforcement. Teaching and testing practices, competitive assessment procedures, grades, grade point averages, and eligibility for select vocations and colleges form an interrelated system. This system is based on the assumption that human beings will strive to learn when they are externally rewarded for a specific behavior or punished for lack of it.

Schools and colleges successfully educate a disproportionately low number of low-income and ethnic minority students (Wlodkowski and Ginsberg 1995). Because the importance of grades and grade point averages increases as a student advances in school, it is legitimate to question whether extrinsic motivation systems are effective for significant numbers of students across cultures. We can only conclude that, as long as the educational system continues to relate motivation to learn with external rewards and punishments, culturally different students will, in large part, be excluded from engagement and success in school.

Changing Consciousness About Motivation

It is part of human nature to be curious, to be active, to initiate thought and behavior, to make meaning from experience, and to be effective at what we value. These primary sources of motivation reside in all of us, across all cultures. When students can see that what they are learning makes sense and is important, their intrinsic motivation emerges.

We can begin to replace the carrot and stick metaphor with the words “understand” and “elicit”; to change the concept of motivation from reward and punishment to communication and respect. We can influence the motivation of students by coming to know their perspective, by drawing forth who they naturally and culturally are, and by seeing them as unique and active. Sharing our resources with theirs, working together, we can create greater energy for learning.

Intrinsic systems of motivation can accommodate cultural differences. Theories of intrinsic motivation have been successfully applied and researched in areas such as cross-cultural studies (Csikszentmihalyi and Csikszentmihalyi 1988); bilingual education (Cummins 1986); and education, work, and sports (Deci and Ryan 1985). Ample documentation across a variety of student and regional settings suggests that noncompetitive, informational evaluation processes are more effective than competitive, controlling evaluation procedures (Deci et al. 1991, Deci and Ryan 1991).

A growing number of educational models, including constructivism and multiple intelligences theory, are based on intrinsic motivation. They see student perspective as central to teaching. Unfortunately, educators must often apply these theories within educational systems dominated by extrinsic reinforcement, where grades and class rank are emphasized. And, when extrinsic rewards continue to be the primary motivators, intrinsic motivation is dampened. Those students whose socialization accommodates the extrinsic approach surge ahead, while those students—often the culturally different—whose socialization does not, fall behind. A holistic, culturally responsive pedagogy based on intrinsic motivation is needed to correct this imbalance.

An Intrinsic Motivational Framework

We propose a model of culturally responsive teaching based on theories of intrinsic motivation. This model is respectful of different cultures and is capable of creating a common culture that all students can accept. Within this framework, pedagogical alignment—the coordination of approaches to teaching that ensure maximum consistent effect—is critical. The more harmonious the elements of teaching are, the more likely they are to evoke, encourage, and sustain intrinsic motivation.

The framework names four motivational conditions that the teacher and students continuously create or enhance. They are:

Establishing inclusion—creating a learning atmosphere in which students and teachers feel respected by and connected to one another.Developing attitude—creating a favorable disposition toward the learning experience through personal relevance and choice.Enhancing meaning—creating challenging, thoughtful learning experiences that include student perspectives and values.Engendering competence—creating an understanding that students are effective in learning something they value.

 

These conditions are essential to developing intrinsic motivation. They are sensitive to cultural differences. They work in concert as they influence students and teachers, and they happen in a moment as well as over a period of time.

Culturally Responsive Teaching

Let us look at an actual episode of culturally responsive teaching based on this motivational framework. It occurs in an urban high school social science class with a diverse group of students and an experienced teacher.

At the start of a new term, the teacher wants to familiarize students with active research methods. She will use such methods throughout the semester, and she knows from previous experience that many students view research as abstract, irrelevant, and oppressive work.

After reflecting on the framework, her teaching goal, and her repertoire of methods, she randomly assigns students to small groups. She encourages them to discuss any previous experiences they may have had in doing research as well as their expectations and concerns for the course. Each group then shares its experiences, expectations, and concerns as she records them on the chalkboard. In this manner, she is able to understand her students' perspectives and to increase their connection to one another and herself (motivational condition: establishing inclusion).

The teacher explains that most people are researchers much of the time, and she asks the students what they would like to research among themselves. After a lively discussion, the class decides to investigate and predict the amount of sleep some members of the class had the previous night. This experience engages student choice, increases the relevance of the activity, and contributes to the favorable disposition emerging in the class (motivational condition: developing attitude). The students are learning in a way that includes their experiences and perspectives.

Five students volunteer to serve as subjects, and the other students form research teams. Each team must develop a set of observations and questions to ask the volunteers. (They cannot ask them how many hours of sleep they had the night before.) After they ask their questions, the teams rank the five volunteers from the most to the least amount of sleep. When the volunteers reveal the amount of time they slept, the students discover that no research team was correct in ranking more than three students.

Students discuss why this outcome may have occurred, and consider questions that might have increased their accuracy, such as, “How many hours of sleep do you need to feel rested?” Collaborative learning, hypothesis testing, critical questioning, and predicting heighten the engagement, challenge, and complexity of this process for the students (motivational condition: enhancing meaning).

These procedures encourage and model equitable participation for all students.

After the discussion, the teacher asks the students to write a series of statements about what this activity has taught them about research. Students then break into small groups to exchange their insights. Self-assessment helps the students to gain, from an authentic experience, an understanding of something they may value (motivational condition: engendering competence).

This snapshot of culturally responsive teaching illustrates how the four motivational conditions constantly influence and interact with one another. Without establishing inclusion (small groups to discuss experiences) and developing attitude (students choosing a relevant research), the enhancement of meaning (research teams devising hypotheses) may not have occurred with equal ease and energy; and the self-assessment to engender competence (what students learned from their perspective) may have had a dismal outcome. According to this model of teaching, all the motivational conditions contribute to student engagement.

Norms, Procedures, and Structures

Although the above event actually occurred, it may sound like a fairy tale because everything worked smoothly. In reality, teaching situations often become fragmented by the competing needs and interests of a diverse student body. All too often, we use educational norms and procedures that are contradictory. The result is that we confuse students and decrease their intrinsic motivation. For example, consider the teacher who uses cooperative learning yet gives pop quizzes; or who espouses constructivist learning yet grades for participation; or who abhors discrimination yet calls mainly on boys during class discussions.

In an effort to help educators avoid such errors of incoherence, we have compiled educational norms, procedures, and structures that are effective from a motivational as well as multicultural perspective (see fig. 1). Together, they provide an integrated system of teaching practices for our model of culturally responsive teaching. They are categorized according to the motivational conditions of the framework:

Norms are the explicit values espoused by the teacher and students. Procedures are learning processes that carry out the norms. Structures are the rules or binding expectations that support the norms and procedures.

 

Figure 1. Four Conditions Necessary for Culturally Responsive Teaching

1. Establish Inclusion

Norms:

Emphasize the human purpose of what is being learned and its relationship to the students' experience.Share the ownership of knowing with all students.Collaborate and cooperate. The class assumes a hopeful view of people and their capacity to change.Treat all students equitably. Invite them to point out behaviors or practices that discriminate.

 

Procedures: Collaborative learning approaches; cooperative learning; writing groups; peer teaching; multi-dimensional sharing; focus groups; and reframing.

Structures: Ground rules, learning communities; and cooperative base groups.

2. Develop Positive Attitude

Norms:

Relate teaching and learning activities to students' experience or previous knowledge.Encourage students to make choices in content and assessment methods based on their experiences, values, needs, and strengths.

 

Procedures: Clear learning goals; problem solving goals; fair and clear criteria of evaluation; relevant learning models; learning contracts; approaches based on multiple intelligences theory, pedagogical flexibility based on style, and experiential learning.

Structure: Culturally responsive teacher/student/parent conferences.

3. Enhance Meaning

Norms:

Provide challenging learning experiences involving higher order thinking and critical inquiry. Address relevant, real-world issues in an action-oriented manner.Encourage discussion of relevant experiences. Incorporate student dialect into classroom dialogue.

 

Procedures: Critical questioning; guided reciprocal peer questioning; posing problems; decision making; investigation of definitions; historical investigations; experimental inquiry; invention; art; simulations; and case study methods.

Structures: Projects and the problem-posing model.

4. Engender Competence

Norms:

Connect the assessment process to the students' world, frames of reference, and values.Include multiple ways to represent knowledge and skills and allow for attainment of outcomes at different points in time.Encourage self-assessment.

 

Procedures: Feedback; contextualized assessment; authentic assessment tasks; portfolios and process-folios; tests and testing formats critiqued for bias; and self-assessment.

Structures: Narrative evaluations; credit/no credit systems; and contracts for grades.

Based on Wlodkowski, R. J., and M. B. Ginsberg. (1995). Diversity and Motivation: Culturally Responsive Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

 

Teaching in a way that respects diversity is challenging, of course. Consider the following case example. The norm that Mr. Clark, a U.S. history teacher, is aiming for is “sharing the ownership of knowing.” The topic is the notion of cultural pluralism, and, later, the roles that our socioeconomic backgrounds play in our lives. Clark uses the procedures of collaborative learning and critical questioning to facilitate student comprehension of the concepts of “melting pot,” “social class,” and other terms.

Clark asks the class to first brainstorm words that are associated with culture. Students volunteer “language,” “ethnicity,” “gender,” “religion,” “food preference,” and so forth. In pairs, students then talk to their partner about ways in which they believe they are culturally similar and distinct from each other.

After 15 minutes, the teacher asks students to note three observations about the concept of culture. The most prevalent response is that “we were surprised at how much we have in common.” Clark indicates that he sees this as well. He asks the class, “If we have such commonality, why do some groups of people in the United States have such difficulty becoming economically secure?” Note what happen as students struggle over whose perceptions are the most accurate.

First student: Some have more difficulty because of discrimination, because people have prejudices against people whose skin is a different color from theirs.
Second student: I don't think it's that simple. Look how many people of color are doing well. We've got generals, mayors, and corporation executives. There's a black middle class and they are economically secure.
Third student: Yeah, that might be so, but it isn't as many people as you think. The newspapers just make a big deal about minorities succeeding.

 

Clark's ground rules (structure)for this conversation endorse honesty in offering opinions and forbid putdowns, so the tone of this exchange is respectful. Interest in the topic intensifies as a result of the exchange. Clark acknowledges the different points of view and asks the class: “What questions might provide insights or clarify the differences between these viewpoints?” The class breaks into small groups after which Clark records the suggested questions. Some that emerge:

Which ethnic groups are most economically successful? Least successful?What proportion of each ethnic group is lower income, middle income, upper income?Are more people of color economically successful today than 20 years ago? 100 years ago?What is the relationship of educational opportunity to income status?Do middle- and upper-class African Americans and Latinos encounter more discrimination than do European Americans?Is there a difference in the quality of family and community support among middle- and upper-income African Americans, European Americans, and Latinos?

 

As a result of the discussion, students begin to see how the viewpoints about race and socioeconomic backgrounds are part of a broad and complex picture. The difference of opinion has become a stimulus for deeper learning. Students then divide into three groups: one to conduct library research of relevant documents and studies; one to read and analyze relevant biographies and autobiographies; and one to interview community members who represent different cultures.

A Holistic Approach

For culturally different students, engagement in learning is most likely to occur when they are intrinsically motivated to learn. This motivational framework provides a holistic and culturally responsive way to create, plan, and refine teaching activities, lessons, and assessment practices.

References

Banks, J. A. (1993). “Multicultural Education: Historical Development, Dimensions, and Practice.” In Review of Research in Education, Vol. 19, edited by L. Darling-Hammond. Washington, D.C.: American Educational Research Association.

Csikszentmihalyi, M., and I. S. Csikszentmihalyi. (1988). Optimal Experience: Psychological Studies of Flow in Consciousness. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Cummins, J. (1986). “Empowering Minority Students: A Framework for Intervention.” Harvard Educational Review 56, 1: 18–36.

Deci, E. L., and R. M. Ryan. (1991). “A Motivational Approach to Self: Integration in Personality.” In Nebraska Symposium on Motivation: Vol. 38. Perspectives on Motivation, edited by R. Dienstbier. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Deci, E. L., and R. M. Ryan. (1985). Intrinsic Motivation and Self-Determination in Human Behavior. New York: Plenum.

Deci, E. L., R. J. Vallerand, L. C. Pelletier, and R. M. Ryan. (1991). “Motivation and Education: The Self-Determination Perspective.” Educational Psychologist 26, 3 and 4: 325–346.

Ogbu, J. U. (1995). “Understanding Cultural Diversity and Learning.” In Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education, edited by J. A. Banks and C. A. M. Banks. New York: Macmillan.

Olneck, M. R. (1995). “Immigrants and Education.” In Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education, edited by J. A. Banks and C. A. M. Banks. New York: Macmillan.

Wlodkowski, R. J., and M. B. Ginsberg. (1995). Diversity and Motivation: Culturally Responsive Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Raymond J. Wlodkowski is an Educational and Psychological Consultant, 6033 Jay Rd., Boulder, CO 80301. Margery B. Ginsberg is Research Associate, RMC Research Corporation, Writer Square, Ste. 540, 1512 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80202.

 


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DeTrice Rodgers's curator insight, October 7, 2015 11:33 PM

Teaching ALL students without being culturally insensitive

Trisha Ahrent Beamish's curator insight, August 6, 2017 5:06 PM

I choose this scoop because it is a new concept for me.  I am always looking for way to intrinsically motivate my learners, so this framework is something to think about when trying to engage all learners and meet the diverse needs of all students.

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Christie’s Reports Strong Numbers for Postwar and Contemporary Art

Christie’s Reports Strong Numbers for Postwar and Contemporary Art | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
The auction house's total art sales in 2014 rose 12 percent over its 2013 sales.

Via Andre Castaybert
Debbie Lynch's insight:

Christie's auction house of London reports large increase in contemporary art from 2013 to 2014. the reason cited as a growing interest in the primary purchasing age group of 40-60. In November of this year the profits exceeded $850 million. The "general shift in taste" is another reason cited for the increase. It's interesting to observe how peoples tastes in art evolve over time. I'm curious to know what other factors may have led to interest in art of post WWII.

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The Self-Portrait Project in Haiti – in pictures

The Self-Portrait Project in Haiti – in pictures | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
The Self-Portrait Project went into four camps in Haiti to highlight the ongoing housing crisis. Here are some of the resulting photographs

 


Via Ana Valdés, Debbie Lynch
Debbie Lynch's insight:

The multiple displays of these portraits have brought the ongoing housing crisis in Haiti to light. It is an interesting visual commentary that serves to educate people about this plight. I have always believed that education is key to change. hopefully the attention they are receiving will create that change for the homeless citizens of Haiti.

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Ana Valdés's curator insight, September 28, 2013 8:09 PM

add your insight...

 
Debbie Lynch's curator insight, January 24, 2015 3:59 PM

An eye oopening visual depiction of the housing crisis in Haiti today.

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Mumbai Sleeping | Photography: Dhruv Dhawan

Mumbai Sleeping | Photography: Dhruv Dhawan | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it

I began photographing Mumbai Sleeping in the summer of 2009 to explore the diversity of a basic human experience such as sleep. I was in awe of the taxi drivers in particular who slept in such a romantic balance with their vehicles after leaving their families in the rural parts of India to make a living in the city of dreams. 

I was also motivated by the opportunity to photograph people while they are unaware of the camera and to remove the politics of the pose from my images. In this sense I liked to believe I was capturing portraits of the unconscious. 

Of the few people that awoke while I was photographing them, no one objected to my actions after I explained what I was doing. I remain ever grateful to India and its people that allow artists to capture real life without the politics of consent.

Over 350 images later I still find myself compelled to document this phenomena of urbanization in the 21st century where space has become so scarce in a city like Mumbai that 'private' acts are often conducted in public. Mumbai Sleeping is a testament to the strength and human spirit of the lower class urban population that drive the wheel of the city by day and sleep on it at night - forcing us to question whether a good night’s sleep is a luxury or a necessity.


Via Photo report
Debbie Lynch's insight:

Dhru Dhawan's photographic investigation of the sleeping night life of Mumbai is intriguing. By exploring a basic human need, sleep, he captures  his subjects with intimacy. His motivation to "photograph people while they are unaware of the camera and to remove the politics of the pose from my images" results in stark images never seen before. One interesting quote he makes is that after "Over 350 images later I still find myself compelled to document this phenomena of urbanization in the 21st century where space has become so scarce in a city like Mumbai that 'private' acts are often conducted in public. Mumbai Sleeping is a testament to the strength and human spirit of the lower class urban population that drive the wheel of the city by day and sleep on it at night - forcing us to question whether a good night’s sleep is a luxury or a necessity." I think this statement says much about the motivations of the modern world and how we view "necessities when faced with few options.

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Art and the Internet of Things: a turning point in creative education

Art and the Internet of Things: a turning point in creative education | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
What is the value of art in a society where networked devices control our lives? This year's art graduates offer some clues

Via jean lievens
Debbie Lynch's insight:

This article is about the role of the internet on art as we move into the future. The focus is on the value of art in society. It compares making art for ones personal satisfaction versus public consumption. The author a member of The Internet Council of Things examines STEM and what is currently considered to be of value in public schools. The author himself an member of he Internet of Things which is "is an umbrella term used to describe a next step in the evolution of the internet: to augmented "smart" objects, accessible to human beings and each other over network connections."It further explores the dominance of devices  in society today. I like one of his closing statements, " Art, after all, is a material means of thinking about the world around us.." In my opinion this is the voice and value of Art.

 

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alicia bagley's curator insight, January 6, 2015 12:40 PM

Creativity is not limited to pencil and paper or paint and a canvas. Creativity and technology have a place together in today's society. This article examines how a professor combines technology with art to create meaning.

Sara Conway Gurney's curator insight, January 10, 2015 5:57 PM

McKeown, J.(May, 5, 2014). Art and the Internet of Things:  A Turning Point in Creative Education. www.theguardian.com

 

McKeown's article highlights the inherent issues in the validity of our programs. McKeown (2014) offers, "What makes art valuable is its ability to apprehend the conditions of our lives and articulate them in such a manner that they become tangible as propositions and questions." Intruiging observations on our current predicament of art, technology and globalization.

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5 Reasons to Use Gamification in E-Learning | Origin Learning | A Learning Solutions Blog

5 Reasons to Use Gamification in E-Learning | Origin Learning | A Learning Solutions Blog | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it

From a very tender age, we are exposed to games: Chess, Monopoly, Scotland Yard… And that is for a reason, because games make learning not seem like ‘learning’. Our mind inputs far more concentration and participation in a game rather than something we are otherwise taught.

 

As we grow up, such informal learning is replaced with a more structured, more formal way of instruction – the effectiveness of which has been questioned time and again.

 

Thankfully, with the introduction of high-end gamification in learning, we now have back what was lost being a child – a powerful medium of learning in the adult, corporate world.

 

Interactive games that resemble real work roles or use simulation to immerse the learner in a life like environment have a number of advantages to the organization:

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Debbie Lynch's insight:

An interesting approach to connecting games and learning. I'm not quite sure if I agree with it but it definitely incorporates technology into learning. Just another example of the never ending influence technology has on learning and cognitive development.

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media causing eating disorders - YouTube


Via Talmadge Hutto
Debbie Lynch's insight:

This video focuses on the impact some sites and the media can have on children and young adults developing an eating disorder. The media and YouTube over emphasize the attractiveness of being dangerously thin.  This video is an effective method of educating the dangers of eating disorders.

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Talmadge Hutto's curator insight, July 8, 2014 12:53 PM

Media Causing Eating Disorders." YouTube. N.p., n.d. Web. 08 July 2014

 

This is a YouTube video illustrating the role of the media in eating disorders.  Young people are influenced by the advertisements depicting the overly thin models.  This is what is popular or trendy.  Young girls begin to believe it is the only way to be beautiful and accepted in society.  This video displays images of the mind processes of people with eating disorders.  It also displays how frighteningly thin some of them become.  This video demonstrates exactly what young people are looking at when they begin to develop eating disorders.  It also shows how many of these girls take it too far.  The point of the video is strong and clear. This video would be a good tool in reaching out to young people suffering from these eating disorders.

mor shwartz's curator insight, November 25, 2016 4:13 AM
סרטון המראה שהשפעת המדיה היא שגורמת להפרעות אכילה ועל הצופים ,  ולהבין שמודל הגוף המראים שם הוא לא המציאות 
ואין גוף מושלם
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Social Media Anxiety Disorder (SMAD): The Next New Medical Condition?

Social Media Anxiety Disorder (SMAD): The Next New Medical Condition? | Bullying Intervention | Scoop.it
Could Social Media Anxiety Disorder (or Social Media Anxiety Syndrome) be the next illness we create?

Via Talmadge Hutto
Debbie Lynch's insight:

Social media can definitely impact how kids think and feel about themselves, contributing to this epidemic. this is one of many reasons why parents need to closely monitor their kids internet sites. Many sites out there, are sadly devoted to promoting such behaviors.

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Talmadge Hutto's curator insight, July 9, 2014 12:33 PM

Social Media Anxiety Disorder (SMAD): The Next New Medical Condition?" CommonHealth RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 July 2014

 

This site shows how social media can actually be the cause of psychological disorders other than eating disorders.  This is a blog that one woman wrote about her encounter with anxiety after signing up for a Pinterest.  She implies that people have become too focused on social interactions.  They rely on the opinions of others to base their emotions and actions.  Social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, have been known to cause depression and anxiety for some people.  This may be the next plague in the line of disorders caused by social media.  This blog represents how out-of-control the media has become with influencing the public in a negative way.  This blog sparks ideas on what we have in store for the future if we do not take some sort of action.  It is very interesting and relevant to my topic because it shows the seriousness of the issue.  The author of the blog, Martha Bebinger, graduated from Harvard University and currently maintains a career in healthcare.

Debbie Lynch's curator insight, January 9, 2015 4:38 PM

Kids today are more at risk for developing social and emotional disorders because of the influence of social; media sites. They are at the mercy of multiple peoples opinions, making them vulnerable to criticism. In addition, to a child that lacks the cognitive and emotional abilities to remove themselves from others posts, may in fact develop anxiety and feel depression based on others posts. Some people put out a fantasy world where all is perfect. Children who face challenges in their own lives, such as  divorce, homelessness, parental addictions, etc. may develop negative self opinions when they compare themselves to the "prefect" world of others.