Bullying and Education Psychology
395 views | +0 today
Follow
Bullying and Education Psychology
Bullying Behaviors in Relation to Educational Psychology
Curated by Desiree Anne
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

What is bullying? What does it have to do with educational psychology?

What is bullying? What does it have to do with educational psychology? | Bullying and Education Psychology | Scoop.it

“Bullying can be defined as repeated aggressive behavior within a relationship characterized by a real or perceived imbalance of power, in which the student exposed to the aggressive actions cannot adequately defend him/herself” (Olweus 1999). Another way to describe it is a “Repeated aggression towards another person who is perceived as weaker and less able to defend himself or herself from the aggressor” (Olweus 1991).

 

Bullying has a connection to educational psychology because a lot of bullying takes place right in schools. It is extremely important for educators to be aware of the problem, to know what some possible causes might be, and to know some possible solutions to fix it.

more...
yamileth garcia castañeda's curator insight, January 13, 2014 8:06 PM

Tema relacionado con psicología y educación

Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

How effective are anti-bullying programs in schools?

How effective are anti-bullying programs in schools? | Bullying and Education Psychology | Scoop.it

Results from the Friendly Schools intervention program were found to only partiallly support the original hypothesis the researchers had: “Grade 4 students (8-9 years old) from schools that received the Friendly Schools bullying reduction intervention program over a two-year period will be bullied less, will bully others less often, will report the bullying more often if they were bullied, and will observe less bullying of other in the school compared to student who do not receive the intervention” (Cross et al., 2011). Students who received the intervention were less likely to observe bulling throughout the process and were also more likely to tell if they were bullied after twelve months when compared to those students that did not receive the intervention program. There were no differences found when it came to the self-reporting of perpetration of bullying (Cross et al., 2011).

 

The study done by Ttofi et al. (2011) concluded that intervention for high-risk youth (school bullies in particular) is vital and that bullying prevention programs are not only effective, but are financially justified as well. There is a high benefit for having an effective anti-bullying program in place and that is the cost ratio. The long-term effects of a criminal career can and do include costs such as health, welfare, education, and custody. It is recommended in this study that more effort should be made to implement programs that involve individual bullies and victims. They also suggest that family-based programs would be a useful strategy to take to break the cycle of aggression and bullying (Ttofi et al., 2011).

 

Results from another study of the KiVa anti-bullying program found that anti-bullying programs have the potential to be very effective. First off, one of the main ideas of this program that bullying is a strategy for the bully to gain a powerful position within a group. Therefore, the KiVa program believes that by promoting the idea that bystanders of bullying should get involved and defend the victims, and thus take the power away from the bullies (Karna et al., 2011).

 

The results of this study found that during the first 9 months of implementation, the KiVa program reduced both victimization and bullying, with 95% confidence intervals in both areas. In relation specifically to the Finnish population of students, the researchers estimated that during the first 9 months, this program reduced approximately 7,500 bullies and 12,500 victims. Although the results of this study are generalized just to the Finland, it definitely shows that anti-bullying programs can be effective, and have a strong possibility of being effective in other countries besides Finland (Karna et al., 2011).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

Parents want more action on bullying - DesMoinesRegister.com

Parents want more action on bullying - DesMoinesRegister.com | Bullying and Education Psychology | Scoop.it

"Parents want more action on bullying. Sandy Freeman joined a growing chorus of Iowans on Monday asking schools, communities, and lawmakers to do a better job of protecting children from bullying."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

Movie shows what bullying victims endure - Sioux Falls Argus Leader

Movie shows what bullying victims endure - Sioux Falls Argus Leader | Bullying and Education Psychology | Scoop.it

"Movie shows what bullying victims endure. More than 13 million kids will be bullied this year, according to some estimates. Some suffer in silence, facing the daily torment of physical, verbal and emotional abuse."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

THE BOTTOM LINE

THE BOTTOM LINE | Bullying and Education Psychology | Scoop.it

To put it simply, bullying is wrong. It can be hurtful in many ways (physically, mentally, emotionally, etc.) and can cause many long term psychological effects. There is no reason why any person deserves to go through the experience of being bullied.

 

Educators, students, and parents must all work together to end bullying once and for all. Educators should implement anti-bullying programs in schools. Students should defend their peers if they are being bullied, or tell an adult and ask for the help with the situation. Parents should talk to their kids about how bullying is wrong, and encourage them to treat everyone equally, and to ask their peers to do the same. The more kids who think bullying is not cool, the more other kids will be influenced to feel the same way.

 

Bottom line- Bullying needs to end!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

Research Questions

1) What are the psychological impacts of bullying?

 

2) Are certain types of people more prone to being bullied than others?

 

3) How effective are anti-bullying programs in schools?

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

Are certain types of people more prone to being bullied than others?

Are certain types of people more prone to being bullied than others? | Bullying and Education Psychology | Scoop.it

Results from the Personal Experience Checklist (PECK), a multidimensional assessment of a young person’s personal experiences with being bullied, found that there was a “significant difference” in the number of times children from minority ethnic groups that reported being bullied compared to the predominant Anglo-Saxon ethnicity (Hunt et al., 2012).

 

Another study that looked at homophobic victimization among adolescents found that students who identify with being part of the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered, queer) community stand a much higher risk of being bullied than heterosexuals. This is not to discount that heterosexuals do get bullied, but this study found that LGBTQ’s have a significant disadvantage right from the start based on their sexuality (Poteat et al., 2011).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

What are the psychological impacts of bullying?

What are the psychological impacts of bullying? | Bullying and Education Psychology | Scoop.it

A longitudinal study that looked at children’s experiences with being bullied and/or bullying others from age 4 to age 11 found that involvement in bullying in any way is significantly associated with suicide ideation and suicidal/self injurious behavior. Therefore, victims of bullying as well as the bullies themselves are at a heightened risk of having thoughts of suicide, actually committing suicide, and/or injuring themselves in other ways (Winsper et al., 2012).

 

A study done on homophobic bullying/victimization found that it can have serious psychological impacts on the victims, causing them to feel out of place at school and like they don’t belong there. The study also found that many victims of homophobic bullying reported getting lower grades, being truant from school more often, and in general not placing as much importance on graduating as compared to other students who were not bullied (Poteat et al., 2011).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Desiree Anne
Scoop.it!

References

1. Cross, D., Monks, H., Hall, M., Shaw, T., Pintabona, Y., Erceg, E., … Lester, L. (2011). Three-year results of the Friendly Schools whole-of-school intervention on children’s bullying behaviour. British Educational Research Journal 37(1), 105-129.

 

2. Hunt, C., Peters, L., & Rapee, R. (2012). Development of a measure of the experience of being bullied in youth. Psychological Assessment, 24(1), 156-65.

 

3. Karna, A., Voeten, M., Little, T., Poskiparta, E., Alanen, E., Salmivalli, C. (2011). Going to scale: A nonrandomized nationwide trial of the KiVa anti-bullying program for
grades 1-9. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79(6), 796-805.

 

4. Poteat, V., Mereish, E., DiGiovanni, C., & Koenig, B. (2011). The effects of general and homophobic victimization on adolescents’ psychological and educational concerns: The importance of intersecting and parent support. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 58(4), 597-609

 

5. Ttofi, M.M., Farrington, D.P., Losel, F., & Loeber, R. (2011). The predictive efficiency of school bullying versus later offending: A systematic/meta-analytic review of longitudinal studies. Criminal Bahaviour and Mental Health, 21, 80-89.

 

6. Winsper, C., Lereya, T., Zanarini, M., & Wolke, Dieter. (2012). Involvement in bullying and suicide-related behavior at 11 years: A prospective birth cohort study. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 51(3), 271-82.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.