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The Post 2012 Village
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Bugarach surveillé

Bugarach surveillé | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Visiblement, l'activité internet qui tourne autour de Bugarach est strictement surveillée. En témoigne l'anecdote que nous a racontée un Carcassonnais, qui a tenté de mettre en ligne une annonce factice sur le site Priceminister.

 

Dans la rubrique "insolite", il proposait de vendre de véritables pierres récoltées sur le pic désormais mythique. Quelques instants plus tard, il recevait un mail lui signifiant que son texte allait être mis en ligne. Puis, presque immédiatement, un autre mail lui annonçant que son annonce avait été "refusée". La vigilance qui avait été annoncée par les services de l'État autour du phénomène Bugarach semble bien fonctionner.

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A Happy (Mayan) New Year One and All « French News Online ...

A Happy (Mayan) New Year One and All « French News Online ... | Bugarach | Scoop.it
As the New Year dawns, the forces of the Mayan “apocalypse” gather in Cathar country, New-Agers set-up shop in Toulouse — ironically France’s aerospace capital — and end-of-the-worlders prepare … but a Guatemalan may have spiked their guns.

 

For more than two Christmases stories have poured out of the global media and thousands of Internet forums, suggesting that the rocky Bugarach peak in the Corbières Mountains, will be the only safe place on earth when, reportedly, and according to the Mayan calendar, the world ends on 21 December 2012.

But now a Guatemalan-born Mayan ‘expert ‘ has surfaced to drive a stake through the heart of what is fast becoming a lucrative millennium myth … and the cause of some concern to the 189 residents of this peaceful farming village nestling at the foot of the Pic de Bugarach in south-western Aude region, that has never before been so much in the global spotlight.

Indeed, says one report, virtually everyone in the village, from local goatherd, to a one-man estate agency, has been quoted endlessly, vacuously and seemingly incessantly in media as far apart as Washington, Tokyo, Helsinki, Toronto, and Johannesburg, since the story about what locals call the zozotériques first hit the headlines.

(...)

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Mt Bugarach South West France UFO Base

Mt Bugarach South West France UFO Base | Bugarach | Scoop.it

I would like to know your opinion on this subject it has been said that it is the only place that will survive in December 2012. It has been said that in December 2012 the mountain will open and a space ship which has been buried for thousands of years will come out to save the planet. There has always been a lot of UFO activity in this area and a lot of organisations have been investigating here from the French secret service the Vatican and even the Mossad makes you wonder if they know something we dont. I live a few KMs away from Bugarach I have seen a UFO whilst staying the night on the mountain Not to mention the 15 or more UFOs I have seen in 2011 , 3 captured on film by accident whilst I was filming a French military plane flying over my house. There is something very special about this area there has been sightings in the 1970s of a ufo stationary in a village about 100 metres off the ground and about 300 metres in length .

Another one landed about a 1Km from the first sighting this one landed and left a visible mark on the ground that stayed for over for over 20 years .

If anyone else has more information on this subject please let me know...............

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The 2012 phenomenon - Times of India

The 2012 phenomenon - Times of India | Bugarach | Scoop.it
By now, everyone has argued and debated over the world coming to an end in 2012 according to the Mayan calendar.

There are many other theories. We are not saying we believe them. But it is sure interesting to know what's out there. Read on if you are intrigued...

Mera gaon...: In 2000, the small French village of Bugarach, (population of 189) began receiving visits from esoterics who reason that the local mountain, Pic de Bugarach, is the ideal location to weather the transformative events of 2012. The local mayor, voiced fears to the international press that the small town would be overwhelmed by an influx of thousands of visitors in 2012, even suggesting he may call in the army.

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Magic of Bugarach

Bugarach is a sacred village at the foot of the Pyrennees, and it is overlooked by a special mountain that people from all over the world come to see...

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What Mayan calendar, Ramtha and French Village Bugarach Have In Common?

What Mayan calendar, Ramtha and French Village Bugarach Have In Common? | Bugarach | Scoop.it

via ca.news.yahoo.com : The End Of The World Apparently

 

The tiny southern French hamlet of Bugarach has drawn scrutiny from a government sect watchdog over droves of visitors who believe it is the only place in the world that will survive a 2012 Apocalypse ...

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Bugarach, village pris d'assaut pour échapper à l'Apocalypse

Bugarach, village pris d'assaut pour échapper à l'Apocalypse | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Bugarach, village pris d'assaut pour échapper à l'Apocalypse - toute l'actualité est sur BFMTV.com...
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BUGARACH - "PIC BUG WELCOME"

Bande annonce du "Pic Bug Welcome" Un Voyage Initiatique.

 

Un film de fiction de Malgorzata Debowska.
Dans le sud de la France.
La Montagne BUGARACH et ses grottes.
Sortie DVD en Janvier 2012 sur :

 http://www.debowska.fr 

 

 

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Flash-Game.com Presents Bugarach 2012

Flash-Game.com Presents Bugarach 2012 | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Defend Earth from alien invaders in the town of Bugarach in 2012! For freedom! Unite Earthlings, and stand up to these foreign creatures, before it is too late!
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Bugarach located in Bugarach, France

Bugarach located in Bugarach, France | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Small French town or alien garage?

In December 2012, a legion of apocalyptic New Age believers will either join the ranks of aliens, or feel very stupid. For the time being though, they're content just to occupy the small, wine-country village of Bugarach, France and wait for the end of the world.

 

According to believers from across the globe, the village of Bugarach is the only location in the world that will be spared during the Mayan-predicted apocalypse of 2012. Despite scientists asserting with a high level of confidence that the Mayan calendar simply starts over, the New Age followers who have flocked to the town insist that aliens living beneath the mountain near Bugarach will save them when the world ends.

 

With a steady stream of almost 20,000 visitors per year, alien-scientists and fanatics alike have come to the foot of the mountain, or alien garage as they like to call it, to pray, learn and engage in bizarre ritual. Overrunning natives of Bugarach, the real estate market in the area has even increased in value as many alien-followers have purchased homes and cottages in the area.

 

Over the last 1000 years, a number of sources have stated that caves below the mountain existed. However, there is little hard evidence that aliens reside in these caves, and the New Age following around the town is beginning to concern locals. The mayor of the town even issued a statement saying he would not hesitate to involve the army if things in Bugarach got out of hand. A French group has also placed the town under watch, suspecting that mass suicides might take place before the predicted apocalypse....

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Aude, Aude, Aude

Aude, Aude, Aude | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Que va-t-il se passer aujourd'hui 11 novembre 2011, autrement dit le 11/11/11 ? Les superstitieux de tous poils et autres paranoïaques à l'esprit encombré de symboles secrets vont être dans leurs petits souliers.

Cette suite de nombres va-t-elle provoquer une catastrophe, porter chance ou, plus certainement, être un jour comme les autres ? Sur Internet, les avis divergent.

 

Perturbés, les chantres de la Méthode Holistique préviennent : « Le 11 novembre 2011 à 11h11 GMT, nous nous rassemblerons en un seul cœur, une seule âme, une seule pensée profondément aimante... »

http://methodeholistique.over-blog.com/article-le-11-novembre-2011-a-11-11-tmg-79233666.html 

 

Comique, le programme de Florian Gazan, animateur radio qui annonce via Twitter : « Le 11-11-11 à 11h11 et 11 secondes, j'ai prévu de lire 11% de la page 11 du magazine Onze. Histoire de voir ce qu'il va se passer... »

https://twitter.com/#!/search/11-11-11 

 

Opportuniste, la loterie espagnole, la Once, a lancé une loterie avec… 11 millions d'euros à la clé pour le ticket gagnant.

http://www.once.es/new/sala-de-prensa/notas-de-prensa/la-once-celebra-el-11.11.11-con-un-201csorteo 

 

Pas concernés, les Musulmans sont en l'an 1432, les Chinois dans le cycle 78 de l'année du Lapin et les Égyptiens le 25 phamenoth 2760.

http://www.ephemeride.com/calendrier/autrescalendriers/21/?day=11&month=10&year=2011 

 

Partout des signes, des symboles, des prédictions mais nulle part l'évidence : le 11, c'est aussi le département de l'Aude.

Et personne pour faire un lien avec Bugarach et Rennes-le-Château !

Et si le 11/11/11 à 11 h 11 seuls les Audois s'en tiraient ? Je ne suis pas spécialement crédule, mais ce vendredi étant férié, je vais en profiter pour aller revoir quelques amis carcassonnais et chauriens. On ne sait jamais...

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The Magic Mountain

The Magic Mountain | Bugarach | Scoop.it

A mountain near Rennes-le-Château is becoming a focal point for unwanted 2012 hype. But the true mysteries and enigmas of Bugarach are fare more interesting, with a real-life Indiana Jones character who dug for the Ark of the Covenant!

 

On December 21, 2010, the English newspaper “The Daily Telegraph” drew attention to the tiny French village of Bugarach, population 200, and the saga of the end of the Mayan calendar which will occur on December 21, 2012.

http://bit.ly/tLs8rb 

The mayor of Bugarach, Jean-Pierre Delord, announced that his tiny village was becoming a refuge for “esoterics” who believed that the village played an important role in the 2012 scenario, maybe as a place of salvation, or where the apocalypse might be played out, where alien beings might intervene or even rescue those present. He and the locals were unhappy with this development, which was upsetting the villagers’ tranquillity. As France has a sad past of cults committing mass suicide, Delord felt people should hear his warning that these “esoterics” might do something similar in the near future.

Bugarach is indeed a tiny village, sitting in the shadow of the “Pic de Bugarach”, rising 1230 metres above sea-level and the highest mountain in the Corbières region – though dwarfed by the Pyrenees that rise to the south. The earliest recorded mention of the mountain was as Burgaragio in 889 AD, which is also known as Pech de Thauze. From a geological perspective, Bugarach is an oddity, an “upside down mountain”, as its tops layers are millions of years older than the lower strata. It is as if someone shot the mountain in the air, flipped it around, and then it landed again.
Today, the village that sits on its slopes is somewhat quaint – the French school system has statistics which reveal that the suicide rate amongst teachers in the village is the highest in France! – and on a rainy day, Bugarach does exude an energy that can be hard to take. However, when the sun is out, it is lovely and the castle that is almost collapsing and the multi-coloured church make it apparent that this village has existed for hundreds of years.
The mountain has always inspired the imagination of so many, including the French father of science fiction, Jules Verne. The mountain is made of limestone, which means it has several caves and galleries, which are rife with local legends and also provide the perfect backdrop to let one’s imagination veer off. And that is what has happened, on numerous occasions. If you leave the local folklore behind and go on the Internet, as “The Daily Telegraph” reported, it “abounds with tales of the late President François Mitterrand being curiously heliported onto the peak, of mysterious digs conducted by the Nazis and later Mossad, the Israeli secret services. There is talk of the area, near to the Cathar castles, holding the Holy Grail or the treasure of the Templars. A visit to Bugarach is said to have inspired Steven Spielberg in his film, Close Encounters of the Third Kind.” The locals will indeed confirm that they believe strongly that Spielberg in his search for an enigmatic mountain to host the finale of his movie considered Bugarach as a film location, but in the end opted for Devil’s Tower in Wyoming. His choice might seem quite logical, knowing that many locals report many enigmatic UFO sightings around the mountain – though few of these have been properly investigated.

 

The story of Bugarach and 2012 was picked up and expanded by “The New York Times” in their January 31, 2011 edition, making it a story that brought it to the attention of the world’s media.

http://bit.ly/vUZPlg 

But despite Bugarach’s recent somewhat-fame, it will no doubt always play second fiddle to the nearby village of Rennes-le-Château, which went on to inspire so many, including the likes of Dan Brown, who wrote “The Da Vinci Code”. Indeed, the man who put Rennes-le-Château on the map, Noël Corbu, lived in Bugarach when he learned of the estate of the enigmatic priest Bérenger Saunière. He sold his home in Bugarach and moved his family to the nearby village, where he began to promote the mystery of the “billion dollar priest”.
For Franck Marie, an “esoteric” writer who has lived in the region for many years, Bugarach has a “natural cave system which without a doubt was occupied by our earliest ancestors, in the Magdalene Era”. He also proposes that there was a link between the mystery of Saunière and Bugarach, seeing it as a “spiritual treasure” that was linked with “primitive Mankind” – some type of esoteric knowledge that has been passed down over time. Marie believes that the site was placed under the protection of certain initiates that kept part of the cave system secret.
Bugarach has therefore definitely deserved the distinction of being a mystery location in its own right. It had been called “the sacred mountain” – though few know why – before Saunière ever set foot in Rennes-le-Château in 1885. It not only inspired Spielberg, but also Jules Verne, who created a character “Captain Bugarach” for his “Clovis Dardentor” (1896).
Michel Lamy is the author of a book on Jules Verne, in which he explores the possibility that one of the founding fathers of science fiction was aware of certain esoteric knowledge about the mountain that he worked into his novels. Specifically, that Verne wrote about Bugarach in relationship with the existence of an underground – lost – civilisation. But even Lamy is at a loss to explain why Verne would have become so enchanted with Bugarach – unless, of course, he was fully aware of the local legends, which he merely transcribed into his novels, or maybe he was even one of those initiates and protectors of the “sacred mountain”?

 

But whereas there might be people who protect the enigma of Bugarach – for no-one really knows why it has been labelled a sacred mountain for centuries – there is the enigmatic story of a man who came to Bugarach to uncover its secrets, meeting his death while doing so.
Both on the internet and locally, wild variations of the story circulate. Here is the truth. Daniel Bettex was a Swiss citizen who was a security officer at Geneva airport. Bettex frequented the south of France on his holidays and was enchanted by its beauty. Eventually, he contacted the local Cathar organisation that had been founded by Déodat Roché, the mayor of nearby Arques, and which tried to research and promote Catharism, the religion destroyed by Church during the so-called Albigensian Crusade of the 13th century. In his correspondence with the organisation, he enquired about places where he could help them with research. He desired remote locations, so that he was left undisturbed. Roché thus advised him to study the sector of Bugarach, which had been little prospected by other members of his organisation, even though it was known that the Cathars were familiar with the village. To this end, Roché also recommended to Bettex that he contacted Lucienne Julien, the then secretary of the organisation, and use her as his liaison with the organisation. The latter thus maintained a close correspondence with Bettex, as he progressed in his Bugarach research.
Over the ensuing years, Bettex leafed through files while he was in Switzerland, and when he descended to the South of France during his summer vacations, he explored and dug. He also studied the old registers that existed, which had details of mining activities and which contained information on the underground network that existed in this limestone environment – and learned how much – or how little – had been explored.
Bettex also uncovered a work on the mythology of the mountain, written by a university student during the Second World War. The author had been called up for military service and his fate seems to have been unknown. The thesis referenced several legends and myths, with some of the legends going back as early as the 15th century. It was clear that Verne was not the first to invent a mythology about this mountain – that was many centuries older.
Of course, such a compendium is not an archaeological report. But the stories did show a superposition between various myths and locations around the mountain… locations that people, for generations, were linking with an entrance to a mythical underground world. Bettex wondered whether he could be the one who would locate the entrance and finally reveal its existence. Would he prove that Verne was not a science fiction writer, but had written a factual account – was there an entrance to the Centre of the Earth?

 

Bettex was able to find one of the entrances listed in the account, but found it was blocked. He re-opened it, to find that it led to a peaceful underground river, which was deep, but possible to navigate. He also found that there was a type of quay or landing, in an L-shape, which suggested that this was not the result of a geological event, but was manmade – purposefully built. But by whom, when and for what? Those were questions he could not answer.
He had taken photographs of this and other voyages in the belly of the mountain, as he explored its known and less known and sometimes even forgotten caves. He showed them to Julien, who reported that there were several stone structures inside the underground cave system, proving they were once inhabited. But it proved little else.
Bettex had also entered the local derelict castle. He spent a great amount of time in the basement of the castle, work he carried out with the full knowledge and participation of the owner and the relevant authorities, even though in those days, there was far less paperwork to cope with. There, he found several stones with graffiti, some of which was clearly in the shape of a container and a stretcher, a scene suggestive of the Ark of the Covenant being carried on a stretcher. Could the graffiti mean that the mountain was the resting place of the Ark?
A rumour circulates all the quicker if it is known as a secret. Thus, one statement went that Bettex was searching for the Ark of the Covenant, that he had now located it, as evidenced by his photographs and the graffiti: it was under Bugarach! A related rumour ran that General Moshe Dayan, the head of the Israeli intelligence agency Mossad, had become personally interested in Bettex’s research. With such notorious Israel officials now apparently interested in him, Bettex’s local profile went up with several points… and the rumour of the Ark of the Covenant underneath Bugarach became more and better known. One rumour had it that Moshe Dayan contacted Bettex personally, warning him, advising him, to stop everything if he discovered the artefact and especially not to touch anything. Bettex must surely have been familiar with his Bible, which clearly spells out the dangers of touching the Ark.

Daniel Bettex took a long time to decide where precisely he would carry out his major excavation. Once he had done so, he made sure that he could work in all solitude, undisturbed by tourists or locals who became more and more interested in him. But throughout, he kept Lucienne Julien informed of his progress; she meticulously retained all correspondence.
This private correspondence makes it clear that he was looking for an old cavity, whose entrance had become lost and which was located in the side of the mountain. After his death, rumours had it that his investigations had involved a filled-in mine, whereas others spoke of a low cave. In truth, no-one knows for sure – or where precisely it is located. Some even believe there was a secondary access to this system from inside the basement of the castle! He did indicate to Julien that he thought that there was a connection between the inexplicable graffiti, the remains of a hearth inside the castle and the entrance of a mining installation whose collapse had been intentional – but the mine seemed to have been outside of the village.

 

In 1988, everything accelerated. He told Julien that it would take him a few more months of work, but that his research had also made it clear that it would lead to a fabulous deposit, exceeding anything that she or anyone could imagine… it would be an amazing revelation. Bettex was normally calm and methodical, true to the Swiss stereotype, but now he was excited if not manic. He next visited Julien, to tell her that he was almost at the end of his research. At most, four or five days separated him from reaching his final goal. He told her that within the week he would be back, carrying with him part of the treasure. “You will be immensely rich!” But instead, three days later, Julien learned that Bettex had been found dead in Bugarach.
There were – as could be expected – various versions of his death and its cause. For some, a cave had collapsed, causing severe injuries and ultimately his death. Others believed that he had left Switzerland with serious cardiovascular problems, which resulted in his death once he laboured in the South of France. Other rumours had it that he was stricken on the spot – instantaneous death by whatever. Some even said that his body had inexplicably dehydrated, either as the cause of death, or afterwards. Others argue he was able to walk to one of the gardens of the first houses of Bugarach, where he collapsed, apparently the victim of a violent heart attack. So many things have been and are being said about the death of Bettex, but we only truly know that he died, in mysterious circumstances, according to his own testimony very close to finding his lifetime’s ambition. If he did find something, he took the secret with him.

Bettex’s death definitely triggered a reaction from the authorities. Lucienne Julien planned, several months after Bettex’s death, to continue his work on site, using members of her Cathar research organisation. She informed the Ministry of Culture of her intentions, as Bettex before had informed them of his. She had to resend her application several times, before she received a reply, which stated that it was out of the question that such research was to be carried out. She would afterwards learn that rubble and concrete had been cast inside the basement of the castle, in order to block any possible cavity forever. Another location in the village was subjected to a similar fate. But as the cement settled, the question rose whether Bettex only found death, or something else in Bugarach. Could an accidental death have such repercussions that the authorities decided to concrete the place over? France has never been the Mecca of health and safety regulations, and the circumstances of Bettex’s death were nebulous enough not to imply that the precarious state of the castle had caused his death.
More than two decades on, little about Bettex’s death and his quest is known. He has become one in a long line of seekers who went in search of, but did not find the answer as to whether there is a real reason why Bugarach is called the “sacred mountain”. What we do know, is that as 2012 approaches, another layer of mystery is piled on top of this Magic Mountain. Maybe this renewed attention, will finally bring about sufficient interest and insight into its past…

 

 

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Envoye special- 2012 apocalypse - 01-12-2011

Émission Envoyé Spécial, partie consacrée aux prophètes de l'Apocalypse. 21 décembre 2012.
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Enquête exclusive Ils ont peur de 2012 Bugarach 11/12/11

Chapitre Bugarach sur les fêlés du bocal, fou-rire garantie, que du bonheur! Si vous voulez entrer dans le tombeau de Jesus, abonnez vous a la chaine Esobook...
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Challenging French rural eco plumbing freaks out pilgrims to Bugarach apocalypse site funny satire story

Challenging French rural eco plumbing freaks out pilgrims to Bugarach apocalypse site funny satire story | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Aude, France - A camper van convoy heading south to the apocalyptic 2012 town of Bugarach is threatening to sue UK tour operators HippyWheels amid a gruelling three day experience of local extreme plumbing.

Treacherous wintry conditions saw the close-down of all tourist facilities sending 40 Yuletide travellers packed inside five souped-up Airstreams into unchartered rural territory.

The pilgrimage was to have arrived in the Bugarach UFO mothership base on Russian Christmas Day 7 January in preparation for the first of the year's full moon ceremonies.

But it ended up holed up in a dilapidated former campsite just south of Rennes-Les-Bains on the D14.

A fiendish configuration of mountains and dense forestry sees the ancient beauty spot untrammeled by wi-fi, cell phone signals or any form of organised electricity - something that the HippyWheels Winter 2011-12 catalogue failed to point out in its blurb.

Then late this evening a faint signal via a combination of carrier pigeon, morse code, semaphore and G-1 managed to transmit an SOS from stranded travelers to the Pyrenean mountain site.

Their plight chiefly concerns primitive conditions after onboard portaloos all froze up and/or caved in under unrelenting pressure during the stranding.

A diary entry retrieved from traveling tour guide Miss Sky Lotusblossom advises that 'at zero degrees on an ass-freezing January night the (only) open plan outdoor composting lav enjoys a panoramic 360-degree view of surrounding countryside and is the most sophisticated sanitation facility for 30 miles.'

Bugarach has become the epicenter of a worldwide apocalyptic movement claiming special sanctuary for all who shelter within a one mile radius of its extraordinary peak.

Last year its Mayor Jean-Pierre Delord threatened to call in the army if the influx of wacky-baccy Mayan 2012 apocalypse travelers continued to swamp the town's otherwise peaceful life.

Tales of how the late French President François Mitterrand had once been curiously 'heliported' on to the Bugarach outcrop's peak, of some mystery digs conducted by the Nazis and later Mossad have all culminated in creating the world's biggest magnet for Armageddon nutz.

The next scheduled UFO flypast near the Arc de Triomphe is this Friday the 13th of January.

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21 décembre 2012, Bugarach et fin du monde

21 décembre 2012, Bugarach et fin du monde | Bugarach | Scoop.it

Comme prévu par les Mayas, la météo, l’Office français des catastrophes annoncées, les sectes apocalyptiques et millénaristes, plus quelques illuminés… la fin du monde, consécutive à un renversement des pôles, a bel et bien eu lieu, le 21 décembre 2012, ce que notre rédaction réprouve et déplore. Nos très sincères condoléances à tous.

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A un an de l'apocalypse, le pic de Bugarach fait des affaires

A un an de l'apocalypse, le pic de Bugarach fait des affaires | Bugarach | Scoop.it

Une carte postale du pic de Bugarach, et sa soucoupe volante (La-fin-du-monde.fr) 

 

 Rue89 :

 

(De Bugarach, Aude) Bugarach, c'est un pic qui culmine à 1 231 m. Perdu dans la Haute Vallée de l'Aude, il est depuis plus d'un siècle l'objet de tous les fantasmes et croyances surnaturelles.

Ses couches géologiques inversées lui donneraient des pouvoirs extraordinaires liés au magnétisme. Jules Verne s'en serait même inspiré pour écrire son « Voyage au centre de la Terre » (1864). Dans les années 60, à travers les écrits d'un auteur fasciné par l'ésotérisme, Jean d'Argoun, un nouveau mythe naît : le pic abriterait une base extraterrestre.

Mais depuis, une autre histoire, relayée sur Internet, l'a largement supplanté. Selon différentes sources, le pic de Bugarach et le village qui se situe à son pied seraient les seuls lieux sur Terre épargnés par l'apocalypse, une fin du monde qui doit intervenir le 21 décembre 2012, selon le calendrier maya.

Cette prédiction tombée du ciel il y a environ un an a focalisé tous les regards sur le petit village – moins de 200 âmes. Elle a aussi aiguisé l'appétit de certains de ses habitants qui y voient un nouveau filon à exploiter.

Un euro la carte postale avec une soucoupe

« Dans le village-même, l'affluence ne se fait pas trop ressentir », explique le maire de Bugarach, Jean-Pierre Delord.

« Mais sur le pic, elle a plus que doublé en un an. Nous avons installé un compteur là-haut : le nombre de marcheurs est passé de 10 000 à 20 000. »

Qui sont ces marcheurs ? Sait-il s'il existe des groupes sectaires dans la région ? Sur ces questions, l'élu ne semble pas trop regardant :

« Nous sommes en démocratie, ce qui implique une liberté de culte et de croyances. Moi ce qui m'importe, c'est simplement qu'il n'y ait pas d'atteinte à l'ordre public. J'en ai d'ailleurs appelé aux autorités en cas d'éventuel débordement. Si des milliers et des milliers de personnes montent au pic le 21 décembre de l'an prochain, je ne pourrai pas assurer leur sécurité. »

Si cette arrivée massive de visiteurs l'effraie un peu, le maire compte aussi en tirer profit pour sa commune.

« Je suis maire depuis trente-cinq ans et jamais Bugarach n'avait été aussi connu. Nous devons saisir ce moment pour nous faire connaître. »

Et pour bénéficier comme il se doit de cette fin du monde annoncée, rien de tel qu'exploiter directement l'événement.

« Nous vendons des cartes postales à 1 euro qui représentent le pic avec une soucoupe volante au-dessus. Nous les avons signées David Vincent [personnage principale de la série “Les Envahisseurs”, ndlr].

Je réfléchis aussi à créer un festival les années suivantes pour commémorer le 21 décembre. Ce serait un grand festival de l'utopie mais je ne sais pas encore quelle forme il prendrait. »

 

Des devis pour construire des bunkers

Deuxième idée : en profiter pour développer l'économie locale.

« Les gens qui viennent consomment dans les restaurants ou au supermarché pas loin du village. Et puis cette publicité gratuite qui nous est faite pourrait nous permettre de mener à bien notre projet d'extension avec la création d'un éco-quartier. En étant plus connus, on pourrait faire débloquer des financements car le problème ici, comme bien souvent, c'est le fric. »

A Bugarach, certains tentent d'ailleurs d'en gagner un maximum. « En quelques mois, le prix des terrains à vendre est passé de 15 à 50 euros le mètre carré », explique Jean-Pierre Delord.

Les maisons aussi ont soudain vu leur prix exploser. Bernard Cervières travaille depuis dix ans dans le secteur de Bugarach comme agent commercial pour une grande enseigne immobilière. Et depuis que le village est au centre de toutes les attentions, y vendre des biens devient de plus en plus compliqué.

« Les propriétaires ont pensé que des illuminés seraient prêts à mettre n'importe quel prix pour venir échapper à la fin du monde. Or, ceux qui viennent voir les maisons n'ont pas les moyens de les acheter, même quand ils viennent à six ou sept couples pour faire de grandes colocations.

Par exemple, une maison que j'ai estimé à 260 000 euros est proposée à la vente à 474 000 euros. Elle va avoir du mal à partir. Les gens doublent les prix en essayant de faire l'affaire du siècle. »

 

 

Conséquence : les maisons ne se vendent pas et cela n'arrange personne.

« Le seul bien qui s'est vraiment vendu, c'est un domaine qui se trouve sur le pic. Il s'agit d'une exploitation agricole de 400 hectares, qui recouvre presque la moitié du pic. Elle a été vendue 1,8 million d'euros, ce qui correspondait à son estimation, à un couple de Finlandais. Ils étaient habillés normalement et voulaient reprendre le travail des anciens agriculteurs.

On a appris ensuite qu'ils avaient demandé des devis pour construire des bunkers sur le pic. Mais maintenant c'est leur terrain alors ils font ce qu'ils veulent. »

Plus de chambre pour le 21 décembre 2012

Excepté cette vente, le marché de l'immobilier sur Bugarach ne devrait pas se développer pour autant, explique Bernard Cervières.

« Ces histoires d'apocalypse, ça ne profite pas tant que ça à notre secteur. Cela fait vendre quelques hamburgers, ça fait parler du coin et c'est très bien pour le commerce. »

Un des commerces qui en profite le plus, c'est celui de l'hébergement. En effet pas la peine de chercher une chambre pour la semaine du 21 décembre 2012, tout est déjà complet dans le village.

La responsable du gîte de la Genivrière, à l'entrée de la vallée, explique que « ce n'est pas exceptionnel d'avoir des réservations d'une année sur l'autre », même si cette année elle a augmenté ses prix, jusqu'à 2 900 euros la semaine en été pour une dizaine de personnes.

« Cette augmentation n'est pas liée à 2012, c'est juste que tout coûte plus cher, l'électricité, le chauffage… »

Le gîte accueille souvent des groupes, qui viennent suivre des stages dits énergétiques. Une Irlandaise, qui organise des sessions à Bugarach, a même déjà réservé une semaine en août 2013.

« Ce qui montre bien que certains n'ont pas peur de la fin du monde », explique la responsable du gîte. Et que le business à Bugarach n'est pas non plus prêt de mourir.

 

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The final countdown?

The final countdown? | Bugarach | Scoop.it
Today the final countdown has started.See you in Bugarach http://t.co/84ITLF47...

 

Today is 12.19.18.17.14. In a year, you will find me in Bugarach (Aude, France).

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Roussillon: Bugarach or until the end of the world...

Roussillon: Bugarach or until the end of the world... | Bugarach | Scoop.it
As it says, translating from the back-label: "Inspired by the oldest legends, this Bugarach wine should survive the end of the world and help you get in touch with extraterrestrials. This wine will be at its peak in December 2012..."

 

Cue Edge style guitar strumming... remember the U2 song used for the soundtrack of that early-90s arty apocalyptic Wim Wenders movie? Well, I like a man with a sense of humour, and it makes a refreshing change to come across this Roussillon red in the cluttered wine world. As it says, translating from the back-label: "Inspired by the oldest legends, this Bugarach wine should survive the end of the world and help you get in touch with extraterrestrials. This wine will be at its peak in December 2012..." He's called Jean Pla (pic.) and is probably best known for the "resto-cave" he and his wife used to own in Maury, Le Pichenouille, which he sold this year to focus on his wine broking / making activities. I remember someone also once called him "the Godfather of Maury," with respek.
Bugarach is a tiny village found nearby in the Corbieres at the foot of the mystical 'upside-down' Bugarach peak, which for some reason will be spared next year's apocalypse according to some wise souls. Anyway, this wine is a 100% Grenache blend sourced from vineyards around St-Paul de Fenouillet where Jean lives, is available locally and in "Northern Europe" (a bit vague, see website link below) and in the US via the appropriately named David Vincent Selection (remember the star of the original Invaders TV series?).

 

Cuvée Bugarach 2010 vin de pays des Côtes Catalanes, Jean Pla Sélection (Grenache, 14.5% alc); subtitled as "S'il n'en reste qu'un, je serais celui-la" = "If there's only one left, I'd be this one."
Volatile "real cider" notes in that "natural" wild ferment / low sulphite winemaking style (I'm guessing), nice chunky palate vs rounded tannins with wild blackberry / cherry fruit, has a bit of oomph vs fresher bite, light touch of chocolate oak underneath with grainy texture, 'cidery' vs sweet fruit on the finish tinged with savoury black olive flavours too. €8
http://www.jeanplaselection.com

 

 

 

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The French Town Of Bugarach Gets Ready To Survive The End Of The World

The French Town Of Bugarach Gets Ready To Survive The End Of The World | Bugarach | Scoop.it

Photo by Patrick Aventurier/Getty Images

 

BUGARACH, FRANCE - NOVEMBER 24: The mayor of Bugarach, Jean Pierre Delord, poses with a postcard showing 'Ufo' in front of the village.

 

Some are claiming the village of Bugarach will be the only surviving settlement following a devastating apocalypse in December 2012, on November 24, 2011 in Bugarach, France. Although free publicity has boosted the housing market in the village, the Mayor is concerned about the worldwide publicity and the increased volume of people it might attract to the village and it's mountain, Pic de Bugarach. 

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Apocalypse prediction could spark mass suicide, French agency warns

Apocalypse prediction could spark mass suicide, French agency warns | Bugarach | Scoop.it

Paris (CNN) -- The specter of a mass suicide tied to the widely predicted end of the world in December 2012 has prompted a warning from a government official in France, where people are already gathering at a place believers predict may provide the only escape from the apocalypse.
Georges Fenech, president of French government agency Miviludes, which observes sect movements and warns the public of potential risks, told CNN that he had alerted French public authorities, including the prime minister, to the issue.
"We fear that this message of fear could have serious consequences on fragile members of the French population," he said.


The small southern mountain village of Bugarach is prophesized by some to be one of the few places, if not the only place, that will survive the devastation.


According to Miviludes, settlements in the surrounding area have been established by members of the American Ramtha School of Enlightenment. The head of this presumed sect, Judy Zebra Knight, claims be in contact with Ramtha, a Lemurean warrior who fought the residents of the mythical Atlantis 35,000 years ago.
She has delivered messages about the 2012 apocalypse in front of thousands of followers in the United States, according to Miviludes.
The coordinator for the Ramtha School of Enlightenment in France, Valerie Sautereau, says that group has no apocalyptic beliefs and no link with the village of Bugarach
Suicide resulting from apocalyptic beliefs has already occurred in France in recent years. In 2002 a suicide and several suicide attempts occurred in the town of Nantes within a small circle of people who believed the end of the world was imminent.
"We know from history and experience that apocalyptic discourse can lead to tragedy," Fenech said. "This is why we have taken measures to notify police and other public authorities in order to monitor the situation."
In the late 1990s there was a series of 74 suicides in the late 1990s in France, Switzerland and Canada by followers of the Order of the Solar Temple.
"Around 500 000 French people belong to cults. They affect all kinds of people from all kinds of social backgrounds, including children." Fenech added.

 

There are growing concerns for the village of Bugarach, which also is known on Internet sites as an "alien garage" where extraterrestrial visitors supposedly wait beneath 4,000-foot Pic de Bugarach. Properties are being bought in surrounding isolated areas and construction of bunkers with underground tunnels and food supplies has also been noted, according to Miviludes, France's Interministerial Mission of Vigilance Against Sectarianism.
"If we see thousands of people arriving it will not be safe," Fenech said. "It's a mountainous area with dangerous mountain roads which would need to be closed.
"I have visited the site. People are really worried. It's a tiny village which is receiving thousands of visitors. They hold processions, pray, leave objects. It is essential that we anticipate dangers and take precautionary measures."
He expressed concern for a "climate of fear facilitated by the Internet."
The supposed Apocalypse 2012 has already taken on global significance, with around 2.5 million websites dedicated to the phenomenon. The theories are based on interpretations of the Mayan calendar, which it is said ends on December 21, 2012. Several other astrophysical events have been predicted for this time, including an equinox alignment of the planets.

 

Scientists dismiss the idea.

 

"There are no planetary alignments in the next few decades." NASA says in a Q&A page on its website. "Earth will not cross the galactic plane in 2012, and even if these alignments were to occur, their effects on the Earth would be negligible. ... Credible scientists worldwide know of no threat associated with 2012."
The president of the French society Suicide Ecoute, Isabelle Chaumeil Gueguen, said the organization has so far received no calls "related to the apocalypse predicted for 2012."
However, she added, "it's certainly true that people who are mentally unstable can react strongly to dramatic announcements in the press. If it begins to be mentioned a lot in the media, especially on television, we can expect to have calls about it.
"People of a weak mental disposition are also much more likely to be influenced by cults, and messages spread by social networking sights can be equally dangerous."

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Bugarach: the mystery surrounding the village

Bugarach: the mystery surrounding the village | Bugarach | Scoop.it
The village of Bugarach, population 189, is situated 24 miles southwest of Carcassonne in the Aude department, southwestern France.

 

The Telegraph :

 

The farming village is in the region of the Cathar castles, situated on spectacular rocky outcrops. Regarded as heretics by the Catholic Church, Cathars sought refuge in these castles in the 13th century when Pope Innocent III launched a full scale crusade against them.
The village lies next to the Pic de Bugarach, a rocky peak which, at 1230 metres, is the highest point of the Corbières range of hills. The peak is dwarfed however by the nearby Pyrenees and offers splendid views of the range.
Made of limestone with galleries of caves beneath it, the peak is a geological oddity, since its top layers are millions of years older than its bottom ones, making it an "upside down mountain".
The peak of Bugarach has been shrouded in mystery, with various claims that it houses aliens in cavities beneath the rock.
The internet abounds with tales of the late President François Mitterrand being curiously heliported onto the peak, of mysterious digs conducted by the Nazis and later Mossad, the Israeli secret services. There is talk of the area, near to the Cathar castles, holding the Holy Grail or the treasure of the Templars. A visit to Bugarach is said to have inspired Steven Spielberg in his film, Close Encounters of the Third Kind – although the actual mountain he used is Devil's Tower in Wyoming.

 

Nostradamus, the French apothecary from Provence, is said to have stayed in the area and found the "vibrations" of Bugarach to be positive.
Others say Bugarach is where Jules Verne found the entrance and the inspiration for A Journey to the Centre of the Earth.
Bugarach is in the Languedoc-Roussillon, the world's largest wine growing region.

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