Bullying
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Analyzing Anti-bullying Law

Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

"Preflection": I knew that most states (about 48 of them) in the U.S. had anti-bullying laws and reforms. I also knew that private schools were often left to their own devices to combat bullying. But I also knew that much less bullying is recorded in private schools than in public schools.

 

This article is extremely important because it explains the content of the anti-bullying laws and critically examines some of their impacts and consequences. Simply knowing that anti-bullying laws exist is not an indicator of improving anti-bullying programs. 

 

I would still like to know more about private schools. Is there a study that examines the lack of bully reform in private school?

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An interesting page on Cyber Bully Preventio

An interesting page on Cyber Bully Preventio | Bullying | Scoop.it
Parents and kids can prevent cyberbullying. Find out about safe ways to use technology at StopBullying.gov.
Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

I don't really like much of what is on the "prevent cyberbullying" page; it seems unlikely to me that a parent and child could form that sort of relationship. If a relationship such as the one recommended by this site is truly feasible in certain individual cases, then that's good--but it's unlikely. If a relationship must be formed, I feel that it should be more based upon the child's ability to converse openly with his/her parent, and not on a parent's ability to monitor his/her child's every action.

 

The content on the "report cyberbullying" page seems more pragmatic to me. The interesting part is about schools, because in certain states they are not required to address cyberbullying (and perhaps private schools are exempt from this requirement in all states???).

 

I'd like to look more into which states have certain bullying laws, especially those laws that apply to schools. What are the arguments around what a school's role is in bullying prevention? What is the family's role--should the family be told how to address bullying?

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Facts and Figures in an observation of classroom bullyin

Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

It's fairly clear that bullying occurs as a result of variety of social and statistical factors. Learning exactly what these factors are, by looking at data, helps people target what factors of the issue ought to be addressed most aggressively.

 

This article provides the reader with a number of facts that in many cases may not be useful. However, a few are. For example, its insight into the structure of institutions in which bullying occurs suggests that there may be ways to combat bullying by altering those structures.

 

The next thing to do is find an article that proposes some methods to fight bullying, and compare what it says to some of the information supplied in this article. Through contrasting specific findings and theoretical plans, perhaps I could arrive at some interesting conclusions of my own--that is, I could better nurture my own perspective.

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Eccentric Article on Medical Blacklisting

Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

I don't much care for this article...it sounds conspiratorial. Nevertheless, I think the idea is interesting, and if I can trust this article, then it seems that medical blacklisting constitutes a form of bullying. I'm sure there are multiple equivalents in other fields.


I'm not sure that I've heard much about this much before. I think, perhaps incidentally, I've overheard conversations about it, but I wasn't aware of it as an issue.

 

I'd like to see if there's some more literature on this subject, because most of what I see seems to be written by incensed patients. I might also like to look at how something like this manifests in other professions.

 

 

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Alienation and "bullying" in larger societies

Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

The interesting thing about this article is it doesn't dwell much on the traditional notion of bullying. Rather, it seeks to point out, explain, and propose solutions to the broader idea of social exclusion. Social exclusion (in the non-institutional, more social sense) can be caused by bullying because of an individual or group of individual's characteristics that the bully views unfavorably.

 

The difficult thing about this subject is parsing out the bullying from the discrimination. Aren't bullying and discrimination built on the same idea?

 

I especially like this paper because it draws connections between a form of bullying and social inequality. It also seems to be looking at bullying on a societal level rather than an individual one, which is unique.

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Bullying in Private Schools

Bullying in Private Schools | Bullying | Scoop.it
Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

This article addresses the question of a private school's relationship to bullying. Apparently, many states have worked hard to try and subdue bullying in public schools, but private schools are largely left "on their own" as far as reforms go. The article claims that private schools do pretty well though, even despite the lack of government intervention.

 

Some of the comments are unreadable, but at least one of them seems to disagree with the article. Written by a parent, it claims that some private schools still do too little to combat bullying, probably because of their immunity to certain bullying laws.

 

Based on my understanding of the parent's comment, it's seems that this article painted private schools with a broad brush; not all of them successfully deal with bullying. I have heard such comments before, but only in conversation. Thus, I would like to see if there is a way to quantify the successes and failures of private schools' anti-bullying endeavors.

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The No Bully System Stops Bullying | No Bully

The No Bully System Stops Bullying | No Bully | Bullying | Scoop.it
The No Bully System is a step-by-step process and set of interventions to prevent and stop bullying in your school.
Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

A Specific Bully Program

 

One nice thing about this program's strategy is it has an organized approach that seems to be effective. Furthermore, it works in coordination with government reforms.

 

The issue--I don't see how this program fits in with private schools or other schools that may not be subject to the anti-bullying laws. It also doesn't specifically address cyber bullying. This is a big issue, because cyber bullying can go unnoticed simply because (although it might involve two or more students from the same school) the interactions can occur off-campus.

 

What programs work more specifically with cyber bullying? Is it outside of a school's responsibility to deal with cyber bullying? What can be done about private schools?

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Part of an answer to "Why Prevent Bullying?

Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

Through intuition, I am aware that bullying may negatively influence someone's future, just as the smallest of events sometimes do. There is also the moral issue with bullying--the simple idea that it is  unjust to inflict suffering upon someone. Should anyone question these motives for preventing bullying, this article provides part of a more scientific basis for bullying's "cons".

 

This article reports on a scientific study that showed a connection between bullying and depression/heart disease and a variety of other associated issues. It isn't really groundbreaking, but it does concretely spell out the possible negative impacts of bullying on individuals and suggests that greater society suffers from the issue as well.

 

I would like to see if any other studies find more correlations between bullying and the various other problems that plague our world. I think there might be a number of them. 

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Social Undermining: Insults, Criticisms, and Put Downs

Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

Well, the title I made does not really reflect all forms of social undermining (at least I don't think so. I'm still wondering if social undermining can be at all positive...like constructive criticism).  The bullying part of social undermining seems to be this: directing criticisms at an individual so as to discourage that person and psychologically debilitate them. 

 

I guess that last part I wrote really makes me cringe. I guess it's not fundementally different from most forms of bullying...or is it? It seems that bullying sometimes makes the bully feel more elevated and thus more contented, but how could social undermining be the same way?

 

I think I'd like to look more at this social undermining thing. I do wonder if it can ever be positive. According to the paper, it says it can have some psychological benefits...but what form does the undermining have to be in in order for that to happen? Can it take more than one form and still be positive? 

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Interesting Bully Graphic

Interesting Bully Graphic | Bullying | Scoop.it
Ted Olney-Bell's insight:

There have been numerous famous suicides that have depended on cyberbullying, so I am well aware of its existence. I also know several people who have been subject to it and am therefore aware of the pain it can cause. I always thought it was especially interesting that cyberbullying is so extremely painful, often because it is public and often involves damaging someone's reputation.

 

Well, I'd like to know more about the various motivations there are for bullies (there must be a number of them). Also, how are bullies affected by their actions?

 

This presents some useful statistical information, but it also speaks to the ramifications of bullying (cyberbullying, specifically). While bullying has always been a natural phenomenon and therefore has existed forever, the graphic stresses technology's role in making bullying much more of a relevent issue. The idea that bullying online is "easier" than it is in person is intriguing too.

 

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